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Vegan Celiacs?


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29 replies to this topic

#1 bean

 
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Posted 05 May 2005 - 10:50 PM

Hello there. I'm Michelle and I've been a long time student of health/diet/etc. I recently read a book called "The China Study" and it has really rocked my world. It is based on one of the most comprehensive health/disease/diet studies ever done. It was started in 1983 and is actually still going on. This is the real deal too, done by *real* researchers - with 28 pages in the back of the book of peer reviewed journals documenting the studies and everything included in the book. It's basis is to move toward a plant based diet and significantly reduce risks for: cancer, heart disease, obesity, and diabetes. If you read the book, it's kind of life shaking.

So anyway, I kind of got it because I was somewhat "forced" into vegan world when I found out that I'm allergic to all components of milk, eggs, and (supposedly) beef. I'm not a PETA supporter or anything. I love animals but the health issues are what's leading me into this.

So I'm wondering - are there any celiacs out there who are vegans? How do you get the protein if you have troubles with soy along with the obvious problems with wheat (and TVP, seitan, etc.)? Does it even freakin' matter how much protein we get? I bought this rice protein powder yesterday (vegan) but haven't tried it yet. If anyone has any suggestions, please let me know!! Thanks :)
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Michelle :)

Positive blood tests 4/29/05 (tTG & IgA)
*Osteoporosis (at 32!)
*Heartburn/Reflux (*ouch!*)
*Lifelong battle w/depression
*Dental enamel didn't form right when I was little (cavities cavities cavities)
*Neuropsych analysis lists all sorts of learning disabilities - which may be attributed to brain injury from an old accident or may be from celiac, who knows!

Had biopsy May 11th, 2005 - villi are FLAT! :(
gluten-free since May 11th :)

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#2 celiac3270

 
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Posted 06 May 2005 - 03:33 AM

I'm not vegan, so I'm not going to be able to help you much on this, but I just want to say that health-wise it is very important that you get enough protein. Fat insulates and helps with nerve signals, carbs are the only thing your brain will use for energy (that's what's wrong with the low-carb diet...), but protein does basically everything else--muscles, most hormones, any healing that needs to be done, etc. The main problem that might arise w/ a vegan diet is that you don't get all the amino acids, since veggies only have some of the essential ones. So basically, with veggies, get a wide variety and maybe do a search on amino acids or amino acids vegan....

I'll inform a vegan/vegetarian/veggie (I don't know the difference, so I can't specify which one) of this post :)

Oh, I highly recommend the Clan Thompson booklets, see http://www.clanthompson.com/index.php3 ....they list verification date, phone number, gluten status, and vegetarian status.
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#3 astyanax

 
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Posted 06 May 2005 - 04:31 AM

some of my gluten-free food is also vegan - i guess they are trying to appeal to a larger audience. so definitely seek that kind of stuff out. i think my sister in law who's vegan eats a lot of beans. i know nuts have some protein. brown rice. hmm try doing an internet search for like protein + vegan + gluten free or something.

good luck ! report back with how it's going

btw vegan = no animal products of any kind (vegans who do this for animal rights reasons not health will also cut out leather products, etc.)
vegetarian = no meat

then there's like vegetarians who eat fish, vegetarians who eat chicken, etc. i forget what all those names are

i also met a kid once who was vegan, unless he'd hunted something

hope that helps you celiac3270 :)
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gXf since november 1998

#4 Guest_GFLisa0405_*

 
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Posted 06 May 2005 - 06:08 AM

Vegans eat no eggs,dairy products, fish, beef, poultry, pork (most even cut out honey-since its made by bees- and all animal products, like leather) lacto-ovo vegetarians eat no meat, but will eat dairy and eggs, lacto vegetarians eat no meat or eggs, but will eat dairy, and ovo vegetarians will eat eggs, but no dairy or meat. Semi vegetarians are those who add meat in once in a while, and pesco vegetarians eat fish (those these last 2 aren't really viewed as vegetarians by most vegetarians..). I was a vegetarian (id eat dairy, but no eggs meat, fish..) for a year up until 3 months ago. These are when my symptoms started developing for a gluten intolreance actually (i lived on cereal when i had to eat at the cafeteria..go figure...) and I really think it messed my body up, tho thats just my opinion. You really have to make sure you get eough protein, becaue it can have bad effects on you. The one thing about being on a vegetarian diet was that it prepared me for a gluten-free diet (always having to check labels and worrying about cross containmentation). I've noticed on these boards that there were other vegetarians who noticed a gluten intolerance, I have no idea if this will make sense but I had a theory. With a vegetarian diet you take out a lot of sources of protein (yes I know there are other sources, like beans) and having celiacs disease you're intolerance of the protein found in wheat, rye, barley, oats..(right?) so maybe theres some kind of a link. Also it seems like quite a few people start to have intolerances to soy, dairy, corn, eggs, nuts...all with sources of protein. Anyway, just a thought. If you do decide to go vegan, definately make sure you're getting enough calories and protein. You'll also ned to make sure your getting enough vitamins, ESPECIALLY b-12 and iron (vegans are usually deficient in these, and you'd be at even more of a risk because of being gluten-free)
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#5 lotusgem

