Jump to content





   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Is This Iga Deficiency?


  • Please log in to reply

7 replies to this topic

#1 mbridget

 
mbridget

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
 

Posted 11 January 2010 - 11:12 PM

had blood tests ran to check for celiac disease because I have countless symptoms that point to that. When I got my results back I has shocked that my IGA levels were so low. Is this IGA deficiency?

TISSUE TRAN IGA: 0.7 U/mL


**Lab ranges are: Negative <4.0
Equivocal 4.0 to 10.0
Positive >10.0

My IGG level was low also

TISSUE TRAN IGG 1.7 U/mL

**Lab ranges : negative <6.0
equivocal 6.0 to 9.0
positive >9.0
  • 0
Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA: 29 Units
Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA: 16 Units
Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: Less than 300 Units
Fecal Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA: 15 Units
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1: 0201
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2: 0602
Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,1 (Subtype 2,6)

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 JennyC

 
JennyC

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,013 posts
 

Posted 12 January 2010 - 03:37 PM

The tests that were run were for tissue transglutaminase antibodies, for both IgG and IgA antibody classes. Both of the tests are for celiac disease. You did not post any tests regarding antibody deficiency. A test for IgA deficiency would likely be called "IgA toal" or just "IgA."
  • 0
Jenny

Son 6 yrs old, Positive blood work, Outstanding dietary response, no biopsy.
Household mostly gluten free since 3/07

Me: HLA-DQ 02 & 0302 (DQ 08), which I ran & analyzed myself!Currently gluten lite, negative tTG, asymptomatic

#3 mbridget

 
mbridget

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
 

Posted 12 January 2010 - 04:17 PM

The tests that were run were for tissue transglutaminase antibodies, for both IgG and IgA antibody classes. Both of the tests are for celiac disease. You did not post any tests regarding antibody deficiency. A test for IgA deficiency would likely be called "IgA toal" or just "IgA."



This is all they tested me for and all the lab gave me when I got my copy of the report. HELP! Now Im really confused. There is so much to learn!
  • 0
Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA: 29 Units
Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA: 16 Units
Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: Less than 300 Units
Fecal Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA: 15 Units
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1: 0201
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2: 0602
Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,1 (Subtype 2,6)

#4 mushroom

 
mushroom

    Mushroom

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,448 posts
 

Posted 12 January 2010 - 04:33 PM

This is all they tested me for and all the lab gave me when I got my copy of the report. HELP! Now Im really confused. There is so much to learn!

The full celiac blood panel is considered to be:

Anti-Gliadin (AGA) IgA
Anti-Gliadin (AGA) IgG
Anti-Endomysial (EMA) IgA
Anti-Tissue Transglutaminase (tTG) IgA
Total Serum IgA

Plus there is a newly developed test called Deaminated Gliadin Peptides (DGP) just to confuse you further.

Many doctors do not order the full panel for some reason. The tTG and EMA are I believe considered to be the two most useful, but generally a total serum IGA is necessary to be run as a control to determine that you are in fact producing antibodies. If the total serum IGA is really low, it can invalidate the other celiac tests. It is all very complicated. Of course, if your results are positive, the total serum IGA control is irrelevant, but if they are negative it would be useful to have this test run
  • 0
Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#5 mbridget

 
mbridget

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
 

Posted 12 January 2010 - 04:49 PM

The full celiac blood panel is considered to be:

Anti-Gliadin (AGA) IgA
Anti-Gliadin (AGA) IgG
Anti-Endomysial (EMA) IgA
Anti-Tissue Transglutaminase (tTG) IgA
Total Serum IgA

Plus there is a newly developed test called Deaminated Gliadin Peptides (DGP) just to confuse you further.

Many doctors do not order the full panel for some reason. The tTG and EMA are I believe considered to be the two most useful, but generally a total serum IGA is necessary to be run as a control to determine that you are in fact producing antibodies. If the total serum IGA is really low, it can invalidate the other celiac tests. It is all very complicated. Of course, if your results are positive, the total serum IGA control is irrelevant, but if they are negative it would be useful to have this test run



This is all so frustrating. I feel like I had to really push to get these tests and now it seems that I STILL dont have a valid answer! I went ahead and ordered a full panel from Enterolab.


Oddly my GI told me that the blood test said without a doubt "No Celiac" and yet today I get a letter from his office that says that I should go off gluten, dairy and simple sugars as this may help allieviate my symptoms. THANKS! I can figure that out all by myself and save a couple hundred dollars in the process!
  • 0
Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA: 29 Units
Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA: 16 Units
Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: Less than 300 Units
Fecal Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA: 15 Units
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1: 0201
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2: 0602
Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,1 (Subtype 2,6)

#6 mushroom

 
mushroom

    Mushroom

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,448 posts
 

Posted 12 January 2010 - 05:12 PM

Don't discount the possibility that you are gluten intolerant/sensitive, rather than full-blown celiac. The treatment is the same for either condition, i.e., a gluten free diet, which is probably why your GI told you to avoid gluten, dairy and sugars. The dairy is because gluten damages the villi in your small intestine where the lactase is produced to digest the lactose (sugar) in milk, etc., the sugar because there is a possible yeast overgrowth in the bowel which is quite common with gluten sensitivity. You may also be intolerant of casein, which is the protein in dairy. You will have to experiment to see if you can eat cultured dairy products where most of the lactose has been pre-digested--yogurt, hard cheese, sour cream were all okay for me. Or, of course you may not be lactose intolerant at all.

The best test at this point to find out if you are gluten intolerant is to do do as the doctor suggested. :) See if you feel better, and if you do, challenge the dairy and sugar after a week or two to see if you need to continue avoiding them as well. Your GI really should have given you a little more information :rolleyes: about his recommendations :(
  • 0
Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#7 nora_n

 
nora_n

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,489 posts
 

Posted 13 January 2010 - 02:22 PM

Most places in Europe they just automatically run the total IgA when doing celiac tests.
I think the lab has really bad routines when they do not do that automatically.

also, the enterolab antibody tests in the fecal tests are IgA based and in case of IgA deficiency they will be negative.
But the fecal fat test will probably be high, and usually but not always the gene test will be positive.
(but there are several people here with other genes)

I do not have a diagnosis but I am totally gluten free and I get DH rash from just traces of gluten, and some ataxia symptoms. I need no more proof. (only my doctor does but that is another story)
  • 0
gluten-free since may 06 after neg. biopsy symptoms went away and DH symptoms which I had since 03 got gradually better.
daughter officially diagnosed celiac and casein intolerant.
non-DQ2 or DQ8. Maybe DQ1? Updated: Yes, double DQ5
Hypothyroid since 2000, thyroxine first started to work well 06 on a low-carb and gluten-free diet
Lost 20 kg after going gluten-free and weighing 53 kg now. neg. biopsy for DH. Found out afterwards from this forum that it should have been taken during an outbreak but it was taken two weeks after. vitaminD was 57 nmol/l in may08)

#8 mbridget

 
mbridget

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
 

Posted 13 January 2010 - 10:36 PM

Thank you everyone for all of your help and suggestions. I am at Day 18 gluten free (at least intentionally) and I am not sure if I feel different yet or not. I suspect that the soy and dairy I am ingesting may be stalling my progress. I am going to start to work on that.
  • 0
Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA: 29 Units
Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA: 16 Units
Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: Less than 300 Units
Fecal Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA: 15 Units
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1: 0201
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2: 0602
Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,1 (Subtype 2,6)




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: