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Scared, Depressed, And Tired
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I am a 21 year old male and have just been diagnosed with celiac. To be honest I am completely devastated. I have been feeling sick for the past 7 years and I am happy to know the problem, but I am having so much trouble going through with cooking and preparing food I don't enjoy. I live with 2 of my best friends and work full time. It is much tougher because I am on a tight budget and don't have a lot of time to shop and am used to relying on fast food. I LOVE pizza and beer and bread.. I use to live on them. I have severe anxiety, and had depression in the past: (Partially due to constant gluten intake) but I am struggling to make everything work. I am falling deep into another depression and it is directly related to over-working and not getting enough food. I want to try and go back to school, but don't have any energy or motivation. I am scared, and afraid. and I don't know what to do. I work all day and by the time I get home I am completely drained and depressed everyday.

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You can still live on pizza, beer and bread.

Udi's bread, either white or whole grain, excellent for gluten free bread. Ask your local organic food store to order some if they don't carry it.

http://www.udisfood.com/

Against the Grain make an excellent pizza crust and baguette. I'm going to see if my local store their rolls today.

http://www.againstthegrainslc.com/

If you are in area that Grandma Ferdon's serves (Midwest area only right now) they have excellent products. They use to have my favorite pizza crust, makes a nice and thin crust. Lemon bars, pumpkin bars are great from here if you don't want to make your own. They also have dumplings and during the holiday season last year made lefse.

http://www.grandmaferdons.com/

I'm not much of a beer drinker but Red Bridge seems ok to the people I serve it too. Ask your local liquor store if they can get you some. Your favorite bar might be able to order it to have on hand for you.

http://www.anheuser-busch.com/ABMarketingRedbridge.html

Prices of gluten free items are high. Udi's bread is about 50 cents a slice in my area. If you order from the company you will also pay shipping fees. Try to get your local organic store to order items you want to try.

Don't worry. You can also live on gluten free food that does not cost an arm and leg. Meat and veggies are gluten free if not seasoned or injected with something with gluten. Keep your eyes open.

You do need to eat lots of veggies and meat to keep up your strength. You can do this.

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Welcome to the forum. I am so sorry you're struggling so with your new diet. It is good news that you've been dx'd after so long. You will have to plan out your meals and eating now. You cannot eat so spontaneously as you did, as you are finding out.

But there are things you can do and, as you pointed out, one of them is to eat enough food so you don't feel deprived and depressed. My son has had struggles with depression as well so I know that is very hard for you. One thing that helped my son was when I read that vitamin C is helpful to keep depression at bay. He takes it daily now and has seen a difference.

As for planning meals, it is super hard to come home from a long day and have to prepare a meal from scratch. Even on a budget there are foods you can have. Dinty Moore beef stew is hardy and only needs warming up to eat. I eat it at work sometimes too as I have a microwave. You can buy a slice of ham to warm and eat, it doesn't need complete cooking time and I think that ham is good with a baked potato, 3 - 5 minutes in the microwave or Ore-Ida frozen potatoes. Ore-Ida has quite a few frozen potato products that are gluten-free, just check their website or package.

What I do is cook a lot on the weekend to last most of the week for lunches and dinners. Take your meat for the week and precook it on the weekend and freeze in lunch or dinner size portions. If you make say spaghetti, ground beef with onion and garlic added to canned sauce, make a big pot and freeze into meal sizes, then you only need to cook the pasta for dinner. I put the sauce on corn tortillas that have been toasted so they are crunchy and make pizzas from it. Corn tortillas make great wraps for your lunchbox, by the way, and Hormel Natural lunchmeats are gluten-free and yummy.

None of the foods I mentioned are expensive. They should meet your budget requirements. You can eat fruit, fresh or canned. Cheese is filling and layered bean dip with corn tortilla chips is a great football game snack. There is a lot you can do and you've come to the right place for answers.

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I am a 21 year old male and have just been diagnosed with celiac. To be honest I am completely devastated. I have been feeling sick for the past 7 years and I am happy to know the problem, but I am having so much trouble going through with cooking and preparing food I don't enjoy. I live with 2 of my best friends and work full time. It is much tougher because I am on a tight budget and don't have a lot of time to shop and am used to relying on fast food. I LOVE pizza and beer and bread.. I use to live on them. I have severe anxiety, and had depression in the past: (Partially due to constant gluten intake) but I am struggling to make everything work. I am falling deep into another depression and it is directly related to over-working and not getting enough food. I want to try and go back to school, but don't have any energy or motivation. I am scared, and afraid. and I don't know what to do. I work all day and by the time I get home I am completely drained and depressed everyday.

