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Gluten Sensitivity-Celiac Disease Research


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#1 happygirl

 
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Posted 10 January 2010 - 05:19 PM

Italics added by me.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....um&ordinalpos=1

Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2009 Nov 24;152(1):75-80. [Epub ahead of print]

Differential Mucosal IL-17 Expression in Two Gliadin-Induced Disorders: Gluten Sensitivity and the Autoimmune Enteropathy Celiac Disease.
Sapone A, Lammers KM, Mazzarella G, Mikhailenko I, Carteń M, Casolaro V, Fasano A.

Sezione Biotecnologia e Biologia Molecolare, Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale, Seconda Università degli Studi di Napoli, Naples, Italy.

Background: The immune-mediated enteropathy, celiac disease (celiac disease), and gluten sensitivity (GS) are two distinct clinical conditions that are both triggered by the ingestion of wheat gliadin. celiac disease, but not GS, is associated with and possibly mediated by an autoimmune process. Recent studies show that gliadin may induce the activation of IL-17-producing T cells and that IL-17 expression in the celiac disease mucosa correlates with gluten intake. Methods: The small-intestinal mucosa of patients with celiac disease and GS and dyspeptic controls was analyzed for expression of IL-17A mRNA by quantitative RT-PCR. The number of CD3+ and TCR-gammadelta lymphocytes and the proportion of CD3+ cells coexpressing the Th17 marker CCR6 were examined by in situ small-intestinal immunohistochemistry. Results: Mucosal expression of IL-17A was significantly increased in celiac disease but not in GS patients, compared to controls. This difference was due to enhanced IL-17A levels in >50% of celiac disease patients, with the remainder expressing levels similar to GS patients or controls, and was paralleled by a trend toward increased proportions of CD3+CCR6+ cells in intestinal mucosal specimens from these subjects. Conclusion: We conclude that GS, albeit gluten-induced, is different from celiac disease not only with respect to the genetic makeup and clinical and functional parameters, but also with respect to the nature of the immune response. Our findings also suggest that two subgroups of celiac disease, IL-17-dependent and IL-17-independent, may be identified based on differential mucosal expression of this cytokine. Copyright © 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

PMID: 19940509 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
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