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How Long Til Things Are Back To Normal?


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#1 eko413

 
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Posted 18 January 2010 - 07:18 PM

Hi everyone, I'm so glad I found this forum...

I'm 23 years old and I was just diagnosed the week before Thanksgiving. Being right before the holidays, the timing wasn't ideal, but I was actually really excited to FINALLY know what was wrong with me. I was super-optimistic about going gluten free and have been very careful about sticking to my diet. I had a couple slip-ups early on, but I've learned from them and I've even ditched my beloved Aveeno lotion and switched shampoos. I've been dairy free for about a week, and I started taking a probiotic right after the new year.

My symptoms are daily D and brain fog. Since going gluten free I have had 2 days were I felt better. Do you think I'm still getting gluten from somewhere? Or could I have other intolerances I just haven't discovered yet? Or am I just being impatient? I get discouraged when I read about people who felt better right away...but then again we all heal differently. Did it take anyone else months to feel better?

Thanks for listening. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. I don't know any other celiacs...it's so good to be able to talk about this with people who "get it."

-Erin
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#2 AndrewNYC

 
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Posted 18 January 2010 - 07:44 PM

Brain fog: 4-6 months to clear.

Stomach problems: depends on your level of determination. You are well advised to eat a totally natural diet, no processed foods, and to start at a very basic level and go from there. Start with plain cooked brown rice for two days. If stomach is okay then add plain chicken for two days. If stomach is still okay then add potato...


Hi everyone, I'm so glad I found this forum...

I'm 23 years old and I was just diagnosed the week before Thanksgiving. Being right before the holidays, the timing wasn't ideal, but I was actually really excited to FINALLY know what was wrong with me. I was super-optimistic about going gluten free and have been very careful about sticking to my diet. I had a couple slip-ups early on, but I've learned from them and I've even ditched my beloved Aveeno lotion and switched shampoos. I've been dairy free for about a week, and I started taking a probiotic right after the new year.

My symptoms are daily D and brain fog. Since going gluten free I have had 2 days were I felt better. Do you think I'm still getting gluten from somewhere? Or could I have other intolerances I just haven't discovered yet? Or am I just being impatient? I get discouraged when I read about people who felt better right away...but then again we all heal differently. Did it take anyone else months to feel better?

Thanks for listening. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. I don't know any other celiacs...it's so good to be able to talk about this with people who "get it."

-Erin


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#3 flowerchild

 
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Posted 18 January 2010 - 08:52 PM

Erin,
Best of luck to you! Wish I'd found out in my 20's. After many years of supposed "IBS", it took probably 3 months before the D resolved itself. Don't worry - good times are ahead. Now I never ever get D unless I've been glutened - then the cramping etc. comes back with a vengeance. It's good to stay off dairy for awhile til you're healed - and wholesome foods are always good. I found I had trouble eating raw vegetables at first, but after cooking them for a few months I love my salads now. Just treat yourself as though you're recovering from a long and serious illness and give it time.

Be sure to check your soy sauce, salad dressings, OTC and presription pills, and lipstick - those are common culprits. I've learned to stay away from marinated meats and prepared soups and salads unless someone can positively identify the ingredients for me. Even those chicken chunks you put on your salad sometimes contain soy sauce and other forms of gluten. Read anything that comes out of a freezer bag - even something as innocent as frozen carrots - ya just never know.
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#4 sandsurfgirl

 
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Posted 18 January 2010 - 10:53 PM

I think it might be the dairy. It takes awhile for dairy to get out of your system so 2 weeks free of it might mean you need a bit more time. With intestinal damage like we all have dairy is tough. Look for hidden dairy in things too and just get off dairy entirely. I would avoid soy too. It's not fun, but your body needs healing. When you are healed, then you can try it in moderation.
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Lots of doctors diagnosed me with lots of things including IBS, lactose intolerance, wheat intolerance, and quite a few of them threw up their hands in total confusion.

Had GI symptoms, allergy symptoms and unexplained illness my whole life.

Jan. 2010 Diagnosed celiac at the age of 40.
Ready to get well and get on with my life!

#5 eko413

 
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Posted 19 January 2010 - 08:39 AM

Thanks for all the encouraging feedback. I'll stay off the dairy a little longer and try cutting out soy too. It's tricky--dairy and soy pop up in all kinds of unexpected things. It's really tough being in grad school and missing out on group lunches, happy hours, etc. Plus I'm so anxious to snap out of the fogginess so I can concentrate on finishing my thesis!

Thanks again for the support!
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#6 gabby

 
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Posted 19 January 2010 - 09:08 AM

Be sure to throw out your old lipsticks, chapsticks, lipglosses and anything else that you put on your lips before going gluten free. If you are anything like me, then you probably used to routinely eat a sandwich or donut or pizza, then just pull out your lipstick/gloss/chapstick and reapply without even thinking about it....and thus getting little itty bits of gluten all over them.

Also, be sure to buy a new toothbrush and toothpaste and any other thing that routinely goes into your mouth (if you have braces or retainers be sure to buy new cleaning brushes too).
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#7 happygirl

 
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Posted 19 January 2010 - 09:12 AM

Good luck! I was diagnosed during grad school .... it is tough to juggle it all.

If you weren't already tested, you may want to talk to your doctor about vitamin/mineral deficiencies that are common among people with Celiac (especially when you are undiagnosed/just starting the diet) because of malabsorption.

Immodium can help cut down on some of your symptoms. Hang in there!
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#8 rahga

 
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Posted 19 January 2010 - 06:52 PM

Thanks for all the encouraging feedback. I'll stay off the dairy a little longer and try cutting out soy too. It's tricky--dairy and soy pop up in all kinds of unexpected things. It's really tough being in grad school and missing out on group lunches, happy hours, etc. Plus I'm so anxious to snap out of the fogginess so I can concentrate on finishing my thesis!

Thanks again for the support!


I was diagnosed this past fall as well and have been gluten free since Thanksgiving. I had a few days of incredible energy and clarity, but that faded and around the start of the year began to go down hill big time and it has pretty much been daily G & D ever since. The lesson for me has been that I need to go back to square one and proceed verrry carefully. I wasn't being careful enough on (what I assumed were) minor issues and am paying for it now. Fortunately the brain fog is mostly gone. I, too, am in grad school, and going gluten free enabled me to burst through on some deadlines. But if I am going to finish the degree I need to be very conservative regarding my diet.
I don't know if that helps... I thought you might appreciate knowing you are not the only one.
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