Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Two Celiac Parents
0

7 posts in this topic

My boyfriend and I are thinking about taking things to the next level, getting married, and starting a family. We both have Celiac disease, which up until now has made things easier for both of us because we're always looking out for all kinds of food that might have Gluten. Our kitchen is Gluten Free, and when we go out on dates we usually call the restaurants first to get an idea of how much they know about what ingredients are in their food.

My sister has been diagnosed with Celiac disease and his mother has been diagnosed as well. We know that Celiac disease is in both of our families and are concerned about our kid's chances of having a normal diet. We know it would be easier in some ways to keep the whole family gluten free, but if they did end up with Celiac Disease they would be lucky to have two parents who are knowledgeable when it comes to gluten free living. I know it's not 100% that our kids would be Celiac, but does anyone have a better idea of what the odds are on that?

What parent doesn't want their kids to be able to go to birthday parties and eat cake!!

If there are other posts on this topic I would appreciate if you could link me to them!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

I don't want your post to go unanswered. So this is more of a reply to bump you.

From my memory....

If your sibling has been diagnosed you have a 1 in 10 chance.

The average American has 1 in 133 statistic.

You have to remember this auto-immune disease has a "trigger". Thought to be an illness, severe stress, chilbirth, and maybe even an injury.

Your child can go to birthday parties and have gluten free cake!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm, I seem to remember 1 in 20 chance. But don't take my word for it. We don't have a known family history but both my boys have it! Go figure. It's so common, that chances are more and more people are going to be diagnosed (with at least a gluten intolerance). There are plenty of ways to work around social issues. Don't get all worked up about the future. When you have a child they very shortly change any preconceived notions you have! :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My boyfriend and I are thinking about taking things to the next level, getting married, and starting a family. We both have Celiac disease, which up until now has made things easier for both of us because we're always looking out for all kinds of food that might have Gluten. Our kitchen is Gluten Free, and when we go out on dates we usually call the restaurants first to get an idea of how much they know about what ingredients are in their food.

My sister has been diagnosed with Celiac disease and his mother has been diagnosed as well. We know that Celiac disease is in both of our families and are concerned about our kid's chances of having a normal diet. We know it would be easier in some ways to keep the whole family gluten free, but if they did end up with Celiac Disease they would be lucky to have two parents who are knowledgeable when it comes to gluten free living. I know it's not 100% that our kids would be Celiac, but does anyone have a better idea of what the odds are on that?

What parent doesn't want their kids to be able to go to birthday parties and eat cake!!

If there are other posts on this topic I would appreciate if you could link me to them!

I don't know the exact percentage answer to your question, but we were told that our daughter with the same genes as our other daughter diagnosed with celiac, has a 40% chance of developing the disease. My opinion, in case you care, is that why would you chance it by giving the child gluten; you're both gluten free anyway. It seems to me (this is not medical knowledge, just an assumption) that your child would have a very high chance of being at least gluten sensitive with both parents being diagnosed celiacs. The child would never be able to develop celiac if they were never given gluten.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first thought is that i wouldnt let this be a deciding factor of having kids. Celiac is becoming much more widely known... in another few years, i imagine it will be even more prominent in today's society. think of how well you and your boyfriend are doing. why couldn't you raise a family? your kids will be very healthy with or without allergies and intolerances because you are aware of ingredients and are more likely to have healthy food in your kitchen. have children and wait until about 6 mos to a year before you add gluten into the diet (if you should choose to) and then i would go ahead and have all your kids tested when they are around 2 or 3. this is what my husband (we've been married for one year now!!) and i have decided. i am gluten free and he isn't. if our kids are not celiac they will eat gluten free when i cook but will also have regular cereal and crackers and things. if this becomes too difficult and i frequently become contaminated we will look into other options.

best of luck to you and your boyfriend!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