 
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Posted 06 May 2005 - 07:51 AM

Hi Michelle,
I was a vegan for years; that's the way I cooked for the whole family. It has only been nine months that I've known that I had celiac. Actually, I think that being vegan helped me to figure out eventually, that I couldn't tolerate gluten. Almost every vegetarian book extols the virtues of whole wheat products. It was very frustrating, not to mention confusing to me that whenever I thought I was doing something so good and healthy by eating whole wheat foods, I would have awful stomach aches and gas for days!
Anyway, the question about getting adequate protein on a vegetarian diet, much less, vegan, is an old one. This concern is typically used by well-meaning friends and relatives to scare someone out of moving to a vegetarian diet. Here is an excerpt from, "Vegan Nutrition, Pure and Simple" by Michael Klaper, M.D.:"When meat and dairy products are deleted from the diet, 50% of total calories-including half the 'empty calories', as well as 70% of the protein, and 40% to 50% of the 'B" vitamins are eliminated. Calories should be replaced by increased portions of grains and nuts, and the protein is replaced through increased portions of grains, legumes and seeds." Now, somewhere I read that there is nothing nutritionally significant exclusively found in gluten-containing grains that can not be satisfactorily replaced by gluten-free substitutes. Dr. Klaper also explains that, "Most of the concerns over Vitamin B-12 adequacy in the vegan diet seem to be more theoretical than real, and most vegan people seem to grow and function very well without ever taking a Vitamin B-12 supplement."...."Therefore, because Vitamin B-12 deficiency, though unlikely, can be serious, and because the measures to prevent it are simple and essentially risk-free, all people using the vegan nutritional approach should assure that they ingest a reliable source of Vitamin B-12 at least three times weekly. (Vitamin B-12 fortified foods.) This is especially important for pregnant and lactating women, and growing children." If you were to choose to use a suppliment to take care of this requirement,
"The Vitamin B-12 needs of children and adults alike should be amply met by the equivalent of one 25-microgram tablet of Vitamin B-12 taken once weekly."
I hope that this is helpful, Michelle. This being said, (you'll scream!), since going gluten-free, I've gone back to eating meat and eggs, but not dairy, because I'm allergic to casein. It was already difficult enough to eat vegan, and I just didn't want the added burden of cutting out gluten-containing foods on top of that. I felt like I was running out of too many options. Now, if you can manage to be gluten-free AND vegan, then more power to ya! I'd have real respect. It felt like a healthy diet, and it's a blessing to know that you have not been the cause of killing in order to eat.
My best wishes!
Paula

:)
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#6 aaascr

 
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Posted 06 May 2005 - 08:55 AM

Michelle,
I eat a mostly vegan and organic diet, due more to allergies than anything.
Since beans and nuts are out for me, my protein intake consists
of quinoa, brown rice, sunflower/flax/shelled hemp seeds in various forms.
Initially, I didn't think I needed a whole lot of protein either. Particularly since I'm
late 40's age group. But....., I do need protein...., most everyone does! Especially so for me since I am still trying to be an athlete. I was devastated when, with the onset of celiac last year, I lost all of my muscle tone and strength.
After researching and "upping" my protein intake I have almost gotten back in condition.

I would agree that eating plant-based foods (without chemicals and pestisides) are better - for me anyway.
If you look on the web, you should be able to find a site that can calculate what
protein amount is correct for you. Then if you go to a "calorie counter" site, you
can find out how much protein is in a particular food. I don't have the particular sites but a search should give you some options.

Good Luck!
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alicia
been gluten-free 4 yrs.
too many food allergies to list!

#7 tarnalberry

 
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Posted 06 May 2005 - 09:16 AM

Adequate protein is important, and I would have to say that, while it should in no way be a problem getting adequate, complete protein on a vegan diet, I wouldn't say that it's a trivial question. Even though I do eat meat, if I'm not having soy, I do have to keep track of what I'm eating to make sure that there's enough protein. It's not hard, but it means being aware of your choices - picking quinoa or buckwheat over rice, for instance, as they are higher in protein. I say that based on the fact that I find it very easy to get too little protein in a day, even though I do eat meat! :-)

I believe the average recommendation for protein intake for someone who's not weight training or pregnant or have any other special needs is around 0.5 to 1g/kg of body weight.