Dear 21 yr old....It's not the end of the world it's the beginning of a great lifee! I eat tons of Pizza (rice crust) there are some good ones.....Glutino's is good....and a lot of restaurants are beginning to serve gluten free...look on the internet for restaurants near you. There is also good wheat-free beer! Your depression WILL lift as you eat more healthy food....with in a week or so. You can eat mexican fast food it's gluten free if you do corn tortillas...I call ahead at restaurants for take out that helps too....you can also have burgers on lettuce...(protein style) 2 or 3 will fill you up! I'll check back later to see how you are doing.!

best wishes, gluten free 3 years @ 43 (20 years of ER visits):) it get's better!

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I am sorry you are struggling, but please know that it does get easier over time. There are alot of gluten-free convenience foods: TV dinners, frozen pizzas, cookies, etc. Yes, they are more expensive than regular, but probably not a whole lot more than fast food. I know it's not a "guy thing" but you may have to spend a little of your time off cooking stuff up ahead of time so you have something to reheat in a hurry when you are tired.

I am a Mom and my child and I both have food issues. I am almost always overwhelmed. Cutting corn, soy, dairy, MSG and beef out of the diet in addition to gluten is a real chore because then, most of those convenience foods I mentioned are out too.

Depending on the size of your town/city, there may be some restaurants that offer gluten-free pizza and stuff like that to eat out. I know over in Seattle there are quite a few gluten-free options. Down in Vancouver, WA/Portland, OR there are even more. I don't live close enough to take advantage of those kinds of offerings. We eat often at Wendy's. Baked potato is gluten-free. The chili used to be, but since I can't do beef anymore, I haven't checked that in a while. The Frosty's are gluten-free as well, or at least they were before dairy went out the window or us. At McDonald's, you're stuck with just fries and side salad. Taco Bell has several gluten-free items. All the fast food restaurants have websites and have nutritional info on them. You can look up the gluten-free lists on all of them.

Untreated celiac can cause depression. So can low Vitamin D levels. It will take your villi months to recover after going completely gluten-free, so you may still not be absorbing nutrients, including Vitamin D, properly. See if your docs will run labs for Vitamin D level or just take 1000IU - 2000 IU of Vitamin D3 daily. After a month or so, your mood should start to lift.

I developed celiac around age 12, but wasn't diagnosed until age 42. For 30 years, they couldn't figure out why I was always so sick. I also have type 1 diabetes, so usually my illnesses were blame on that. I was more relieved than stressed when I was finally diagnosed. Once the shock of changing your diet around wears off, you'll be very happy that they figured it out in "only" 7 years.

Best wishes,

Michelle

Western Washington State

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It would help other members if you tell us what state and general location you are in. That way those who also live in that state can tell you the names and locations of stores that carry a good supply of gluten-free food. Most chain supermarkets publish online lists of their brands that are gluten-free. Health food stores tend to be expensive but I have to shop there to find certain products that I really want. Coops tend to have a decent selection of gluten-free items. Join a local celiac disease support group. If they don't already join together and buy in bulk maybe you can be the one to start such a group.

It is a royal pain but I save all register tapes with gluten-free items on them. I carry a small notebook and jot down stuff like the brand of bread (or mix) that I buy, what it costs, and then what a similar size loaf of regular bread costs. I keep a mileage record of all trips to the doctor or lab and any associated parking fees. If you accumulate all health related expenses and they exceed 7.5% of your total income, you can itemize this expense on your income tax. Finally, it is possible your salary is low enough to qualify for food stamps. I find it easy to make casseroles like chili and Spanish rice. You can't use flavor packets--you will need to buy and use your own spices. Of course, you will have to check any canned goods you use but that isn't terribly hard. For instance, all Del Monte canned vegetables are gluten-free, along with all fresh fruits and vegetables. Buy a pound of ground beef or some chicken and put together a casserole during the evening or on a day off. It will keep for a week in the fridge or you can freeze single servings. Home made gluten-free casseroles taste great and you will have to make your roommates accept the fact that they HAVE to leave your special food alone. You have to be able to come home and know you have something to eat and the guys will just have to accept that. Of course, if you eat any food someone else has paid for you need to reciprocate. That will help keep them honest.