I was told after my diagnoses that based on my family history, my children would have a 50% chance of developing the disease. But in my case, my paternal grandfather, a non compliant, was diagnosed around 30 years ago, my father, also non compliant, has gluten intolerance with DH, and I was diagnosed with adult acute onset celiac. Turns out that both of my girls have celiac. They were actually born with it active. And it really is okay, they don't mind. And my oldest,6, who just started school, enjoys tricking people into trying her foods, because they never realize what they are eating, like a birthday cake made out of rice! Another thought is, childhood obesity statistics are rising in this country. While a celiac child may still struggle with their weight, there will automatically be no fast food, no snack cakes. Your children are more likely to have a healthy, balanced diet from the start. And my husband's personal favorite, he is already stressing about the teenage years, alcohol is pretty much out. Good luck to both you. I hope you feel at ease with whatever you decide.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And my husband's personal favorite, he is already stressing about the teenage years, alcohol is pretty much out. Good luck to both you. I hope you feel at ease with whatever you decide.

Hate to break it to your husband, but even when I've been a strict adherent to the gluten free diet? I always found a type of alcohol I could drink. (I was the type of teen that was worlds better than some, but still made my parents' hair turn grey.)

If anything, because I couldn't have cheap beer or wheat vodka, I hit harder alcohols more readily. Of course, these days I barely drink even though I'm actually legal. Go figure.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,092
    • Total Posts
      920,315
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • i hope you tipped that waitress well????
    • WOW.  That looks eerily familiar.  Last December the temporary provider here at my local (rural) clinic gave me doxycycline to experiment with, but it was a mere ten milligrams.  Lol, no wonder it didn't help!  I'm glad you're feeling better.
    • I got cross contaminated some time ago & the rash came back pretty badly. I've attached a photo taken on June 11th of my back. It was also in my scalp, around my neck, on my front, shoulders, inner wrists and more.   Tonight I am not itching at all! I haven't itched all day long!!!! I can't take Dapsone because I'm allergic to sulfa drugs & Dapsone is a sulfa drug. Obviously that means I also can't take any of the other sulfa drugs that are used to treat dh after Dapsone is not an option. After those comes tetracycline. I really needed some relief! I began researching the dosage & particulars on tetracycline for dh. Extensive & exhaustive research did not pan out. The best I could find was treating Bullous phemphigoid. That said something like 500mg of tetracycline 4 times per day and about an equal amount of niacinimide. I really didn't want to take that much medication and in such strong doses. So my doctor (my PC doc) & I began experimenting. We tried Doxycycline 100mg twice a day. It seemed to be helping some but it just wasn't enough. Then we upped it to 200mg Doxycycline twice per day. It has taken about 5 days of that & I sit here not itching all day for the first time in a long, long time! This may not work for everyone. I did want to post it though as it is, at present, working for me. I am not thrilled at taking it but I have toughed this rash out before for years with no meds and I just couldn't do it again.
    • I laughed out loud at the 'little notebook' comment!😂 It has been interesting to see how much progress has actually been made over the past 10 years that there is even a notebook to be offered or a restaurant to eat in that will accommodate our 'allergy'. 10 years ago I feared that I would never eat in a restaurant again.  But the notebook comment is spot on.  Hopefully within the next 10 years restaurants will evolve enough to offer us a menu that clearly lists the delicious and extensive offerings that they have lovingly prepared just for us...and not just an ingredient list with nutritional values that take longer to read than War and Peace.   I am grateful that there are places to go that at least make the effort.  Who knows?  Eventually there may be restaurants which will have to offer menus with GLUTEN options available!
    • Thanks for posting this Adrien, it's a great list and I and others will appreciate the effort and the thought behind it. I loved my time in Malaysia and I'm glad I sampled all the food I could whilst I was still on an unrestricted diet. The good thing is that, like you say, some of the nice Malay foods are still ok. As a backpacker I survived on a lot of nasi goreng and laksa, nice to think if I return there I could still do the same Terima kasih!
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,123
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    ForeverYoung&GlutenFree
    Joined