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Plantain Flour
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I went to this Asian market in my hometown for the first time ever. I saw some plantain flour and asked the cashier about it. He was extremely nice and said that he gets a lot of people asking if it had wheat in it - he said no. I also checked on their website and it says it is gluten free.

So I bought it, but have not even opened it yet. I am hesitant to use it though because I have no idea what it tastes like or what its consistency is.

Has anyone ever used plantain flour before? Any tips??

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Hi I'm probably no help at all but I am very curious. Have you found any recipes that call for the plantain flour? Or were you just planning on using it in your normal recipes? I would make sure to add some xanthan or guar gum to the recipe.

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The only thing I have found is on the box there is a recipe for "fufu" (plantain flour is also known as "fufu flour"). Fufu is a bread commonly served with soup. The box also says it works for breading and thickening gravies/soups

From the company's website:

Preparing Fufu:

Unlike the traditional method of preparing fufu, Tropiway Fufu Flour is very easy to prepare.

Simply add water to flour and stir into a paste in a saucepan.

Place over heat and knead with a wooden spoon.

Check for thickness and consistency. If fufu is too soft while cooking, add some more flour. On the other hand, if it is too stiff add a little bit of water.

I may try this, but I was wondering if there were other options.

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In the early 1900s banana flour was on of the largest exports from Hawaii, almost equal to sugar and pineapple. It just stopped about 1910 and now we cant find the flour at all. WOuld love to try some of this stuff!

The only thing I have found is on the box there is a recipe for "fufu" (plantain flour is also known as "fufu flour"). Fufu is a bread commonly served with soup. The box also says it works for breading and thickening gravies/soups

From the company's website:

Preparing Fufu:

Unlike the traditional method of preparing fufu, Tropiway Fufu Flour is very easy to prepare.

Simply add water to flour and stir into a paste in a saucepan.

Place over heat and knead with a wooden spoon.

Check for thickness and consistency. If fufu is too soft while cooking, add some more flour. On the other hand, if it is too stiff add a little bit of water.

I may try this, but I was wondering if there were other options.

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That sounds like like you don't have to add either of the gums for baking then. I will have to find some of this stuff.

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Here is my experience with plantain flour...

I've been working with it over the last year. I made a flour mix that is 1 part plantain, 1 part brown rice, 1 part sweet rice and 1 part tapioca. I really like the fine texture it gives muffins. I tried it in banana bread and cranberry nut, but I found them to be too dense and moist. I remade the cranberry nut bread with 1/2 of that blend and 1/2 regular rice flour and that was better. Not at all gritty. I should of however baked it a little longer--the center was still too moist. I used that same combo (1/2 of the blend and 1/2 regular rice flour) in cornbread and that came out really well. Not too dense and not crumbly and dry.

The first time I purchased it I bought it through Barry Farms. They have a recipe for pancakes and I tried it out. Didn't like it. The pancakes reminded me of whole wheat and were dry.

I also have a blend with teff, plaintain, tapioca and something else...I'd have to check. I wanted to try and get more nutritional elements into my flour mix. This mix produces tan colored muffins as you might imagine. But I've had great success in making banana nut, blueberry and raspberry muffins. I didn't try it in my christmas baking as some cookies are meant to be light in color. I think I'll whip up a batch of cocoa drop cookies with this flour tonight and see how it goes!

I think it is very likely true that no gum may be necessary. I'm going to omit it in my loaf (nut breads) next time and see how it turns out.

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Thanks for info Evie4,

If you feel like posting some recipes, that would be great. I have some green Hawaiian bananas drying now.

You guys got me inspired to make some flour!

Here is my experience with plantain flour...

I've been working with it over the last year. I made a flour mix that is 1 part plantain, 1 part brown rice, 1 part sweet rice and 1 part tapioca. I really like the fine texture it gives muffins. I tried it in banana bread and cranberry nut, but I found them to be too dense and moist. I remade the cranberry nut bread with 1/2 of that blend and 1/2 regular rice flour and that was better. Not at all gritty. I should of however baked it a little longer--the center was still too moist. I used that same combo (1/2 of the blend and 1/2 regular rice flour) in cornbread and that came out really well. Not too dense and not crumbly and dry.

The first time I purchased it I bought it through Barry Farms. They have a recipe for pancakes and I tried it out. Didn't like it. The pancakes reminded me of whole wheat and were dry.

I also have a blend with teff, plaintain, tapioca and something else...I'd have to check. I wanted to try and get more nutritional elements into my flour mix. This mix produces tan colored muffins as you might imagine. But I've had great success in making banana nut, blueberry and raspberry muffins. I didn't try it in my christmas baking as some cookies are meant to be light in color. I think I'll whip up a batch of cocoa drop cookies with this flour tonight and see how it goes!

I think it is very likely true that no gum may be necessary. I'm going to omit it in my loaf (nut breads) next time and see how it turns out.

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Thanks for info Evie4,

If you feel like posting some recipes, that would be great. I have some green Hawaiian bananas drying now.

You guys got me inspired to make some flour!

Ken, I made these chocolate cookies this evening. I meant to use my teff flour blend...but after a long day of work and cooking dinner...I totally forgot and grabbed my other blend. These cookies taste like a rich nutty chocolate brownie. Totally got the thumbs up from my gluten tolerant husband.

I'm going to try using more plantain and less rice flours (ratios) in the future. I'll try to remember to post if I hit on any promising combos. I also used this flour blend to make spekalatius. I must say, they are quite impressive (if you like that kinda thing). I'll have to write up the recipe as it was adapted from a (gluten) recipe.

Rich Chocolate Nutty Cookie Recipe

In a large bowl mix:

1 3/4 cups flour (blend equal parts plantain, brown rice, sweet rice, tapioca)

1/2 cup cocoa powder

1/2 teaspoon xanthum gum

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

In a small bowl mix:

1 egg

1/3 cup water

1/3 cup butter (I actually use 2:1 expeller coconut oil and ghee)

1 cup sugar (I use organic cane--the tan stuff)

1 teaspoon vanilla

Coarsely chop 1 cup pecans. I Also used pecan half for the top.

Add the premixed wet ingredients to the mixed dry. After thoroughly mixing, add chopped nuts. The dough will be VERY stiff. Scoop with teaspoon into balls about the size of a quarter. You can use your fingers to get it off the spoon onto the cookie sheet. Push pecan half on to dough, smashing it down. I molded the ragged edged with my fingers before baking. Bake for 6-8 minutes at 375 F. Remove from cookie sheet after one minute to cooling rack. I use parchment to bake on--you should be able to bake on ungreased cookie sheet.

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Thanks a million, this looks really good. I'm not a baker but use the flours for noodles, ravioli,

and gyoza type pot sticker things. Generally use a lot of buckwheat powder I bring back from Japan as I dont have much faith in the purity of the local stuff found here in Hawaii.

That with Tef and mochiko is pretty interesting.

My wife usually does the baking but has never tried spekalatius although does things with fresh ginger and tom sawyer mix flour thats really good.

take care

Ken, I made these chocolate cookies this evening. I meant to use my teff flour blend...but after a long day of work and cooking dinner...I totally forgot and grabbed my other blend. These cookies taste like a rich nutty chocolate brownie. Totally got the thumbs up from my gluten tolerant husband.

I'm going to try using more plantain and less rice flours (ratios) in the future. I'll try to remember to post if I hit on any promising combos. I also used this flour blend to make spekalatius. I must say, they are quite impressive (if you like that kinda thing). I'll have to write up the recipe as it was adapted from a (gluten) recipe.

Rich Chocolate Nutty Cookie Recipe

In a large bowl mix:

1 3/4 cups flour (blend equal parts plantain, brown rice, sweet rice, tapioca)

1/2 cup cocoa powder

1/2 teaspoon xanthum gum

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

In a small bowl mix:

1 egg

1/3 cup water

1/3 cup butter (I actually use 2:1 expeller coconut oil and ghee)

1 cup sugar (I use organic cane--the tan stuff)

1 teaspoon vanilla

Coarsely chop 1 cup pecans. I Also used pecan half for the top.

Add the premixed wet ingredients to the mixed dry. After thoroughly mixing, add chopped nuts. The dough will be VERY stiff. Scoop with teaspoon into balls about the size of a quarter. You can use your fingers to get it off the spoon onto the cookie sheet. Push pecan half on to dough, smashing it down. I molded the ragged edged with my fingers before baking. Bake for 6-8 minutes at 375 F. Remove from cookie sheet after one minute to cooling rack. I use parchment to bake on--you should be able to bake on ungreased cookie sheet.

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Wow- the chocolate cookies sound delicious! I think I will wait until after christmas and do a bit of experimenting in the kitchen. Thanks!!

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Thanks a million, this looks really good. I'm not a baker but use the flours for noodles, ravioli,

and gyoza type pot sticker things. Generally use a lot of buckwheat powder I bring back from Japan as I dont have much faith in the purity of the local stuff found here in Hawaii.

That with Tef and mochiko is pretty interesting.

My wife usually does the baking but has never tried spekalatius although does things with fresh ginger and tom sawyer mix flour thats really good.

take care

Ken here is the spekulatius recipe. I wrote it up last night as my husband insists I make them every year from now on. He is calling them Lebkuchen as they are very reminiscint of the very fine Lebkuchen in Germany...not like the "gingerbread" type most Americans are familiar with. I intentionally used more ground almonds than flour mix. Typically spekulatius are a bit more cookie than nutty if that makes sense.

I try to use use 2:1 expeller coconut oil and ghee in all my baking now. Coconut oil is cheaper and some ghee gives that delcious buttery flavor. There's a lot of text to the recipe, I really tried to describe the process as clearly as possible. Also, the recipe called for cardomom, I didn't have it so I put in a little dry ginger. They still came out great. Not sure if the will get hard...in which case I will put a sliver of fresh apple in with them.

Spekulatius

1/2 cup (ghee and expeller coconut oil)

1 1/2 cup almond meal/ground almonds

1 cup brown rice flour

1/4 cup potato starch

1/4 cup tapioca flour

1/4 cup sweet rice flour

1/4 cup plantain flour

1/2 teaspoon xanthum

3/4 cup sugar (I use organic cane)

zest of one lemon

1/2 tsp ground cinnamon

1/4 tsp ground cloves

1/4 tsp nutmeg (freshly grated)

1 egg (beaten with 1/4 tsp water)

sliced almonds (FOR DECORATING)

.

Mix dry ingredients in large bowl.

Mix ghee and coconut oil, add to dry ingredients by dropping small blobs at time into flour mix and stir intermittently. The idea is to create a mix like (cutting in) shortening for a pie crust. Continue mixing so that texture is uniformly crumbly looking.

In a separate bowl, beat the egg and water together. Add egg mixture to dry ingredients. Stir ingredients thoroughly. Continue to mix with your hands. Knead it until it has a uniform appearance. It will be coarse, but it should hold together. Divide dough in half. Form two rectangular flat pieces about 4" x 7" and about

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Ken...I miss my potstickers! One of the hardest part of going gluten free was knowing I couldn't go for dim sum anymore. If you have any recipes/tricks to share for making gluten free wrappers and fillings, I would be thrilled to get some! I wouldn't be able to use buckwheat flour as it seems my husband got hives from buckwheat tea the last time he had it.

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Much of the buckwheat tea I saw has barley in it so I've not had it in years.

Miss it on a hot summer day in Japan.

I usually use buckwheat and quinona flour mix for gyoza.

Usually make vegan ones with figs, feta and spinach.

Sometimes with whole buckwheat or brown rice filling.

I did buy and tree Bobs gluten Free steel cut oats last week so I;m wondering how that will be in a filling.

i'll have to practice again with the banana flour

take care

Ken...I miss my potstickers! One of the hardest part of going gluten free was knowing I couldn't go for dim sum anymore. If you have any recipes/tricks to share for making gluten free wrappers and fillings, I would be thrilled to get some! I wouldn't be able to use buckwheat flour as it seems my husband got hives from buckwheat tea the last time he had it.
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Much of the buckwheat tea I saw has barley in it so I've not had it in years.

Miss it on a hot summer day in Japan.

I usually use buckwheat and quinona flour mix for gyoza.

Usually make vegan ones with figs, feta and spinach.

Sometimes with whole buckwheat or brown rice filling.

I did buy and tree Bobs gluten Free steel cut oats last week so I;m wondering how that will be in a filling.

i'll have to practice again with the banana flour

take care

Ken, thanks for sharing that. I'm going to let my (Japanese) friend know, we shop together and she reads labels for me at the Asian store!

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Thats always a good idea.

Try and find Juwari soba4 if your at a Japanese market.

Thats 100% buckwheatr and gluten free and very tasty.

I've had a office in Tokyo for almost 30 years so I get spoiled but what I can get tehre and bring home to Hawaii.

Take care

Ken, thanks for sharing that. I'm going to let my (Japanese) friend know, we shop together and she reads labels for me at the Asian store!
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Thats always a good idea.

Try and find Juwari soba4 if your at a Japanese market.

Thats 100% buckwheatr and gluten free and very tasty.

I've had a office in Tokyo for almost 30 years so I get spoiled but what I can get tehre and bring home to Hawaii.

Take care

Ken, thanks for sharing that. I'm going to let my (Japanese) friend know, we shop together and she reads labels for me at the Asian store!
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The only thing I have found is on the box there is a recipe for "fufu" (plantain flour is also known as "fufu flour"). Fufu is a bread commonly served with soup. The box also says it works for breading and thickening gravies/soups

From the company's website:

Preparing Fufu:

Unlike the traditional method of preparing fufu, Tropiway Fufu Flour is very easy to prepare.

