Jump to content



   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Could I Return To Having Wheat After Having A Baby?


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1 Liveenjoylife

Liveenjoylife

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 70 posts

Posted 22 December 2009 - 03:10 PM

I know after I went through hormonal changes at 28, celiac disease popped up. I do know that besides menopause women go through the most hormal changes in thier late 20's and like I said that is when celiac disease popped up. So, I am wondering if after having a child could my hormones go back to what they were before they changed on me and be able to eat wheat again. Even if I have celiac disease? No one in my family has celiac disease or any allergy symptoms to wheat.
  • 0

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 ENF

ENF

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 321 posts

Posted 22 December 2009 - 03:16 PM

No, Celiac is a lifetime condition,and you can't safely consume gluten. Science may one day develop something to change this, but for now it's just off-limits.
  • 0
Celiac diagnosis from positive blood work & endoscope (2005)

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 Subtype 2,8 (double Celiac genes)

#3 nmlove

nmlove

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 198 posts

Posted 22 December 2009 - 04:17 PM

Sorry, once it's "popped up" it can't be popped out. Good news is that if you're eating healthy, your baby weight should melt off pretty easily.
  • 0

#4 TrillumHunter

TrillumHunter

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 688 posts

Posted 22 December 2009 - 04:19 PM

Have you ever heard of the book Celiac Disease: The Hidden Epidemic by Peter Green, M.D.? It's very informative and might help you to understand why gluten-free is essential for life.

Also, unless every single aunt, uncle and cousin has been tested, I'll bet someone else has it.
  • 0

#5 tarnalberry

tarnalberry

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,542 posts

Posted 22 December 2009 - 05:38 PM

Nope, because it's not caused by hormones. Once your celiac genes have been triggered, no one knows of any way for them to be "turned off".
  • 0
Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy
G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004
Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me
Bellevue, WA

#6 Liveenjoylife

Liveenjoylife

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 70 posts

Posted 23 December 2009 - 08:38 AM

Have you ever heard of the book Celiac Disease: The Hidden Epidemic by Peter Green, M.D.? It's very informative and might help you to understand why gluten-free is essential for life.

Also, unless every single aunt, uncle and cousin has been tested, I'll bet someone else has it.


No, not every single relative of mine has been tested, but they all can eat wheat and not have any probs. If I got it from some where in my family, then the family member must of already passed. Ah well gonna have to continue to deal with it. Thanks all.
  • 0

#7 gfp

gfp

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,311 posts

Posted 23 December 2009 - 08:59 AM

No, not every single relative of mine has been tested, but they all can eat wheat and not have any probs. If I got it from some where in my family, then the family member must of already passed. Ah well gonna have to continue to deal with it. Thanks all.

Regardless you have had this since birth ...

The symptoms may have been masked for a part of that time but they were still in the background.

I'm male and didn't get symptoms until 27-28 when I got typhoid and my stomach never recovered however looking back the symptoms had been present since I was a baby and just disappeared in my teens.

You either react or you don't, a little like getting pregnant really. You either are or not, regardless of if you have got a pregnancy test back.

With celiac disease the reaction occurs, when we are young our villi repair faster than they are destroyed but they are still destroyed ... villi are not made to be destroyed so quickly so when they divide they increase amongst other things cancer risk. On top of that having the immune system constantly fighting what it thinks is a virus or bacteria can damage the immune system and thyroid.

Its conceivable you might start eating wheat and mask the symptoms for a year, maybe two but its unlikely and it will come back. Meantime you are still doing damage to yourself.

Incidentally the best ay to prevent the baby developing celiac disease if they have the genes from you is through breast feeding. If you eat wheat during this time you will pass some of the gluten to the baby.
  • 0
Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

#8 ciavyn

ciavyn

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 480 posts

Posted 23 December 2009 - 09:11 AM

You and I are on the same wavelength - where did this come from and how do I get rid of it?! :lol: Unfortunately, I think we are stuck. You might be surprised who in your family does have issues, but have no idea that they do. I always thought the overuse of the toilet in my grandmother's house (they only have one) was normal! After every meal, every one takes their turn, and it's not a pleasant aroma, let me tell you. I always got sick after eating, and so did my mother. My mother has had leaky gut syndrome all her life, but has NEVER told a doctor or anyone about it. I only know because I lived with her. People think what they know is normal until they learn otherwise. I thought everyone had bowel problems and it was normal to have pain in my stomach...until I learned from someone that these are symptoms, not normal.

