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College Life
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I am fairly new to all of this. I was some what aware of what Celiac and eatting gluten-free were before, but only diagnosed officially with Celiac on Monday. I am hoping to start back up with college this spring semester. I am just going to take a class or two and make sure I am ok before I go back to the dorm life style and all. I want to know how you guys eat while at school/college. IT will be easier commuting because I can bring food from home, but what about when I go back to dorms. Also what kinds of make up/face stuff do you use, I been using some and getting rashes....doc said they prolly have some form of gluten in them. Make up, I usually get what ever is on sale or I have a coupon for. I use Clinque for face stuff, and their Happy perfume. Shampoos I get whats on sale. Living on a tight budget, so cheaper brands are perfered here, but willing to spend more for my health.

In addition to Celiac, I am a type 1 diabetic, have asthma (dx this past august), adrenal insufficiency/addisons disease, and hypothyroidism.

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Hey there, I just started gluten free a few months ago and still feel like i havent even cracked the surface of everything. I have made alot of chili and soup myself and eat alot of chicken, fish and tuna. Rice is good, brown is even better, but you could put chicken

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Hey guys, so glad this thread was started. I'm under similar circumstances -- just diagnosed and in college.

One of my favorite things that was a big help was finding a gluten-free soup brand (like Amy's or something similar) that I could heat up when I'm in a hurry. This way, I can have soup and salad for dinner or lunch. I know that, being in college, you want to be able to just throw ramen in a bowl and run off, but this gives you a really tasty alternative (although more expensive, of course), so you can still eat on the run. Luckily, all those gluten-free soups I've found are organic, so they taste homemade even though they're from a can. Nature Valley, the company that makes granola bars, makes some types that are not MADE with gluten, although I don't know what the dangers of cross-contamination are there. Don't know how this would affect any of your other conditions, unfortunately.

I'm just thinking of fast, dorm-life options. Good luck! And glutenfreegirl, thanks for the advice. Lots of help for me, too!

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Trying to think of fast options too... i mean on weekends i try and make most of my food so i dont have to worry during the week. What about like meatloaf or burgers? or wings in the crockpot and just leave them all day on low . YUM-O lol. :D

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Hey guys, so glad this thread was started. I'm under similar circumstances -- just diagnosed and in college.

One of my favorite things that was a big help was finding a gluten-free soup brand (like Amy's or something similar) that I could heat up when I'm in a hurry. This way, I can have soup and salad for dinner or lunch. I know that, being in college, you want to be able to just throw ramen in a bowl and run off, but this gives you a really tasty alternative (although more expensive, of course), so you can still eat on the run. Luckily, all those gluten-free soups I've found are organic, so they taste homemade even though they're from a can. Nature Valley, the company that makes granola bars, makes some types that are not MADE with gluten, although I don't know what the dangers of cross-contamination are there. Don't know how this would affect any of your other conditions, unfortunately.

I'm just thinking of fast, dorm-life options. Good luck! And glutenfreegirl, thanks for the advice. Lots of help for me, too!

I don't know if you have seen them, but Thai kitchen has little soup packages similar to ramen only with rice noodles. Not as inexpensive as ramen, but not too high priced. I have even found them at Big Lots if you have one nearby.

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Hey everyone,

it's cool that a thread like this was started. I actually switched to gluten free a month and a half ago about half way through college. The convient thing for me has been Art Institute's use of apartments as dorms. It's such a handy thing to have a nice kitchen. I'm still new to what's good and quick, but usually I'll just make instant rice and Steamfresh veggies, or baked chicken with a potatoe. Stirfry's also something I experiment with a lot. When I was rushing with finals recently I ate gluten free cereals and fruit, with tea, definitely wasnt getting enough to eat this past week because of it but at least finals are about done. I'm planning on being able to finally go shopping at a Trader Joes soon to see what they offer.

I was really pleased that my work is highly supportive of my gluten free diet. I work as a resident adviser in the dorms and we usually have an end of the quarter dinner, where this time it was Greek food with pizza and gyros, but they ordered a gluten free meal for me! :D

I dont use make up so I cant help with that but I do know of a nice brand of shampoos that you can use, its dessert essence organics and clearly labeled gluten free. Its about 8 dollars a bottle but its well worth it especially if you get reactions on your skin from gluten. I would get such an itchy scalp. Think of it this way, although it is expensive, its saving you the pain and bother of a reaction. ^_^

Happy holidays!

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Hey Guys,

I am a freshman at college and just got through my first semester. I have been gluten free for almost a year so when I was choosing a college finding out if they were able to cater to my diet was one of the first questions I asked. At the University of New Hampshire there is a refrigerator filled with gluten free breads, bagels, waffles, along with salad dressings, individual cream cheeses and peanut butters. Also, they offer an order form for gluten free foods such as Amy's pizza, macaroni and cheese, and other products. When I don't feel like using one of those, I will just look at the diet information of what is being served, not sure if other schools do this but we use "guiding stars" and all allergen information is listed. It is really great, and much easier than I was anticipating. See if you can get in touch with your schools registered dietitian or head of the culinary department, that's what I did and it made my life so much easier.

Also, if you are looking to bake some goodies that taste just as good as before (with regular flour) use Tom Sawyers gluten free flour. Just google it online and his page should come up. It is so easy to work with, and everything comes out delicious!

Best of luck to all of you!

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Check the international foods section. There are a lot of Thai and Indian prepackaged foods that you can get that are gluten-free. Also, Minute brand minute rice comes in microwaveable bowls perfectly sized for 1 meal. If you've been officially diagnosed you can also try contacting your school's food service and see what they can do. Some schools, such as Muhlenberg, already have a gluten-free section. I would, however, pay a little extra for a dorm with a kitchen if you can. Also, just read the ingredients on the packages stuff they sell in the store. Also, Heinz and General Mills, which includes Betty Crocker, use wheat allergy warning labels. So does the Wal-Mart brand of stuff. If the ingredients list doesn't include wheat on those products and there is no wheat allergy warning you are safe. And NEVER go to Subway. The way they handle there stuff you can't even get a salad without cross-contamination. That was a really bad day for me, and I did make the person serving me change her gloves first. Also, a lot of the ChiChis microwaveable meals are gluten-free, and Del Monte's Harvest Selections line has at least a few gluten-free items, including beef stew. Healthy Choice and Progresso soups use gluten-free broth when making their chicken soups, so the Chicken Rice is okay. You can also make yourself salad if you have a knife and cutting board. Just check your school's policy on the knife first. You really don't want to end up in a disciplinary hearing because you got caught cutting cucumbers for your dinner.

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I'm recently gluten-free and in college and its very difficult for lunches. And depressing some times lol. I can't eat anything from the cafeteria at my school, even a salad made me fairly sick. Vending machine stuff has been fine so far (when I know its gluten-free already)

I would cook on the weekends and then split what I made up into tupperware and just take those for lunch sometimes. Thankfully this semester, I only have one day where I'll be at school over lunchtime though. I'm starting to find some really great snack stuff though, thats relatively healthy. I just found these...rice things lol. They are called crisps but are like a delicious cross between crackers and chips. They are called "riceworks" www.riceworks.ca I've tried the sea salt, and the salsa fresca, which honestly taste like you are eating salsa. They are so yummy.

If you can cook, or your mom can You should try the cookbook "You Won't Believe It's Gluten-Free!" by Roben Ryberg, I just got it and its the best one I've seen so far. The recipes are easy, and single flour. And sooo yummy. I've only made some of the baked goods so far, but all tastes great and were very light.

Good luck...maybe we can all help each other get through this!

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I am also glad this thread was started. I am a senior in college and just got diagnosed last week. The first couple days are rough. But I spent the weekend shopping around and the local grocery stores seeing what each had to offer and the prices. If you have a King Soopers in your area that was awesome they have alot of gluten free food and even label it clearly so you can see.

I eat alot of fruit. and try to cook at home as much as possible. I have made some awesome gluten-free brownies and if you can find this company called Udi's they are based out of Denver, CO they have gluten-free muffins, bread, and pizza crust and have a dedicated gluten-free bakery. You could store some of that in your dorm room. Or Maybe instead of the dorms you can try to rent a room or a place near your school where you can have full access to a kitchen and live with another girl or two. Thats what i have always done and have got alot of support that way too. When you go back to the dorms if you do I would do what others have said contact your school dietician or whoever is in charge of the cafeteria and let them know what you need. If you are paying your meals in a lump sum with tuition they need to accommodate you! Your paying them.

Make-up i use MAC makeup. http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/index.php?showtopic=17965

Never had a problem with it and for skin care i use Skinlogics ( which can be bought at a dermatologists office ). For body soap i use Aveno the green lid one. And Shampoo I use usually Alterna, Wella, Herbal Ess., Its up to you and what you like.

Hope this helps! You are not alone they say 1 in 133 people have Celiac and many are undiagnosed. Just

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This may seem like a dumb question, but just checking, do you go to UNH? i am a sophmore there and have been on a gluten free diet for a long time. you always feel like the only person on the diet so it would be great to meet someone else at school on a gluten free diet! :)

Hey Guys,

I am a freshman at college and just got through my first semester. I have been gluten free for almost a year so when I was choosing a college finding out if they were able to cater to my diet was one of the first questions I asked. At the University of New Hampshire there is a refrigerator filled with gluten free breads, bagels, waffles, along with salad dressings, individual cream cheeses and peanut butters. Also, they offer an order form for gluten free foods such as Amy's pizza, macaroni and cheese, and other products. When I don't feel like using one of those, I will just look at the diet information of what is being served, not sure if other schools do this but we use "guiding stars" and all allergen information is listed. It is really great, and much easier than I was anticipating. See if you can get in touch with your schools registered dietitian or head of the culinary department, that's what I did and it made my life so much easier.

Also, if you are looking to bake some goodies that taste just as good as before (with regular flour) use Tom Sawyers gluten free flour. Just google it online and his page should come up. It is so easy to work with, and everything comes out delicious!

Best of luck to all of you!

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I hope you don't mind someone a little older chiming in here (I'm 31), but having been through college, a master's and law school, I've got a lot of experience navigating though universities.

1. Talk to your school. They usually have a department that deals with students with disabilities and special needs. This should be your first point of contact. Be prepared to provide doctors notes and associated documentation. The school is not being snippy here, they want to know exactly what your problem is and what you need so they can figure out how to help you.

The disability coordinator may help you with the following, but if not, do it on your own:

2. Talk to your school's dining facility. They may be able to provide gluten free options for you. This could involve a gluten free option with every meal (some universities are already doing this, I hear), or something as simple as buying a gluten free cereal and hiding it in a cabinet so you can grab it when you come in for breakfast, and marking items as gluten free when they are, and doing their best to keep them separate.

3. Talk with your student housing department. Maybe rooming in an on campus dorm or apartment with another celiac or gluten sensitive person might be an option for you if there is someone else on campus. Otherwise, they may be able to accommodate cross-contamination issues by giving you a single room and permission to have your own microwave, hot pot, and mini-fridge.

4. Let your professors know what is going on. Most of them actually care. If you have to miss class or an exam on account of your celiac (uh oh, the dining hall accidentally glutened you and you had to spend class in the bathroom instead), accommodations may need to be made. Let your professors know up front. Approach them during their office hours during the first week of school (not after class) and let them know you're a student with a medical condition, chances are it won't impact your academics, but just in case, you wanted to give them a heads up. It's always better to tell them BEFORE rather than after so it's not a surprise and they don't think you're making something up. Doctors notes help here too.

