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Iodine Patch Test


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6 replies to this topic

#1 mhalpin12

 
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Posted 27 November 2009 - 03:31 PM

Since my skin biopsy for DH came back negative (though it WAS done wrong, and I'm considering another biopsy with a different doctor), I thought I'd try the iodine patch test that I've read about here on these boards. If I get a positive reaction with that, I'll just go Gluten Free.

I bought some Iodine at Walgreens, a 10% concentration that says 1% iodine tincture, soaked a bandaid with it and applied to healthy skin. I made my husband do it, too, as a sort of "control." Left them on for about 18 hours. His skin looks normal, mine looks a little red, but is not itchy or blistery. What does a positive iodine patch test look like? How long does it take to show? Does the iodine have to be of a stronger concentration, and if so, where would I find something like that?

Thanks for any help you can give. Much appreciated!

Michelle in TN
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#2 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 29 November 2009 - 03:08 AM

If the skin is red I would say you are reacting on some level. I would do the test a little differently. Put the iodine directly on your skin then cover it with the bandaid and leave the bandaid there for 48 hours without washing the area. Kind of like the patch test that should be done before coloring our hair, the instructions for that always say to wait at least 48 hours before deciding your not reacting to something in the color.
  • 0
Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#3 mhalpin12

 
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Posted 29 November 2009 - 05:29 PM

If the skin is red I would say you are reacting on some level. I would do the test a little differently. Put the iodine directly on your skin then cover it with the bandaid and leave the bandaid there for 48 hours without washing the area. Kind of like the patch test that should be done before coloring our hair, the instructions for that always say to wait at least 48 hours before deciding your not reacting to something in the color.


I think I will do that. I think, too, that I"ve pretty much decided to go gluten-free and see what happens. I've been debating on going gluten-free or corn-free, or maybe both, couldn't decide which one to try first. I have actual test results that show a corn allergy, but I've never seen any kind of reaction to corn in the past. Last week I ate a huge bowl of popcorn and nothing happened. I'm suffering with an outbreak the past two days after I ate a huge serving of salted pretzels...I'm thinking that it was both the gluten and the iodized salt on the pretzels. Plus, my rash pattern follows the DH presentation perfectly. I have more evidence that it's DH rather than a corn allergy. Ack! I'm kind of panicking, though...could there be a worse time to go gluten-free than December, with all the yummy cookies and treats?! :) I'm ready to stop itching, though, so I'm sticking to it.

Thanks for all the help!

Michelle H. in TN
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#4 mhalpin12

 
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Posted 30 November 2009 - 06:27 AM

Just wanted to add that last night (Sunday), I noticed the little itchy bumps on the site of the iodine patch. It was that insane, burning itching, and just the tiny little bumps that I get with it. My outbreaks never look like the pictures I Google on the internet...they're not large, fluid-filled blisters, just small bumps, which I immediately scratch and make bleed. Anyway, there is a good sized crop of them on the site of the iodine patch, 2 days after the test. I'm taking that as confirmation. I ate nothing but gluten, seafood and iodized salt all weekend, and I'm itching like crazy today. Gluten free diet starts today with a trip to Whole Foods! (or as we call it around here, Whole Paycheck! LOL! :)

Thanks for the help.
Michelle in TN
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#5 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 01 December 2009 - 04:36 AM

It does sound like a positive patch test. I am glad to hear that you are going to go gluten-free. I think it will help a lot. There are lots of gluten-free cookie and cake mixes and even pie crusts to make you holiday eating joyful and calorie filled. Just ask and we will be glad to guide you in making the best gluten-free Xmas dinner you have ever enjoyed. For my family I will be making a ham, Hormel black label, a turkey breast, organic and uninjected with anything, candied yams, mashed potatoes, I am lazy and will use paradise organic dryed, a couple veggies and pumpkin and an apple custard pie using gluten-free cookies for the crust. On Xmas eve I plan on doing pizza with Gluten Free Pantry's French Bread mix and all the toppings. Gee I am making myself hungrey here. Anyway a gluten-free holiday feast can be very enjoyable even for gluten eaters and hopefully by the time the holiday arrives the diet will have cleared your itchies.
  • 0
Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#6 mhalpin12

 
mhalpin12

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Posted 01 December 2009 - 08:17 PM

It does sound like a positive patch test. I am glad to hear that you are going to go gluten-free. I think it will help a lot. There are lots of gluten-free cookie and cake mixes and even pie crusts to make you holiday eating joyful and calorie filled. Just ask and we will be glad to guide you in making the best gluten-free Xmas dinner you have ever enjoyed. For my family I will be making a ham, Hormel black label, a turkey breast, organic and uninjected with anything, candied yams, mashed potatoes, I am lazy and will use paradise organic dryed, a couple veggies and pumpkin and an apple custard pie using gluten-free cookies for the crust. On Xmas eve I plan on doing pizza with Gluten Free Pantry's French Bread mix and all the toppings. Gee I am making myself hungrey here. Anyway a gluten-free holiday feast can be very enjoyable even for gluten eaters and hopefully by the time the holiday arrives the diet will have cleared your itchies.


Mmmmm...you're making my mouth water! LOL! :) I can't wait until I'm proficient enough at gluten-free cooking to be able to make all the things you're describing. For now, as I start out, I'm just sticking with whole, unprocessed, naturally gluten-free foods, and some store-bought things. Wish me luck! :)

Michelle in TN
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#7 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 02 December 2009 - 03:20 AM

Mmmmm...you're making my mouth water! LOL! :) I can't wait until I'm proficient enough at gluten-free cooking to be able to make all the things you're describing. For now, as I start out, I'm just sticking with whole, unprocessed, naturally gluten-free foods, and some store-bought things. Wish me luck! :)

Michelle in TN


That's the way to go. You can add in a gluten-free mix or two as you heal and feel up to it. Most of what I make is naturally gluten free and a lot of what you already cook can be made easily by adjusting just a bit. Homemake beef stew is one example, when I make it I just cut some of the potatoes up really, really tiny and those break up and thicken the stew without the need for flour. If you have a favorite pumpkin pie recipe you can always make it without the crust. As time goes on you should see that much of what you alreay cook is easy to make gluten-free or already is.
I do wish you good luck and quick healing. I hope by the time Xmas arrives you are feeling great.
  • 0
Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)




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