(I don't follow a vegetarian or vegan diet because I don't eat soy every day - I may have a small sensitivity to it - and I tend to be hypoglycemic and find that I need too much protein in my meals to be able to do it without meat. I tried, as experiment, but without milk or soy, I couldn't even quite do vegetarian without getting symptoms.)
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Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy
G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004
Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me
Bellevue, WA

#8 bean

 
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Posted 06 May 2005 - 09:54 AM

Hey, please don't think I'm passing judgement on anyone who eats meat! I'm just wondering about this! I haven't even started the gluten-free diet yet so I'm dwelling in the realm of possibilities here ;)

I just want to hear about your experiences! :) I honor and respect all of you, whether or not you eat meat!

*hug*

- Michelle

Thanks to everyone who's posted so far :)
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Michelle :)

Positive blood tests 4/29/05 (tTG & IgA)
*Osteoporosis (at 32!)
*Heartburn/Reflux (*ouch!*)
*Lifelong battle w/depression
*Dental enamel didn't form right when I was little (cavities cavities cavities)
*Neuropsych analysis lists all sorts of learning disabilities - which may be attributed to brain injury from an old accident or may be from celiac, who knows!

Had biopsy May 11th, 2005 - villi are FLAT! :(
gluten-free since May 11th :)

#9 shimma

 
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Posted 06 May 2005 - 09:55 AM

Check out the Vegetarian Diet section of www.diet-portal.com. They have very interesting arguments regarding The Protein Myth.
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#10 dperk

 
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Posted 20 May 2005 - 06:38 PM

I have been a vegetarian for 30 years. I still consider myself vegetarian even though I did eat eggs, dairy and occasionaly seafood. I am having a difficult time with finding foods I can eat now. I have been gluten-free for 3 months. I can't eat soy, eggs or dairy anymore - I seem to have developed an intolerance. I also have problems with all starches and sugars. So the protein thing is a problem for me also. I eat black beans, rice, lima beans, seeds, nuts and corn (although the rice and corn may be a problem too). I have lost 30 lbs., and I'm very underweight right now. I'm having such a hard time finding foods to eat that I have considered eating meat. But I really don't want to. So any help with this subject would be appreciated. I am so underweight now that my family is getting worried about me. I MISS MY BOCA BURGERS!!! Did the vegetarian diet full of gluten as a protein source give me more damage (just a thought)?
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Debbie

#11 Carriefaith

 
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Posted 21 May 2005 - 06:29 AM

I consider myself a partial vegetarian. I eat some "terrestrial" meat, but usually only on special occasions, so like once a month or so (sometimes not even that often). The only meat I will eat on a regualr basis is fish. I also stay away from dairy due to my lactose intolerance.

I am also very interested in eating healthy to prevent serious health problems like cancer. I eat a ton of fruits and veggies. Apparently, brighter colored veggies and fruits are the most beneficial for preventing serious illnesses. For example, watermelon, blueberries, cranberries, broccoli, tomatoes... However, there are some exceptions such as califlower and cabbage which have anticancer proporties.

I personnally don't feel like I'm missing out on protein since I do eat beans (Heinz beans in tomato sauce), peanut butter, fish, and I drink boost and soy milk.
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Carrie Faith

Diagnosed with Celiac Disease in March 2004
Postitive tTg Blood Test, December 2003
Positive Biopsy, March 3, 2004

#12 blueshift

 
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Posted 25 May 2005 - 03:55 PM

I miss my soy burgers as well but they have tons of gluten..Meat just doesn't go through that easily. It goes down into my stomach and doesn't make any noise or bloating, but constipates me...

I do eat fish but still am searching..I have only been gluten free about two or three weeks and it is still early for me...still adjusting. Any word on hummus? Is it a no-no?
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blueshift

from Chicago suburbs near O'Hare

#13 jenvan

 
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Posted 26 May 2005 - 05:18 AM

Ck out this website: http://www.vegfamily...-vegan-diet.htm
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~~~~~~~
Jen
Indianapolis, IN

gluten-free since Feb 2005
dairy-free

#14 aaascr

 
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Posted 26 May 2005 - 07:06 AM

Though they are sometimes hard to find: Sunshine Burgers - the organic and regular burgers are soy and gluten free. They taste good too. I have had to request that Whole Foods and Harry's (atlanta ga) order them for me. When I can't get them I make Quinoa Burgers.
Basic mix:
Cooked Quinoa
Quinoa flour
egg replacer (ener g)
mushroom
onion
fresh ginger
salt and pepper
sunflower seeds - ground up
balsamic vinegar
agave nectar
(sometimes fresh garlic and/or cilantro)
Keep hands wet when forming patties.
bake for 20min 350 degrees in
glass baking pan coated with either
olive oil or coconut oil - they will stick!


Quinoa is fairly high in protein as are the Sunshine Burgers - plus they are
convenient if you cook n carry food.
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alicia
been gluten-free 4 yrs.
too many food allergies to list!

#15 dperk

 
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Posted 26 May 2005 - 02:17 PM

Hummus should be safe. But read the ingredient list to make sure. I usually make mine at home so I know what it contains. I have purchased the dried version at Wild Oats after reading the ingredient list and found it to be ok.
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Debbie




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