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Gluten Free Kitchen
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I just read the Gluten Free Bible. The author says that if you live in a house with those who eat wheat that you have to get different utinsels. I didn't think about this issue but have been breaking out in DH even though I'm being very careful with my diet. Does this mean that wheat can get into silverware and things like that even after it's been washed? Has anyone had this experience with roomates and what did you do about it? thank you in advance.

Ken Ritter

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I just read the Gluten Free Bible. The author says that if you live in a house with those who eat wheat that you have to get different utinsels. I didn't think about this issue but have been breaking out in DH even though I'm being very careful with my diet. Does this mean that wheat can get into silverware and things like that even after it's been washed? Has anyone had this experience with roomates and what did you do about it? thank you in advance.

Not true. Just wash it well and you'll be fine. Oh, God. The minute I saw Gluten Free Bible I went nearly panicked :o . There have been rantings at Delphi on the inaccuracy of the book. First, Jax doesn't research carefully: she says that Cheetos and Tootsie Rolls aren't gluten-free--they both are. She has so many inaccuracies, suggesting that you eat something just so you don't offend your host, regardless of whether it contains gluten and suggesting that you take the wheat communion, hold onto it, and later feed it to the birds. She is more aware of contamination in this book than in the last, but I still wouldn't trust the book farther than I can throw it <_< . She still mentions removing the contents of a "normal" sandwich and putting it between two slices of gluten free bread and eating it -- if you are not "too sensitive."

TO OTHER READERS: Don't purchase that book!!! I highly recommend, instead, Wheat Free Worry Free by Danna Korn (the true gluten-free Bible) or Shelly Case's celiac book. Jax is too inaccurate. I apologize for this rant, but it's scary that such inaccuracies are out there.

Here is the review section at Amazon. It's basically a war between the newbies who like the writing style and assume the info. is correct and the old-timers who are warring against it:

http://www.amazon .com/exec/obidos/ASIN/080...3353027-3899013

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have to get different utinsels

Things that are poreous such as wooden spoons DO need to be replaced or only used on gluten free or gluten full foods. They can trap nasty things in them and make you sick.

-Jessica :rolleyes:

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Right. Avoid wood and teflon. But in terms of regular, metal utensils, don't worry.

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Using a dishwasher is best when you share kitchen things, I find. Somethings that need to be hand-washed we have two of or just one clearly know to be only used for glutenfree foods.

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Thank you all for your thoughts. :lol:

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I use every utensil in our kitchen, wooden spoons, whatever, regardless of what it has touched before, with no problems. I wash well or run through the dishwasher.

You may find there won't be a lot of gluten around besides store-bought breadstuffs if you are doing the cooking

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Wood absorbs everything even when wased and washed. Just because you don't get sick doesn't mean you are not getting gluten.

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MySuicidalTurtle,

I'd like to push back a little on your last statement... How do you know this? Has there been a study on it? Is there any proof? How do you/they/whoever know that a wooden spoon - washed and washed - still retains gluten and causes harm?

I've read posts on this topic which advocated virtually replacing everything in the kitchen. I don't believe this is practical advice. It is entirly possible to clean up most if not all of your kitchen.

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I actually have to agree with everyone who said replace wooden spoons. It is true that wooden spoons retain gluten-they retain everything they are put into so if you used wooden items previously then they should be replaced.

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Yes--I don't think anyone has tested how a wooden spoon retains gluten, but it's just generally known to...just as teflon is thought to.

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Wooden spoons and cutting boards are also bacteria traps. Wood is a naturally porous product, it absorbs whatever it is in contact with.

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Determine how sensitive you are. It varies for each of us. I have a friend who can cook for her non-celiac disease husband and kids with no apparent problems. I, however, am very sensitive. We also found that if non-gluten-free stuff was around, my daughter tended to snitch and cheat. No matter how much we preached, someone was always double-dipping in the butter or jelly or peanut butter. You get the picture. We finally went to a totally gluten-free house. It was not until we did that (even to the point of wiping down cabinets/shelving and shampooing carpets) that I stopped having symptoms regularly. I replaced my former pots and pans, threw out the wooden spoons, and replaced the appliances such as toasters and bread machines. It made a world of difference in both our health and our medical expenses.

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I have a quick question about dishwashers. I have a family that refuses to go gluten-free and my question is : When you wash dishes in a dishwasher (you know when a glass or plastic container gets turned upside down you get all that gritty junk inside) are you cross contaminating all your dishes? Then, would all restaraunts be off limits because no way in h#%& would they wash your dishes seperately. Also I have purchased those disposable ziploc containers and when I open a new jar of peanut butter and Jelly and other stuff I immediately put in containers for me and mark every lid with a marker. I have also adopted red as my official gluten-free color. I took red nail polish and put it on pan handles, cookie sheet lips and other things that are designated gluten-free. Also red duct tape on things that don't go in the oven. It helps even my 6 year old son, he asks when ever he sees red items if he can use it or not.

Just my questions and two cents

Christi :P

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When you wash dishes in a dishwasher (you know when a glass or plastic container gets turned upside down you get all that gritty junk inside) are you cross contaminating all your dishes?

Then, would all restaraunts be off limits because no way in h#%& would they wash your dishes seperately.

Ideally, a good dishwasher will leave nothing behind - maybe clean water in an upturned container. If you're getting stuff left behind, you may want to 1) check the detergent you're using, 2) make sure there's no food particles going INTO the dishwasher, 3) check that the dishwasher doesn't need repair. (We've been dealing with this issue ourselves.)

As for a restaurant.... they don't use automatic dishwashers. Every restaurant I have been inside the kitchen of (and it's a few) washes dishes by hand. They have to be air dried, as well, from what I understand, for health reasons. (Drying with a towel can be problematic - studies have show that the towels, which stay damp when you use them so often, grow bacteria and mold fairly quickly.

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I have worked in many restaraunts and they all had automatic dishwashers that they changed the water in after 20 or so loads. they work differantly than your standard home dishwasher but they work on pretty much the same principles. As for washing by hand, we were not allowed to because the temperature of the water had to be hot enough to kill bacteria and you could not touch the water at those temps. The FDA would not allow hand washing. Everything had to be dishwasher safe. As for my dishwasher, it has a garbage disposal in it and chops the food material super fine. When my dishes are extra dirty I get grit on my dishes and have to wash them again. This is my question, wouldn't some of that grit be gluten since my household is not gluten-free, only me. and since there is some grit that is visible there of course would be residue that is not visible but from what I have read could still be potentially hazadouz to the celiac. OR am I just obsessing way too much and just live my life without over analizing everything, just being careful ;) (anyone ever notice that analizing has the word anal in it :rolleyes: ) I'm sorry for being so weird, just trying to figure how to feel better and not getting all the way there yet. I am also a little overwhelmed and still "grieving" my favorite gluten laden things.

Christi

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Fascinating... my friends who had restaurants weren't allowed to have automatic dishwashers. Interesting difference. Of course, there may have been a prewashing area I forget about, but I remember the other one. Or maybe my memory is all twisted up...

Either way, in the home... I'm unfamiliar with that type of dishwasher that you note - I'd recommend cleaning the foodscraps off the plates thoroughly before putting them in the dishwasher if some particles get left behind. That's definitely not something you're too paranoid about! ;-)

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Must be the differances in state compliances. Icould not imagine washing all the dishes a restraunt generates by hand!!!! I have only worked in Minnesota and North Dakota restraunts, the laws were the same in both states. That is interesting, I have always wondered which way of doing dishes is best. I will stick with my dishwasher, easier! It does help having worked in a few rest. in the area because I know lots of the management and they are more willing to help out someone they know as far as special preparations. This will probably change down the road but for now, while I am learning, it is good!

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I am going back to the info that celiac3270 posted about the book by Jax and off the dishwasher talk (sorry) :wacko: Thank you celiac3270. I just recommended this book elsewhere and oh, my gosh! I feel so terrible! I just loved her writing style and chose to ignore the inacurracies! I now realize after reading your posting and also the comments at Amazon, that I should have never suggested this book. Thank you so much for your knowledge and insight. I read EVERYTHING that I can get my hands on about celiac disease and never realized that others may not read as much or the way I read and that some info in The gluten-free Bible could be damaging to those who don't disregard the 'untruths'. I have read many of your postings and want you to know that I think you must really be amazing! Thanks for your help!

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