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Anyone Recover From Chronic Insomnia After Going gluten-free?


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#16 RiceGuy

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Posted 01 February 2010 - 11:33 AM

Char,
You didn't mention sublinqual B12 supplements but most people using this forum do. If B12 is absorbed by the colon, how does taking it sublinqually help?

The B12 we get from food is absorbed as it passes through the digestive tract. There are actually several steps which need to occur for proper absorption to take place. Eventually, the liver must convert it into a usable form. However, in the case of Celiac Disease, malabsorption apparently effects the absorption of certain nutrients more than others, B12 being one of the more typical ones.

That's when a sublingual form really helps. It gets absorbed directly into the bloodstream, and when taken in the right form (methylcobalamin being one of the best known), it doesn't require conversion by the liver either. So whether you're dealing with malabsorption, Pernicious Anemia, or liver problems, the sublingual B12 will bypass all of that.
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#17 jackay

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Posted 01 February 2010 - 01:37 PM

The B12 we get from food is absorbed as it passes through the digestive tract. There are actually several steps which need to occur for proper absorption to take place. Eventually, the liver must convert it into a usable form. However, in the case of Celiac Disease, malabsorption apparently effects the absorption of certain nutrients more than others, B12 being one of the more typical ones.

That's when a sublingual form really helps. It gets absorbed directly into the bloodstream, and when taken in the right form (methylcobalamin being one of the best known), it doesn't require conversion by the liver either. So whether you're dealing with malabsorption, Pernicious Anemia, or liver problems, the sublingual B12 will bypass all of that.

RiceGuy,
Thanks so much for clarifying this. It makes so much sense. I'll see if my doctor sells this and if not, I'll order some online. It will be interesting to see where I come out with my nutritional blood work because B12 (from what I've read) doesn't always show up as being deficient when tested because it draws it from the bones.

Are there other nutrients that are better off taken sublingually?
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#18 jackay

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 03:42 PM

i thought the b vitamins were responsible for energy and was surprised to read you take them so close to bed time. i feel like i haven't slept for 13 1/2 years now and hated when night time rolled around because i knew it was gonna be a looooong night. i don't want to take any sleeping meds but i will give the b vitamins a try. it would be so great to look forward to bed time and actually get a full night's rest!

bluebonnet,
Have you tried the B12 yet and had any luck with it?
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#19 bluebonnet

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 03:53 PM

@Jackay, Char and Bluebonnet – wow, it’s really fascinating that so many of us “gluten intolerants” have sleep issues. My insomnia has been so bad that it prevented me from going to grad school and I could only hold a part-time job, so needless to say, I feel for all of you! Thanks so much for your comments and suggestions. Around the same time I went off gluten, I also discovered I’m hypothyroid, as well as melatonin, vitamin d, zinc and b12 deficient, so this might be contributing to the insomnia as well… Just out of curiosity, do any of you have thyroid issues?

Thanks to all of you and sweet dreams!

i have hypothyroid. i am now 6 weeks gluten free and haven't had much change in the sleep dept. still hoping for some good zzzz's.
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#20 CHARBEEGOOD

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 04:39 PM

@Jackay, Char and Bluebonnet – wow, it’s really fascinating that so many of us “gluten intolerants” have sleep issues. My insomnia has been so bad that it prevented me from going to grad school and I could only hold a part-time job, so needless to say, I feel for all of you! Thanks so much for your comments and suggestions. Around the same time I went off gluten, I also discovered I’m hypothyroid, as well as melatonin, vitamin d, zinc and b12 deficient, so this might be contributing to the insomnia as well… Just out of curiosity, do any of you have thyroid issues?

Thanks to all of you and sweet dreams!



No thyroid problem as of yet...although with all the testing things can change! LOL Believe I still have 1 MRI to go to see if there is a difference on the grey matter since the B12 levels came up. Hope to wrap up the rest of the testings so that I can look at all the results.

Anyone else given Amitiza or Zelnorm?
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Char

#21 CHARBEEGOOD

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 04:45 PM

The B12 we get from food is absorbed as it passes through the digestive tract. There are actually several steps which need to occur for proper absorption to take place. Eventually, the liver must convert it into a usable form. However, in the case of Celiac Disease, malabsorption apparently effects the absorption of certain nutrients more than others, B12 being one of the more typical ones.

That's when a sublingual form really helps. It gets absorbed directly into the bloodstream, and when taken in the right form (methylcobalamin being one of the best known), it doesn't require conversion by the liver either. So whether you're dealing with malabsorption, Pernicious Anemia, or liver problems, the sublingual B12 will bypass all of that.


Riceguy..thank you. You said that so much better than I could have. Each Dr. tells his or her patients how to take the B12. I was injecting it for a few months and taking supplements. Once the levels got up, I was told to stop the injections and just take the supplements. They will continue to test my levels for a while to see if they change. Depending on the change, a rise or fall the treatment may be tweaked to compensate.

Good Luck.
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Char

#22 Lz_erk

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 08:14 AM

@Jackay, Char and Bluebonnet – wow, it’s really fascinating that so many of us “gluten intolerants” have sleep issues. My insomnia has been so bad that it prevented me from going to grad school and I could only hold a part-time job, so needless to say, I feel for all of you! Thanks so much for your comments and suggestions. Around the same time I went off gluten, I also discovered I’m hypothyroid, as well as melatonin, vitamin d, zinc and b12 deficient, so this might be contributing to the insomnia as well… Just out of curiosity, do any of you have thyroid issues?

Thanks to all of you and sweet dreams!


[No known thyroid issues on me.] I've had Non-24 symptoms since possibly birth, definitely since 13+. I went gluten free a year or two ago and have tried orthomolecular solutions, which helped with other things, but no effect on sleep.

I'm glad to hear your melatonin's been tested. Were you also tested for circadian rhythm disorders?
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#23 brandynickle

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 01:49 PM

The best thing I found to cure insomnia is vitamin B12. It makes total sense too, because B12 is vital for the production of serotonin and melatonin, amongst other things. These are critical for regulation of sleep/wake cycles, mood, energy production, and lots more. Also, those with Celiac Disease are very often deficient in B12, so there again it makes sense. I find I sleep quite well now, especially if I take the B12 about 30 minutes or so before I go to bed. The one I prefer is a 5mg methylcobalamin sublingual tablet made by Source Naturals.

Other nutrients are also helpful with sleep. For instance, magnesium is known as the calming mineral. And interestingly, people with Celiac Disease often have a deficiency of magnesium too. A co-enzyme B-complex can also be very helpful, as can a multivitamin/mineral, so I'd suggest these as well.


All of the things you say are true! One other thought is the Candida issue. My son wakes up in the middle of the night( and never seems tired at bedtime) whenever his Candida grows out of control. Our naturapath doctor treats him with an anti-fungal for systemic yeast and he is feeling right as rain. Just food for thought!
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#24 Skylark

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Posted 26 June 2010 - 01:54 PM

I started sleeping when I sorted out the psych issues, which requires gluten-free, fish oil, and lots of a high-potency vitamin/micronutrient supplement. If I get into gluten or slack off on the handfuls of vitamins and fish oil, I'm lying awake at 4am, anxious and deeply worried about something that would be trivial if I felt normal.
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#25 conniebky

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Posted 27 June 2010 - 05:04 PM

when I first went gluten free, I had insomnia bad for about a week...and I got the jimmy legs (RLS)....it stopped about about 2-3 nights.
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#26 missceliac2010

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 11:33 PM

RiceGuy~

I am finding this discussion of B-12 fascinating! I too struggle with insomnia. Nothing too terrible, I just wake a lot during the night and drive my boyfriend and myself nuts! ;) I had gastric bypass surgery 3 years ago (well before being diagnosed with celiac disease), and one of the vitamins I MUST TAKE is sub-lingual B-12. My bypass surgeon told me that it was because the location of the intestines being removed during surgery are responsible for B-12 absorption. Now I am hearing that the colon is the important spot. I wonder if maybe bypass doctors are just overly cautious? Regardless, I am going to start taking the B-12 at night! It can't hurt, and if it helps, I'll be thrilled!

One thing I have learned through the bypass surgery and now the Celiac diagnosis...the GI tract is a mysterious and complicated place. And right now, I'm mad at my GI tract! I can't seem to stop accidentally glutening myself, despite being very careful! Today it was raisins! Raisins?! I did some research, and it seems that only Sun-Maid guarantees their product to be gluten free, and the generic store brand that I bought (I'm cheap) might have been packaged on a conveyor belt sprinkled with flour to prevent sticking?! Crazy! I'll figure this all out eventually...I'd better, because I'm tired of having to wear loose fitting clothes all the time just in case I get glutenized and my gut looks like a pregnant budda belly! LOL!

Good luck on getting better sleep everyone! It's 12:30am here on the West Coast, and I am not tired... Ugh!


The B12 we get from food is absorbed as it passes through the digestive tract. There are actually several steps which need to occur for proper absorption to take place. Eventually, the liver must convert it into a usable form. However, in the case of Celiac Disease, malabsorption apparently effects the absorption of certain nutrients more than others, B12 being one of the more typical ones.

That's when a sublingual form really helps. It gets absorbed directly into the bloodstream, and when taken in the right form (methylcobalamin being one of the best known), it doesn't require conversion by the liver either. So whether you're dealing with malabsorption, Pernicious Anemia, or liver problems, the sublingual B12 will bypass all of that.


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Heather C.
July, 2010: Diagnosed with Celiac Disease via elimination diet and strong Lactose Intolerance via blood work. My symptoms of glutening include 1. extreme abdominal distention, 2. severe abdominal pain, 3. gas, 4. mood swings/generally negative and unpleasant to be around!

