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Gluten Digest Pills? A Cure Or Not Even Close?


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11 replies to this topic

#1 Harley0000

 
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Posted 06 December 2009 - 02:33 PM

Ok.... my brother in law is into holistic medicine gave me a bottle of these pills with the best of intentions.... They are NOW Gluten Digest. The bottle says they help digest gluten but the warning says in bold: If you have Celiac Disease - do not use unless under a doctors care.
I'm positive for Celiac (blood test and endo) so I am not trying anything without talking to my doctor, but as I'm sure you can all atest to..... doctors dont live it as we do so I'm not sure what to think. Will he have a clue or just say no?

I figured the best place to start to ask was here with all my fellow Celiac-ers :)

Anyone ever hear of these pills? Take them? Know anyone who has???

Thanks a bunch

Harley :P
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[font="Comic Sans MS"]I am 40 years old, married with 4 children. I was just very recently diagnosed with celiac disease (Positive blood test and positive endoscopy). Have a great gluten-free day :)[/size[/font][size="1"]]

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#2 AndrewNYC

 
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Posted 06 December 2009 - 02:37 PM

Your brother gave you repackaged snake oil.
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#3 Harley0000

 
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Posted 06 December 2009 - 02:43 PM

Your brother gave you repackaged snake oil.


ummm.. excuse me??????
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[font="Comic Sans MS"]I am 40 years old, married with 4 children. I was just very recently diagnosed with celiac disease (Positive blood test and positive endoscopy). Have a great gluten-free day :)[/size[/font][size="1"]]

#4 Wolicki

 
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Posted 06 December 2009 - 03:16 PM

That means that it would not be a good idea to try it. A pill to help you digest gluten cannot prevent the autoimmune reaction and intestinal damage.
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Gluten free is not so bad! If you are new, hang it there, it gets easier!

#5 Harley0000

 
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Posted 06 December 2009 - 03:38 PM

That means that it would not be a good idea to try it. A pill to help you digest gluten cannot prevent the autoimmune reaction and intestinal damage.


oh.. Thanks for the explanation. I had no idea what that comment was all about.
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[font="Comic Sans MS"]I am 40 years old, married with 4 children. I was just very recently diagnosed with celiac disease (Positive blood test and positive endoscopy). Have a great gluten-free day :)[/size[/font][size="1"]]

#6 emcmaster

 
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Posted 06 December 2009 - 04:24 PM

AndrewNYC was saying that those type of pills are essentially a hoax where Celiac is concerned. It would be like taking Lactaid if you have a dairy allergy (rather than Lactose intolerance).
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#7 jststric

 
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Posted 06 December 2009 - 04:30 PM

I'm sorry, but until something like Celiac, or gluten-intolerance is better understood----if not at least by the medical community (!) there will be no magical pill. What your brother offers is like the old-fashioned elixer that many took town-to-town that existed of nothing more than nice percentage of alcohol content. If it were that easy, don't you think every one of us would jump at the opportunity? It's just not that easy. At least right now. Hopefully, down the road someone will figure us out and come up with something that will actually help!! But it's not your brother, I'm sorry.
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#8 GFinDC

 
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Posted 06 December 2009 - 11:31 PM

Hi Harley,

This is a controversial topic on the forum. I used to be on the other side of this issue myself, but changed my mind after trying Vita Cost DPP-IV. The other posters are quite right, it is not a cure all and can't help much. However there is some evidence that DPP-IV can help digest some gluten in a lab environement. I don't know if there have been any tests on real people though.

I do know that it seems to shorten my symptoms duration some. So I take the Bio Core brand from Vita Costs when I think I may have gotten a little CC from something. I would never use it as a crutch to eat gluten on purpose, and I don't think the results of doing that would be at all good. I think it helps me a little, but a little is better than nothing IMHO.

I don't know of studies on people that would tell us if the stuff actually helps prevent damage. We really don't know if it prevents damage or makes things worse. For example, breaking the gliaden into smaller fragments may allow it to penetrate the intestinal wall more easily. That could be a bad, bad thing.

So it is something without a clear answer from medicine. I pasted in some research info from the Pub Med site, but it is only about testing in a lab, not in people. Also, they found 2 enzymes gave the best results when combined, aspergillus pepsin ASP and the DPP-IV.

So, I say try it but remember it is not going to let you eat gluten. It may possibly help a little to digest the stuff. But only small amounts, and it does not totally fix even the small amounts either. I am not a doctor or even in the medical field, so take what I say with a grain of salt. Or two.

DPP-IV A food-grade enzyme preparation with modest gluten detoxification properties.

A food-grade enzyme preparation with modest gluten detoxification properties.

Ehren J, Morón B, Martin E, Bethune MT, Gray GM, Khosla C.

Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Celiac sprue is a life-long disease characterized by an intestinal inflammatory response to dietary gluten. A gluten-free diet is an effective treatment for most patients, but accidental ingestion of gluten is common, leading to incomplete recovery or relapse. Food-grade proteases capable of detoxifying moderate quantities of dietary gluten could mitigate this problem. METHODS: We evaluated the gluten detoxification properties of two food-grade enzymes, aspergillopepsin (ASP) from Aspergillus niger and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) from Aspergillus oryzae. The ability of each enzyme to hydrolyze gluten was tested against synthetic gluten peptides, a recombinant gluten protein, and simulated gastric digests of whole gluten and whole-wheat bread. Reaction products were analyzed by mass spectrometry, HPLC, ELISA with a monoclonal antibody that recognizes an immunodominant gluten epitope, and a T cell proliferation assay. RESULTS: ASP markedly enhanced gluten digestion relative to pepsin, and cleaved recombinant alpha2-gliadin at multiple sites in a non-specific manner. When used alone, neither ASP nor DPPIV efficiently cleaved synthetic immunotoxic gluten peptides. This lack of specificity for gluten was especially evident in the presence of casein, a competing dietary protein. However, supplementation of ASP with DPPIV enabled detoxification of moderate amounts of gluten in the presence of excess casein and in whole-wheat bread. ASP was also effective at enhancing the gluten-detoxifying efficacy of cysteine endoprotease EP-B2 under simulated gastric conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical studies are warranted to evaluate whether a fixed dose ratio combination of ASP and DPPIV can provide near-term relief for celiac patients suffering from inadvertent gluten exposure. Due to its markedly greater hydrolytic activity against gluten than endogenous pepsin, food-grade ASP may also augment the activity of therapeutically relevant doses of glutenases such as EP-B2 and certain prolyl endopeptidases.
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Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul

#9 heidilyn

 
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Posted 22 October 2013 - 04:52 AM

this is a very debatable topic but i am celiac :(  and i go out to friends to eat every weekend sometimes they put gluten in  food they say there is nothing :wacko:  and this DOES help when i have small amounts of gluten by mistake :D . it DOES. it is enzymes, NOT A WITCH PILL. enzymes to help you  get more out of your good when you are allergic to it. it helps.  :)


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#10 kareng

 
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Posted 22 October 2013 - 05:04 AM

this is a very debatable topic but i am celiac :(  and i go out to friends to eat every weekend sometimes they put gluten in  food they say there is nothing :wacko:  and this DOES help when i have small amounts of gluten by mistake :D . it DOES. it is enzymes, NOT A WITCH PILL. enzymes to help you  get more out of your good when you are allergic to it. it helps.  :)

 

First, this is a 4 year old thread, so products and info may have changed.

 

At the International Celiac Disease Symposium last month,  I heard a doctor speak.  He is developing something like this but it is still a few years off.  They did study all the "gluten eating" products and found none of them worked very well.  A few were able to break down a small amount but no where near all of the gluten that was tested.  The only way they can help is if they break down the gluten, very very quickly - while it is still in the stomach.  Once it hits the small intestine, the reactions occur.


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#11 iloathegluten

 
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Posted 26 October 2013 - 04:23 PM

I've taken digestive enzymes any time I eat out as an extra precaution, and also because meals out, even IF it's 100% gluten free, tend to be high in things people with sensitve bellies tend have issues with. I think they're occasionally useful at making eating out a more comfortable experience for me, but they didn't prevent a major glutening that still has me sick now even months later. Unfortunately it was a direct exposure to wheat and put me back to my pre gluten free days. I took four of these pills before this meal (same brand you mentioned), so I can say with certainty they did NOT work at preventing a glutening for me.

 

I'd be interested to see how well they work for people who are only a little gluten intolerant. I have a friend who limits his beer and pasta consumption and seems to feel well enough he doesn't cut out all sources of gluten.


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#12 glutenmaestro

 
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Posted 04 November 2013 - 04:46 PM

Gluten fragments that cause celiac disease are resistant to digestion, which is why the problem occurs in the first place. No one can completely digest gluten. This has been discovered numerous times by experts and is well established in the literature. Sorry bud. :(


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