I know the university I went to as an undergrad and graduate student, Loyola Marymount in Los Angeles, bent over backward to accommodate students with disabilities and medical problems. This is pretty common with private universities. If you feel they aren't listening to you, have your parent call, or arrange a meeting with the disability people and yourself, and bring your parent along. In my experience, the university assumes the parent is the one who is more likely paying the bills or making a donation to the school, so they will listen to unhappy parents. I have heard this doesn't make as much a difference at public universities, but I have no experience in that world myself.

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Hey guys,

I'm a freshman at UT Austin and I got diagnosed the day before I moved into my dorm last semester, it has been quite the adjustment. I have tried working with the school cafeterias but they are so big that they really can't ensure no cross contamination, so I have stopped eating there. They also won't refund my meal plan money, but they have started keeping some gluten free frozen meals, which is nice because they are so expensive. I was really upset to find out last semester that the Amy's meals aren't made in a dedicated factory, they have made me sick 3 times so I had to stop eating them, which means my only options are the five or six dollar meals. I don't know about you, but I can't afford that. I like to go home and make soups and pastas and freeze them to bring back to my dorm, this really works out well. I also buy a rotisserie chicken from Whole Foods or H-E-B every once in a while, these can last about a week and aren't too expensive, and you can change up your meals with different sides. I have also figured out how to cook rice pasta in the microwave (it takes about 15 minutes though) and I like to make the Annie's mac and cheese in there. Believe it or not, you can make some pretty decent scrambled eggs in the microwave too, just look up some recipes online. Lately I have taken to making gluten free granola in the microwave (with gluten free oats) and that's a great snack. Other than that, I keep a lot of yogurt, lunch meat, fruit, canned vegetables, soups, and cream of rice, which has turned out to be my go to breakfast this year. I would love to hear some more ideas! I actually saw a recipe for gluten free microwave brownies the other day that I'm considering trying.

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Hi everyone,

This is my 10th year being gluten free, and i'm halfway through my second year at college.

First, let me just say that it IS really hard, and there will be LOTS of temptations (from late-night pizza to beer to cafeteria food).

However, nothing tastes as good as feeling good. You can be gluten free at college.

Corn tortilla chips, salsa, hummus, sliced veggies, lunchmeat, string cheese, and fruitcups are all easy gluten free snacks to keep on hand in your dorm, and can be found everywhere.

Many of the Amy's brand frozen meals are gluten free, and these are really easy and delicious for a fast meal.

Thai Kitchen is another fast, (mostly) gluten free brand. Their instant noodle soup packets are like gluten free Ramen, and less than a dollar!

If you're near a Whole Foods, there are a multitude of products available there. Even "regular" grocery stores are stocking more (specifically) gluten free items. I really like Mi-Del animal cookies and Glutino pretzels. Van's frozen waffles are good too. They taste like I remember!

The cafeteria will always be a big challenge, unless you're one of the lucky ones with an enlightened food service staff (I wasn't among them).

The first thing you want to do is schedule a meeting with the head chef/meal planner, as well as the dietician. They will most likely lead you through the kitchen and discuss your various options, which can prove to be enormously helpful. However, it's the day-to-day food prep workers you have to watch out for. Most don't understand what it means to be gluten free, which will result in some awkward conversations until they understand what you want.

Cross-contamination is your biggest enemy. It will be EVERYWHERE in the cafeteria, which is why I moved to a dorm with a kitchen as soon as I could. I don't trust large cafeterias, because 99% of the food prepared contains gluten. It's near impossible to remain untouched from it in the cafeteria, and this WILL start to affect your health after awhile.

Good luck! If you have any questions or anything, feel free to ask :)

Kate

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I went gluten free right before the start of the school year--I live on a residential campus where there is no concept of commuting and where the higher ups in admin believe that everyone should eat in the dining halls. My friends and I started keeping charts; I never managed more than a week without the folks in our dining hall either forgetting to mark an ingredient (they're supposed to, by law, label allergens) or cross contaminating. Needless to say, I spent a semester hounding them, but the admin finally let me off the meal plan.

Our upperclass dorms have one kitchen in each of them; my dorm has about 60 students and one kitchen--and that kitchen's pretty perpetually contaminated. So I prepare all food in my room and if it has to cooked, it gets cooked in a covered pot or pan. (I'm thinking of picking up a crockpot or rice cooker, even both are illegal on my campus.)

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I found out a week before I started college that I had this. I was really lucky because my college was already aware of it and had already made steps to make sure that I would have food I could eat and were very helpful. I ended up moving off campus thought because even though they were very helpful it was too difficult to have to wait around for the food to be made when you had to run to class. Talk to your college about it or contact the food director, I am sure that tehy will be more then willing to help!

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I am fairly new to all of this. I was some what aware of what Celiac and eatting gluten-free were before, but only diagnosed officially with Celiac on Monday. I am hoping to start back up with college this spring semester. I am just going to take a class or two and make sure I am ok before I go back to the dorm life style and all. I want to know how you guys eat while at school/college. IT will be easier commuting because I can bring food from home, but what about when I go back to dorms. Also what kinds of make up/face stuff do you use, I been using some and getting rashes....doc said they prolly have some form of gluten in them. Make up, I usually get what ever is on sale or I have a coupon for. I use Clinque for face stuff, and their Happy perfume. Shampoos I get whats on sale. Living on a tight budget, so cheaper brands are perfered here, but willing to spend more for my health.

In addition to Celiac, I am a type 1 diabetic, have asthma (dx this past august), adrenal insufficiency/addisons disease, and hypothyroidism.

Personally, make-up and products along those lines don't bother me. It's only when I ingest food or liquid that contains gluten. The college I will be soon attending actually has a store that has vegan, organic and gluten free food. Otherwise, you should just really look around and read all your labels. I would recommend just buying something at your local grocery store and storing it in your dorm, maybe you have a mini fridge? It would help. Just a suggestion. I normally would just snack on fruits or some kind of granola bars. Just do some researching on some sugar & gluten free food. You would probably find quite a lot. :D Goodluck

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Hey there.

I've had Celiac basically my whole life..and am currently in my 3rd year of college. I agree with everything everyone has said above me. I actually found it easier to manage my food when I moved away from home, because I started preparing everything myself (not that my family wasn't a great support and watched out for me) I've lived in an apartment off campus since freshmen year, because the options I was given to help accommodate me by the university were not very appealing at all.

1. I would definitely talk to your disabilities center, they can provide you with documentation for absences and tell you what your dining options are.

2. Make sure your roommates are aware of the situation. You don't want them accidentally eating your crazy expensive food. If you are using tupperware or whatever in a combined fridge, make sure it is labeled with your name so they know which container of leftovers is theirs :)

3. Shopping for your own food is not nearly as complicated as it used to be, and even in the past year it has improved dramatically. A lot of products can be found in typical grocery stores and even some Walmarts now have an decent selection of gluten free products.

4. Many restaurants have gluten free menu's now..look online, call ahead, or just ask when you get there and they should be able to help you out.

5. Find a local GI if you are moving far from home. I don't go to the doctors often for Celiac, in fact, until last year it had been a good 9-10 years since I had gone, so when I did have an issue, it took a while trying to locate old GI records and getting them transferred to the proper people.

Those are the biggest ones I can think of off the top of my head. Hope everyone's having a great semester!

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I have just started a gluten-free diet and am struggling with the cafeteria. I have only been eating the fruit (bananas, oranges, etc all uncut with peels still in place so no cross contamination) and some raw veggies. I'm sure there's a good chance of cc with the veggies, but the caf is my only source for them as I don't have a fridge (my next work-study check may go to some appliances). I was supposed to meet with the food-service director yesterday, but he left early before I could get there (understandable on a Friday).

Outside of the caf, I have been eating a lot of fruit cups, Mott's applesauce, Lara and Clif bars, rice cakes (some Quaker flavored varieties are labeled gluten-free in addition to the plain lightly salted), Taste of Thai's pad thai and peanut noodles, Uncle Ben's white rice (I noticed today that some flavored varieties contain hydrogenated wheat), microwavable sweet potatoes from Wal-Mart and all sorts of stuff from the gluten-free shelf at Wal-Mart (I was raised a Target girl but that place is slowly growing on me). If you miss sweet cereal and cereal bars, check out the EnviroKids brand. Their products are directed toward little kids, but they taste great for snacks. I have also replaced my daily cup (or five) of coffee with Gatorade; half a bottle helps to wake me up and I'll water down the last half for some flavor later in the day.

It also helps to have friends who understand your problems. I've been dealing with some who are either incredibly insensitive or so sensitive as to not utter the word pizza in my presence. I have a couple buddies though who will scope out the menu and give me the odds before I even get there and will keep an eye out for something good when they're doing their own grocery shopping.

I just discovered this forum on Thursday and have learned a lot. I'll be back with advice from my trial-by-fire and inevitably some questions of my own.

Bridget

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I'm graduating in 2 weeks and I survived college eating better than my gluten-happy friends. My cafeteria really tried to accommodate me, but they kept cross contaminating things. So I cooked. In my residence hall we were only allowed a microwave. No ovens nothing. I talked to the housing staff and we came up with solutions to help me cook in my room.

All you need is a GT Xpress Redi Set Go, a Electric Kettle, and a microwave (a toaster oven would be nice if you can wing it)

Electric kettles can be used to cook noodles, mix with cooked meat and top with cheese. Microwave and you have instant pasta dishes.

In a GT Xpress you can cook omelets, pancakes, meat, pizza, fajitas, cakes, cookies, anything you can think of.

Also, there are tons of microwave recipes for cakes and cookies that can be made with Pamela's flour.

If you have a meal plan and you have to use it consider your salad bar. It's like a grocery store with your veggies washed and chopped for you.

Always talk to housing, dining, and student services. These people are there to help you, they have dealt with food issues before and can offer ideas, and will work with you until they have a solution.

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Outside of the caf, I have been eating a lot of fruit cups, Mott's applesauce, Lara and Clif bars, rice cakes (some Quaker flavored varieties are labeled gluten-free in addition to the plain lightly salted), Taste of Thai's pad thai and peanut noodles,

Clif bars aren't actually gluten-free. They are wheat-free but not gluten-free.

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I'm graduating in 2 weeks and I survived college eating better than my gluten-happy friends. My cafeteria really tried to accommodate me, but they kept cross contaminating things. So I cooked. In my residence hall we were only allowed a microwave. No ovens nothing. I talked to the housing staff and we came up with solutions to help me cook in my room.

All you need is a GT Xpress Redi Set Go, a Electric Kettle, and a microwave (a toaster oven would be nice if you can wing it)

Electric kettles can be used to cook noodles, mix with cooked meat and top with cheese. Microwave and you have instant pasta dishes.

In a GT Xpress you can cook omelets, pancakes, meat, pizza, fajitas, cakes, cookies, anything you can think of.

Also, there are tons of microwave recipes for cakes and cookies that can be made with Pamela's flour.

If you have a meal plan and you have to use it consider your salad bar. It's like a grocery store with your veggies washed and chopped for you.

Always talk to housing, dining, and student services. These people are there to help you, they have dealt with food issues before and can offer ideas, and will work with you until they have a solution.

Hey, this information is exactly what I was searching for! I'm heading off to college in the fall, and am probably going to live in a dorm that comes equipped with a kitchenette, but no stove. So I just wanted to thank you, this is extremely helpful in finding out what I can use in college to make food. I'm definitely going to have to experiment with cooking foods in the microwave!

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