But take heart - you will eat so much healthier, and enjoy food so much more. I actually crave my homemade soup (I've hated soup ALL my life), and my mashed sweet potatoes, and my gluten free chocolate chip cookies are pretty darned amazing. Nothing I eat tastes like plastic anymore.

Hang in there.
  • 0
Gluten free: Nov. 2009
Peanut and dairy free: Dec. 2009
Rediscovered dairy: March 2010 (in small quantities)
Peanuts added back: June 2010 (in small quantities)

#9 Ahorsesoul

Ahorsesoul

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,261 posts

Posted 23 December 2009 - 09:27 AM

No, not every single relative of mine has been tested, but they all can eat wheat and not have any probs. If I got it from some where in my family, then the family member must of already passed. Ah well gonna have to continue to deal with it. Thanks all.


Just because you do not think other family members do not have a problem with gluten does not mean they don't. This gluten problem can have no symptoms. It may show up years later with IBS, colitis, skin problems, bowel cancer or anemia (or many other problems).

I sure my dad has celiac disease. He'll be 90. I've cleaned up the toilet after he's used it. Looks like celiac disease to me. He doesn't understand why he can't control his bowels after eating pasta or bakery goods. So if you ask him if he has trouble with eating gluten or wheat, he will tell you absolutely not. He just knows he's always had this problem so it's normal to him.

Having a negative test does not mean a person does not have celiac disease or an intolerance.
  • 0
1960s-had symptoms-could have been before but don't remember
1970s-told had colitis or nervous stomach-was given phenobarbital, felt great but still had symptoms
Me, dd and ds diagnosed with Lactose Intolerance
2000-osteopenia
2001-had stroke because of medications I was given
June 2003-saw Chiropractor who specialized in nutrition: Celiac Disease not Lactose Intolerance, went gluten free with once in awhile cheating, off soy and dairy for about 6 months
June 2003-found excellent doctor for fibromyalgia (who has found out she has Celiac Disease)
May 2006-went gluten free with NO cheating-excellent! Made all the difference in the world

#10 nmlove

nmlove

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 198 posts

Posted 23 December 2009 - 05:44 PM

Not to mention that the number of silent celiacs are apparently higher than those with symptoms. But they still are at risk for "complications" of celiac disease. Crazy to think about.
  • 0

#11 Liveenjoylife

Liveenjoylife

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 70 posts

Posted 24 December 2009 - 08:11 AM

Just because you do not think other family members do not have a problem with gluten does not mean they don't. This gluten problem can have no symptoms. It may show up years later with IBS, colitis, skin problems, bowel cancer or anemia (or many other problems).

I sure my dad has celiac disease. He'll be 90. I've cleaned up the toilet after he's used it. Looks like celiac disease to me. He doesn't understand why he can't control his bowels after eating pasta or bakery goods. So if you ask him if he has trouble with eating gluten or wheat, he will tell you absolutely not. He just knows he's always had this problem so it's normal to him.

Having a negative test does not mean a person does not have celiac disease or an intolerance.


Yes I know gluten and celiac disease can be hidden as well! I am very aware of it all. I know blood tests don't always come back saying you don't have celiac disease when chances are people will. It's not legit. I have a huge family. So, telling them all to get in line to get tested is less than likely to happen. Your father probably does have celiac disease, but as you said what he goes through is obviously normal to him. When in actuallity it is not.
  • 0

#12 Liveenjoylife

Liveenjoylife

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 70 posts

Posted 24 December 2009 - 08:14 AM

Regardless you have had this since birth ...