#27 Grace'smom

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 04:47 PM

@Jackay, Char and Bluebonnet – wow, it’s really fascinating that so many of us “gluten intolerants” have sleep issues. My insomnia has been so bad that it prevented me from going to grad school and I could only hold a part-time job, so needless to say, I feel for all of you! Thanks so much for your comments and suggestions. Around the same time I went off gluten, I also discovered I’m hypothyroid, as well as melatonin, vitamin d, zinc and b12 deficient, so this might be contributing to the insomnia as well… Just out of curiosity, do any of you have thyroid issues?

Thanks to all of you and sweet dreams!


Hi Carrie,

My daughter has celiac, and she also has hypo thyroid-ism. I wanted to comment on your question about Levoxyl being gluten free. It most definitely is, as I checked with a pharmacist who looked it up, and it was actually labeled as gluten free so you are ok there. And as far as the hypo-thyroid issue goes, I googled the question "is there a link between thyroid and celiac disease" and read some research that yes there was a study done, and the findings were that untreated celiac disease was believed to be the driving cause of thyroid problems. I'm curious now that my daughter has been gluten free for 2 mos. if after a year, her thyroid levels will normalize and she won't need Levoxyl any more. I guess that could be the one positive about the celiac diagnosis! Best of luck to you hon and I hope you start sleeping. When she was first diagnosed she had trouble sleeping and I gave her a very small dose of melatonin for a few nights and it did help her fall asleep and stay asleep. They carry it at any health store. You might give it a try if your symptoms persist. Life is so much better on sleep, as the mother of 5 young kids I can empathize on the lack of sleep!! - Emily
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#28 oceansparkle

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Posted 26 August 2010 - 07:16 PM

After about two years of gluten-free my insomnia is MUCH better. Great idea on the B12! I'm going to try it tonight! Thanks!

The best thing I found to cure insomnia is vitamin B12. It makes total sense too, because B12 is vital for the production of serotonin and melatonin, amongst other things. These are critical for regulation of sleep/wake cycles, mood, energy production, and lots more. Also, those with Celiac Disease are very often deficient in B12, so there again it makes sense. I find I sleep quite well now, especially if I take the B12 about 30 minutes or so before I go to bed. The one I prefer is a 5mg methylcobalamin sublingual tablet made by Source Naturals.

Other nutrients are also helpful with sleep. For instance, magnesium is known as the calming mineral. And interestingly, people with Celiac Disease often have a deficiency of magnesium too. A co-enzyme B-complex can also be very helpful, as can a multivitamin/mineral, so I'd suggest these as well.


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Diagnosed as gluten-intolerant by Doctor and Nutritionist via an elimination diet in June, 2008. Am gluten free and organic as much as possible! Refuse to undergo stomach biopsy process. Highly allergic/intolerant to MALT, MSG, maltodextrin, nitrates/nitrites. Currently identifying previously hidden allergies to shellfish and skin products containing gluten or cereal derivatives. 14-yo son is also gluten free and organic! LONG history with doctors and multiple misdiagnoses...

I become very emotional when I dwell on all the "life" I've missed due to years of gluten-induced illness, but I'm healthier and happier every day now - for which I am truly, truly grateful.

#29 oceansparkle

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Posted 27 August 2010 - 04:56 AM

when I first went gluten free, I had insomnia bad for about a week...and I got the jimmy legs (RLS)....it stopped about about 2-3 nights.


Oh my gosh! RLS? Wow! I had that too, for about a month, then it went away. Talk about a freaky feeling! Kicked my sleeping cat off the bed a couple of times. Yikes! I had been gluten free (or so I thought) for about 18 months when this started happening - I have since gotten much stricter about trace gluten in items such as makeup, etc. Much better now!
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Diagnosed as gluten-intolerant by Doctor and Nutritionist via an elimination diet in June, 2008. Am gluten free and organic as much as possible! Refuse to undergo stomach biopsy process. Highly allergic/intolerant to MALT, MSG, maltodextrin, nitrates/nitrites. Currently identifying previously hidden allergies to shellfish and skin products containing gluten or cereal derivatives. 14-yo son is also gluten free and organic! LONG history with doctors and multiple misdiagnoses...

I become very emotional when I dwell on all the "life" I've missed due to years of gluten-induced illness, but I'm healthier and happier every day now - for which I am truly, truly grateful.

#30 Tidings

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Posted 10 September 2010 - 06:19 PM

How much B12 is needed by people with celiac/insomnia, to get relief and sleep?

I've been taking B12 (not sublingual) for years, along with B6 and Folic Acid (and several other health supplements), for eye support to offset glaucoma. I take it in the morning, not at night, and it's 500mcg. I think I read somewhere that this form of B12, cyanocobalamin, might not be the best? Is there a better form? Maybe I should take the B12 at night instead of (or in addition to) the 500mcg in the morn?

Any suggestions are appreciated. Thanks.

P.S. Just rescanned this thread and found RiceGuy's comment "when taken in the right form (methylcobalamin being one of the best known), it doesn't require conversion by the liver." Does anyone have a brand they can recommend and is it much more costly than the more common cyanocobalamin?
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