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Plantain Flour


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23 replies to this topic

#16 Evie4

 
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Posted 23 December 2009 - 09:13 AM

Much of the buckwheat tea I saw has barley in it so I've not had it in years.
Miss it on a hot summer day in Japan.

I usually use buckwheat and quinona flour mix for gyoza.
Usually make vegan ones with figs, feta and spinach.

Sometimes with whole buckwheat or brown rice filling.
I did buy and tree Bobs gluten Free steel cut oats last week so I;m wondering how that will be in a filling.

i'll have to practice again with the banana flour
take care


Ken, thanks for sharing that. I'm going to let my (Japanese) friend know, we shop together and she reads labels for me at the Asian store!
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#17 kenlove

 
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Posted 23 December 2009 - 09:48 PM

Thats always a good idea.
Try and find Juwari soba4 if your at a Japanese market.
Thats 100% buckwheatr and gluten free and very tasty.
I've had a office in Tokyo for almost 30 years so I get spoiled but what I can get tehre and bring home to Hawaii.

Take care

Ken, thanks for sharing that. I'm going to let my (Japanese) friend know, we shop together and she reads labels for me at the Asian store!


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"Ryo tatereba mi ga tatanu"

If we try to serve both sides, we cannot stand our own ground.

Japanese proverb

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#18 kenlove

 
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Posted 23 December 2009 - 09:48 PM

Thats always a good idea.
Try and find Juwari soba4 if your at a Japanese market.
Thats 100% buckwheatr and gluten free and very tasty.
I've had a office in Tokyo for almost 30 years so I get spoiled but what I can get tehre and bring home to Hawaii.

Take care

Ken, thanks for sharing that. I'm going to let my (Japanese) friend know, we shop together and she reads labels for me at the Asian store!


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"Ryo tatereba mi ga tatanu"

If we try to serve both sides, we cannot stand our own ground.

Japanese proverb

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#19 GlutenFreeManna

 
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Posted 17 July 2010 - 02:56 PM

The only thing I have found is on the box there is a recipe for "fufu" (plantain flour is also known as "fufu flour"). Fufu is a bread commonly served with soup. The box also says it works for breading and thickening gravies/soups

From the company's website:

Preparing Fufu:

Unlike the traditional method of preparing fufu, Tropiway Fufu Flour is very easy to prepare.
Simply add water to flour and stir into a paste in a saucepan.
Place over heat and knead with a wooden spoon.
Check for thickness and consistency. If fufu is too soft while cooking, add some more flour. On the other hand, if it is too stiff add a little bit of water.

I may try this, but I was wondering if there were other options.


Hi Summerteeth,

I know this post is really old, but did you ever try making the fufu? I found a flour mix called fufu in my international market today and I started looking for recipes and came across your post here. The fufu flour I saw was made from cocoyam and cassava flour. I found some very interesting info on fufu. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fufu Apparently it is used like bread in parts of Africa. I like to make African peanut soup and this sounds like it would be perfect to go with that. Was curious if you used the plantain flour to make fufu or any of these other recipes.
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A simple meal with love is better than a feast where there is hatred. Proverbs 15:17 (CEV)

#20 summerteeth

 
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Posted 18 July 2010 - 05:26 AM

Hi Summerteeth,

I know this post is really old, but did you ever try making the fufu? I found a flour mix called fufu in my international market today and I started looking for recipes and came across your post here. The fufu flour I saw was made from cocoyam and cassava flour. I found some very interesting info on fufu. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fufu Apparently it is used like bread in parts of Africa. I like to make African peanut soup and this sounds like it would be perfect to go with that. Was curious if you used the plantain flour to make fufu or any of these other recipes.


No I haven't... it is still sitting in my pantry. What is your recipe for African peanut soup?
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Monica

dx celiac disease- November 1, 2008
dairy/casein free (much to my chagrin) for good- September 1, 2010

#21 GlutenFreeManna

 
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Posted 18 July 2010 - 05:54 AM

No I haven't... it is still sitting in my pantry. What is your recipe for African peanut soup?


I don't exactly have a recipe. I make it a little differently each time. The main ingredients that don't change are: chicken, tomato paste (or tomato sauce), peanut butter and some sort of peppers (bell peppers if you don't like it spicy or spicy peppers or even just a shake of red pepper flakes). The tomato sauce and peanut butter with a little heat make such a good flavor for the chicken. From there I add whatever vegetables I have on hand. I have done sweet potatoes, regular potatoes, squash, zucchini, okra, carrots, onions (almost always have onions). Here's a good basic recipe that sound similar to what I have made in the past: http://www.foodnetwo...cipe/index.html

I usually use boneless chicken though and cut it up and let it cook in the stew. I have done it on the stove top or in the crock pot all day and it's good either way. The flavor is even richer the second day. I alway make a big pot of rice to serve with it too. It's a very easy and hearty stew. You could make it vegetarian or with beef as well, but I like chicken the best. Anyway, when I made this in my pre-gluten free days I would serve it over rice or over biscuits. SO I thought this fufu sounded like a traditional biscuit that just happens to be gluten free. I did find in reading about fufu that western cultures have started to add wheat flours (especially semolina) to make their fufu, so I would not trust any finished product when traveling. Always check the ingredients.
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A simple meal with love is better than a feast where there is hatred. Proverbs 15:17 (CEV)

#22 summerteeth

 
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Posted 18 July 2010 - 03:57 PM

Yum that sounds really good... will definitely have to try it.

I ended up using some of the flour today because I made chicken in my slow cooker and thought that chicken & dumplings sounded good.

This flour is awesome! I am going to have to go back and buy more of it because the dumplings have no discernible "gluten free flour" taste that I seem to get with rice flour. They are a bit more gooey in comparison to the ones my mom used to make (with wheat flour). But all in all they were good, and my non-gluten-free fiance really liked them, too, which is a plus (he's not usually a big fan of gluten-free substitutions, but is always a good sport. I think he is scarred from a particularly disgusting foray with corn pasta).
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Monica

dx celiac disease- November 1, 2008
dairy/casein free (much to my chagrin) for good- September 1, 2010

#23 GlutenFreeManna

 
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Posted 18 July 2010 - 04:08 PM

Yum that sounds really good... will definitely have to try it.

I ended up using some of the flour today because I made chicken in my slow cooker and thought that chicken & dumplings sounded good.

This flour is awesome! I am going to have to go back and buy more of it because the dumplings have no discernible "gluten free flour" taste that I seem to get with rice flour. They are a bit more gooey in comparison to the ones my mom used to make (with wheat flour). But all in all they were good, and my non-gluten-free fiance really liked them, too, which is a plus (he's not usually a big fan of gluten-free substitutions, but is always a good sport. I think he is scarred from a particularly disgusting foray with corn pasta).


Ooh, that is great to hear that it made good dumplings. I have not found a good dumpling or biscuit and I can't find the gluten-free Biquick in my area yet. Did you just follow the Fufu recipe above and drop them into the chicken mixture or did you use a regular recipe and substitute the plantain flour?
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A simple meal with love is better than a feast where there is hatred. Proverbs 15:17 (CEV)

#24 summerteeth

 
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Posted 18 July 2010 - 05:33 PM

I followed the recipe on the box of flour - it was 1/2 c of flour and 3/4 c water mixed together & then dropped in the liquid (I had cooked my chicken in the slow cooker and just ladled out some of the liquid into a saucepan because I wasn't sure how it was going to work - in retrospect, I could have just put the dough balls directly into the slow cooker).
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Monica

dx celiac disease- November 1, 2008
dairy/casein free (much to my chagrin) for good- September 1, 2010




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