Simply add water to flour and stir into a paste in a saucepan.

Place over heat and knead with a wooden spoon.

Check for thickness and consistency. If fufu is too soft while cooking, add some more flour. On the other hand, if it is too stiff add a little bit of water.

I may try this, but I was wondering if there were other options.

Hi Summerteeth,

I know this post is really old, but did you ever try making the fufu? I found a flour mix called fufu in my international market today and I started looking for recipes and came across your post here. The fufu flour I saw was made from cocoyam and cassava flour. I found some very interesting info on fufu. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fufu Apparently it is used like bread in parts of Africa. I like to make African peanut soup and this sounds like it would be perfect to go with that. Was curious if you used the plantain flour to make fufu or any of these other recipes.

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Hi Summerteeth,

I know this post is really old, but did you ever try making the fufu? I found a flour mix called fufu in my international market today and I started looking for recipes and came across your post here. The fufu flour I saw was made from cocoyam and cassava flour. I found some very interesting info on fufu. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fufu Apparently it is used like bread in parts of Africa. I like to make African peanut soup and this sounds like it would be perfect to go with that. Was curious if you used the plantain flour to make fufu or any of these other recipes.

No I haven't... it is still sitting in my pantry. What is your recipe for African peanut soup?

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No I haven't... it is still sitting in my pantry. What is your recipe for African peanut soup?

I don't exactly have a recipe. I make it a little differently each time. The main ingredients that don't change are: chicken, tomato paste (or tomato sauce), peanut butter and some sort of peppers (bell peppers if you don't like it spicy or spicy peppers or even just a shake of red pepper flakes). The tomato sauce and peanut butter with a little heat make such a good flavor for the chicken. From there I add whatever vegetables I have on hand. I have done sweet potatoes, regular potatoes, squash, zucchini, okra, carrots, onions (almost always have onions). Here's a good basic recipe that sound similar to what I have made in the past: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/tanya-holland/chicken-groundnut-stew-recipe/index.html

I usually use boneless chicken though and cut it up and let it cook in the stew. I have done it on the stove top or in the crock pot all day and it's good either way. The flavor is even richer the second day. I alway make a big pot of rice to serve with it too. It's a very easy and hearty stew. You could make it vegetarian or with beef as well, but I like chicken the best. Anyway, when I made this in my pre-gluten free days I would serve it over rice or over biscuits. SO I thought this fufu sounded like a traditional biscuit that just happens to be gluten free. I did find in reading about fufu that western cultures have started to add wheat flours (especially semolina) to make their fufu, so I would not trust any finished product when traveling. Always check the ingredients.

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Yum that sounds really good... will definitely have to try it.

I ended up using some of the flour today because I made chicken in my slow cooker and thought that chicken & dumplings sounded good.

This flour is awesome! I am going to have to go back and buy more of it because the dumplings have no discernible "gluten free flour" taste that I seem to get with rice flour. They are a bit more gooey in comparison to the ones my mom used to make (with wheat flour). But all in all they were good, and my non-gluten-free fiance really liked them, too, which is a plus (he's not usually a big fan of gluten-free substitutions, but is always a good sport. I think he is scarred from a particularly disgusting foray with corn pasta).

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Yum that sounds really good... will definitely have to try it.

I ended up using some of the flour today because I made chicken in my slow cooker and thought that chicken & dumplings sounded good.

This flour is awesome! I am going to have to go back and buy more of it because the dumplings have no discernible "gluten free flour" taste that I seem to get with rice flour. They are a bit more gooey in comparison to the ones my mom used to make (with wheat flour). But all in all they were good, and my non-gluten-free fiance really liked them, too, which is a plus (he's not usually a big fan of gluten-free substitutions, but is always a good sport. I think he is scarred from a particularly disgusting foray with corn pasta).

Ooh, that is great to hear that it made good dumplings. I have not found a good dumpling or biscuit and I can't find the gluten-free Biquick in my area yet. Did you just follow the Fufu recipe above and drop them into the chicken mixture or did you use a regular recipe and substitute the plantain flour?

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I followed the recipe on the box of flour - it was 1/2 c of flour and 3/4 c water mixed together & then dropped in the liquid (I had cooked my chicken in the slow cooker and just ladled out some of the liquid into a saucepan because I wasn't sure how it was going to work - in retrospect, I could have just put the dough balls directly into the slow cooker).

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