Do you eat cereal? Corn and Rice Chex are gluten-free and taste great. Make certain the front of the box says gluten free. There are, I believe, three flavors that are gluten-free. I believe I found a berry flavored Chex somewhere in my travels but I can't find it locally. If you name any chain grocery stores near you we can tell you what our experiences have been finding gluten-free food there. I am lucky to have Wegmans where I live and I love to vacation in New England and their Hannaford stores, especially the big ones, have a great selection. Both of these stores have a dedicated section for gluten-free in the health/natural food sections.

There is a great little book that lists loads of gluten-free food so you can check an item before you shop, or just use the book in the store. I make sure I am not blocking an aisle and I check as I put items into my cart. I

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Bless your heart. It WILL get better and easier.

See if your grocery store has Ledbetter's packaged bacon wrapped filets. Ceasp for a steak and a few minutes on each side in a very hot iron skillet will give you a delisous medium rare steak. Tear up a little lettuce for a salad and pour on the blue cheese dressing.

Wendy's chili over their baked potato is good fast food. Five Guys french fries are legal. Several of the Progresso soups are gluten free (sorry, you have to read the labels)

Any fresh vegetables and fruits are good. Look at vegetables you can eat raw or with a minimum of fuss (carrots, cucumbers, tomatoes, celery,) Make a hole in the top of a small onion (especially red one) fill the hole with butter and microwave for a few minutes until soft.

Most of all, remember there are a whole lot of us out here who know what you are going through and we are all pulling for you. You can do this and you will feel SO GOOD and be so glad not to be sick any more.

Check back in and let us know how you are progressing. Also ask questions. We Celiacs love to share our triumphs and discoveries.

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Thank you everyone for all the quick responses and suggestions! Every bit of information helps.

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I am a 25 year old who just found out I have Celiac Disease on November 5th. I have been good so far, but I know how you feel!!! I LOVE Pizza, BEER and taco bell! I, too, am SO happy to finally know after years of wondering what was wrong with me. My boyfriend I live with can eat whatever he wants! I have cried about it, gotten angry about it, and still have a LOOOONG road ahead of me....but know you are not alone. It's going to be hard, but think of how much better you will feel!! Hang in there, and know eventually...at least as far as I'm told, you will learn to live with it and crave these NEW foods...Good luck!!!

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Wow, im in nearly the same boat.

Im a 28yo father to an 16mo old. For about 8 years ive had stomach issues. I chalked it up to lactose intolerance, but avoiding lactose didnt completely help, and im a big fan of ice cream so I just suffered the effects. About a week ago I was at the doctor for a physical and mentioned the 8 years of chronic diarrhea and he freaked out. Sent me for a complete blood panel, etc. Blood work came back with markers for Celiacs. He refereed me to a Gastro, that appt is in 4 weeks. I didnt believe it at first, but the more research im doing, Celiacs actually makes sense, and im terrified. Im a big guy (6'3" 300lbs), and I love to eat. I work full time, go to school part time, husband and father, and active in the church. I have no time to sleep, let alone worry about food. As they say, im sick and tired of being sick and tired. I cant stand feeling like this anymore. Ive tried to get myself to start identifying gluten in the things I eat, and for 2 days now ive been trying to avoid it, just to ease some of the pain in my stomach. While I dont feel physically as bad as I have, mentally im starting to loose it. I dont have time to cook meals, I eat in the cafeteria at work, and whatever is made for dinner at home. Looking around at my eating habits and areas, im going to be stuck eating chicken and rice for the rest of my life! My wife and I live with her parents (were poor), so I cant expect a meal to be made specially for me, dinner is made, and thats what there is to eat like it or not. Every single thing that I eat on a regular basis has gluten. EVERY SINGLE THING! This is such a major change, its really got me freaking out.

Sorry for rambeling, thanks for listening.

Russ

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Welcome to the forum! I'm sorry you are feeling at a crisis point. It is a big change to our lives but even though it seems insurmountable, you can and will do it. It will get easier and you will soon find it your new normal.

But for now you need to keep eating gluten for your upcoming test. You can go gluten-free on the day of your endoscopy.

You said you spend a lot of time with church so your faith should see you through. Sometimes we're pushed to the limit so that we lean harder on our faith. Discuss your fears with your minister and get some support.

Enlist the help of your family. You live with them so I have to believe they want you to be well and will take this journey to good health with you. If it were your wife or child that had celiac disease, wouldn't you protect their food and see that they were fed properly?

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I am a 21 year old male and have just been diagnosed with celiac. To be honest I am completely devastated. I have been feeling sick for the past 7 years and I am happy to know the problem, but I am having so much trouble going through with cooking and preparing food I don't enjoy. I live with 2 of my best friends and work full time. It is much tougher because I am on a tight budget and don't have a lot of time to shop and am used to relying on fast food. I LOVE pizza and beer and bread.. I use to live on them. I have severe anxiety, and had depression in the past: (Partially due to constant gluten intake) but I am struggling to make everything work. I am falling deep into another depression and it is directly related to over-working and not getting enough food. I want to try and go back to school, but don't have any energy or motivation. I am scared, and afraid. and I don't know what to do. I work all day and by the time I get home I am completely drained and depressed everyday.

A quick meal I always make is

Kidney beans or black beans

shred some cheese

tomato's

onions

Heat a few corn tortillas in the microwave and you have a nice taco. They are also easy to take to work

I also make everything above with white or brown rice (minus the tortilla) Throw it all in a plastic container and you have lunch for the next day. (I usually put the tomato's in a baggy so they aren't heated when I put everything in the microwave.

You can also make fajitas with the above with chicken or steak. Pick up a iron pan at Target. We have two and they are always out. Great to sautee onions, meats, vegetables. Give it time and it will all work out. I hated it too and still have some bad days, but considering what other people have to deal with I guess I am pretty lucky! Imagine if all of a sudden you were paralyzed or you couldn't see any more! You can do this, it's just going to take some time.

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I am a 21 year old male and have just been diagnosed with celiac. To be honest I am completely devastated. I have been feeling sick for the past 7 years and I am happy to know the problem, but I am having so much trouble going through with cooking and preparing food I don't enjoy. I live with 2 of my best friends and work full time. It is much tougher because I am on a tight budget and don't have a lot of time to shop and am used to relying on fast food. I LOVE pizza and beer and bread.. I use to live on them. I have severe anxiety, and had depression in the past: (Partially due to constant gluten intake) but I am struggling to make everything work. I am falling deep into another depression and it is directly related to over-working and not getting enough food. I want to try and go back to school, but don't have any energy or motivation. I am scared, and afraid. and I don't know what to do. I work all day and by the time I get home I am completely drained and depressed everyday.

Also, remember you body hadn't been getting the nutrients it needs and that is probably why you are so tired and depressed. You are on the right track now, so give it some time and you will have more energy.

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Welcome to the forum! I'm sorry you are feeling at a crisis point. It is a big change to our lives but even though it seems insurmountable, you can and will do it. It will get easier and you will soon find it your new normal.

But for now you need to keep eating gluten for your upcoming test. You can go gluten-free on the day of your endoscopy.

You said you spend a lot of time with church so your faith should see you through. Sometimes we're pushed to the limit so that we lean harder on our faith. Discuss your fears with your minister and get some support.

Enlist the help of your family. You live with them so I have to believe they want you to be well and will take this journey to good health with you. If it were your wife or child that had celiac disease, wouldn't you protect their food and see that they were fed properly?

It sucks that I have to purposly keep hurting myself now that I know ways to avoid it. My consult with the gastro is a month and I'm sure it will take a month or so after that to schedule the endoscopy.

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It sucks that I have to purposly keep hurting myself now that I know ways to avoid it. My consult with the gastro is a month and I'm sure it will take a month or so after that to schedule the endoscopy.

You can call your gastro and ask them to fit you into the first cancellation they have. That should move you up.

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I'm 38 years old and have struggled with everything you have stated. And by the looks of these replies neither of us are alone. Lately I have been dealing with alot of anger and frustration :angry: and mourning foods I can no longer eat. Simple things like bread rolls, and the way food used to taste. Not to mention the absolute lack of medical support.

The change in diet and lifestyle is not only a challenge but can be a drag down knock out brawl and you don

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