The symptoms may have been masked for a part of that time but they were still in the background.

I'm male and didn't get symptoms until 27-28 when I got typhoid and my stomach never recovered however looking back the symptoms had been present since I was a baby and just disappeared in my teens.

You either react or you don't, a little like getting pregnant really. You either are or not, regardless of if you have got a pregnancy test back.

With celiac disease the reaction occurs, when we are young our villi repair faster than they are destroyed but they are still destroyed ... villi are not made to be destroyed so quickly so when they divide they increase amongst other things cancer risk. On top of that having the immune system constantly fighting what it thinks is a virus or bacteria can damage the immune system and thyroid.

Its conceivable you might start eating wheat and mask the symptoms for a year, maybe two but its unlikely and it will come back. Meantime you are still doing damage to yourself.

Incidentally the best ay to prevent the baby developing celiac disease if they have the genes from you is through breast feeding. If you eat wheat during this time you will pass some of the gluten to the baby.



Wheather I were to nurse the baby or not genes play a huge role. I could only hope and pray that my children do not get what we all go through. It is not fun by any means.
  • 0

#13 gfp

gfp

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,311 posts

Posted 24 December 2009 - 08:31 AM

Wheather I were to nurse the baby or not genes play a huge role. I could only hope and pray that my children do not get what we all go through. It is not fun by any means.


Genes determine if you can get it ... and without the genes you are not going to get it although we don't yet know exactly which genes sequences do and which don't outside of the DQ2 and DQ8.

However having celiac disease may not be fun but is certainly not a serious condition by itself once identified.

It is not a hardship not to eat wheat any more than it is a hardship not to eat live ants.
If you want to feel bad about not being able to eat live ants then you can, same goes for wheat. The difference is that is harder to avoid live ants in your food than wheat, even on a picnic.

People who have never tried heroine or crystal meth do not hanker after it ... we don't wake up thinking .. Oh I could just shoot some meth today ... and it is the same for kids really who never ate bread.

Hundreds of millions of kids have grown up, lived and died without ever tasting or missing bread... Pre-Columbian Americans did not wake up every morning thinking .. "Oh my Quetzalcoatl ! My life is so incomplete without something I have never heard of that my language doesn't have a word for but is a bit like maize".

People did not wake up in the night in 15C Europe and think OMG, I someone needs to discover potatoes.

If you think about it this way then its easy to think that celiac disease is no hardship ... avoiding being forced to eat wheat is the hardship!

Either way you can reduce the risk by breastfeeding whilst gluten-free.
  • 0
Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

#14 jerseyangel

jerseyangel

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,938 posts

Posted 24 December 2009 - 09:03 AM

Pre-Columbian Americans did not wake up every morning thinking .. "Oh my Quetzalcoatl ! My life is so incomplete without something I have never heard of that my language doesn't have a word for but is a bit like maize".

This is perfect! I think you should bronze it :D

But to the original question, I agree with the rest that Celiac is forever. It's ironic that childbirth can actually trigger the disease. I also had symptoms during childhood that seemed to disappear during my teens and early 20's. After the birth of my second child (c-section) I began to have symptoms again, and a bout with the flu in 2003 put me over the edge and I began to have severe, debilitating symptoms.
  • 0
Patti


"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

#15 Liveenjoylife

Liveenjoylife

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 70 posts

Posted 24 December 2009 - 10:07 AM

This is perfect! I think you should bronze it :D

But to the original question, I agree with the rest that Celiac is forever. It's ironic that childbirth can actually trigger the disease. I also had symptoms during childhood that seemed to disappear during my teens and early 20's. After the birth of my second child (c-section) I began to have symptoms again, and a bout with the flu in 2003 put me over the edge and I began to have severe, debilitating symptoms.



I got hit with a real bad virus when I was 25 and that affected my stomach and intestines, and had symptoms too, BUT they dissapeared as well, and didn't really take off till I had turned 28, I am almost 29 now. I was under severe stress which I know woke it up.
  • 0


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: