Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Celiacs Get Paid $500 For A Plasma Donation


  • Please log in to reply

20 replies to this topic

#1 Edo

 
Edo

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 30 posts
 

Posted 13 February 2010 - 08:03 PM

I wanted to know if anyone has any input or experience with this. I just came across some info that if you have been diagnosed with an autoimmune disorder, including celiac, certain plasma donation centers will pay you a pretty hefty sum for donating your plasma. I believe it's because the antibodies in the plasma are valuable for medical use/studies/etc. moreso than normal plasma.

The place I found, called Access Clinical, says they pay up to $500 per donation, with a max of two donations per week, and cover all travel costs (even things like plane tickets and hotels!) if there isn't a nearby donation center. If this is true, wow. O_O

I do know that you have to be qualified in a number of ways and healthy enough to be able to donate in order to qualify, and I assume that some people will not receive the max of $500 due to various factors. And I think they only want the plasma if the antibodies are high enough (probably not high enough in celiacs who have been gluten-free for a long time).

If anyone has any experiences or insight on this topic, let's discuss.

And by the way, the reason I found out about this is because my household has been struggling terribly with financial issues and my boyfriend has resorted to donating his non-celiac plasma in order to make a little money. He makes somewhere between $40-$50 per donation, I think. And it's the highest paying "job" he has been able to get. Walmart fired him recently, and it was my having celiac disease that caused it. It was back when I was trying to start the diet, and was very sick and really overwhelmed with no one there to help me. I had a big emotional crisis the day I planned to start the diet, crying like a baby for most of it. He worked night shift and usually slept during part of the day, but stayed awake that day to support me, take me to stores as I don't drive, and help me buy the right things. That night, he was so exhausted that he dozed off for a few minutes at work. A manager happened to see it, and he was promptly fired. He's normally pretty much the best employee they have because he's amazingly efficient. But Walmart treats their employees pretty poorly; I have many more examples of that fact from both him and our roommate working there. But I feel terrible that he was fired and it was basically my fault. He needed that job BADLY. He has debt that is now piling up even more, and was about to go in for surgery for a really bad hernia he's had for years, which he now cannot have fixed because of course his Walmart health insurance was terminated along with his job. And the economy is so terrible, there are just no jobs out there. He hates that I have to feed him, give him gas money, and pay his share of rent and bills until he finds something. He faces rejection every day and keeps on trying, despite how disheartening it is.

So I figure, if I can contribute both to our current situation, as well as help some other people out there by donating my fancy celiac plasma, I would be proud to do it! What do you all think?
  • 0
Gluten-free since Jan 7, 2010
Also started off free of dairy, soy, yeast, eggs, nightshades, peanuts, tree nuts, fish, and shellfish.
Currently free of dairy, soy, yeast, eggs, and refined carbs/sugars.
I have trouble digesting carbs and fats.

Positive Enterolab results Jan 25, 2010
DQ8 and DQ6 genes

Cheetos... =F

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 ravenwoodglass

 
ravenwoodglass

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,767 posts
 

Posted 14 February 2010 - 05:15 AM

This could be very helpful for many. Thanks for posting. I checked it out but unfortunately I don't weigh enough to donate. :(
  • 0
Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#3 Reba32

 
Reba32

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 585 posts
 

Posted 14 February 2010 - 06:42 AM

I've never heard of it before, but I filled in their contact thing to find out if there are any facilities near me.
  • 0

#4 mommida

 
mommida

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,945 posts
 

Posted 14 February 2010 - 09:01 AM

I have always wondered about Celiac blood antibodies helping heal others.
I'm going to call because I've had many of the listed viral illnesses. Chicken Pox, Mono/Epstein Bar, CMV, and I have also had meningitis. :blink: Maybe I've had too many things, for them to use my plasma. I've never had the "official gold standard diagnoses of Cleiac".

Thanks for the link! Wouldn't it be nice to pay the mortgage in blood. :P
  • 0
Michigan

#5 tarnalberry

 
tarnalberry

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,542 posts
 

Posted 14 February 2010 - 09:10 AM

It looks like the want to plasma as positive controls for laboratory tests. But if you're on a gluten free diet, you won't have any antibodies - your blood/plasma won't look any different from someone who doesn't have it. So why celiac? That seems potentially very misleading...?
  • 0
Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy
G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004
Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me
Bellevue, WA

#6 AKcollegestudent

 
AKcollegestudent

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 151 posts
 

Posted 14 February 2010 - 11:21 AM

I'm a starving college student, so I figured that I might as well submit my form. (Doubt I'll get approved, but hey, what can it hurt? And if this does work, I might even have enough money to buy the bicycle I really, really want. The one that I wasn't able to buy last year because joint pain + mountain biking don't mix.)
  • 0

#7 Edo

 
Edo

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 30 posts
 

Posted 14 February 2010 - 11:32 AM

It looks like the want to plasma as positive controls for laboratory tests. But if you're on a gluten free diet, you won't have any antibodies - your blood/plasma won't look any different from someone who doesn't have it. So why celiac? That seems potentially very misleading...?

Yeah, that's exactly what I was wondering about. :huh: I was under the impression that antibodies weren't present in the blood anymore once gluten-free. And as we know, sometimes not even detected in the celiac blood panel tests we get at the doctor (so many false negatives). I only know that Enterolab says antibodies stay in the digestive tract for over a year after going gluten-free, but that shows up in stool, not blood.

So yeah, I don't know why they are asking for celiacs if this is the case, since anyone who knows they are celiac is almost certainly gluten-free. And I doubt going back on gluten to donate plasma would be worth it to any celiac. I sure wouldn't do it.

I haven't contacted Access Clinical yet, but for anyone who has done so and has stated that they're a gluten-free celiac, let us know what Access Clinical says. Hopefully we can figure out if it is truly possible for celiacs to donate and be compensated this much. I know it would help a lot of us who are struggling in this awful economy.
  • 0
Gluten-free since Jan 7, 2010
Also started off free of dairy, soy, yeast, eggs, nightshades, peanuts, tree nuts, fish, and shellfish.
Currently free of dairy, soy, yeast, eggs, and refined carbs/sugars.
I have trouble digesting carbs and fats.

Positive Enterolab results Jan 25, 2010
DQ8 and DQ6 genes

Cheetos... =F

#8 Reba32

 
Reba32

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 585 posts
 

Posted 15 February 2010 - 05:13 PM

I wonder if it's something else in the blood from people who are prone to auto-immune diseases, and they've just categorized them? I have quite a collection of them myself. Or genetic testing or something.
  • 0

#9 luvs2eat

 
luvs2eat

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,112 posts
 

Posted 15 February 2010 - 05:31 PM

I signed up and received an email today asking for my latest bloodwork showing antibodies. The last time I had them done (actually only the second time... first time, before going gluten free, they were off the charts), they were completely w/in normal limits... cause I was gluten free!!

I'll email them back and tell them that... but I don't expect to hear much from them again. Weird.
  • 0
luvs2eat
Living in the beautiful Ozark mountains in Arkansas
positive blood tests and later, positive biopsy
diagnosed 8/5/02, gluten-free (after lots of mistakes!) since that day
Dairy free since July 2010 and NOT happy about it!!

#10 twe0708

 
twe0708

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 429 posts
 

Posted 16 February 2010 - 06:21 AM

Maybe I don't understand the procedure, but why can't they just take your blood and then separate the red blood cells from the plasma? Why do they need to give you back the red blood cells?
  • 0

#11 luvs2eat

 
luvs2eat

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,112 posts
 

Posted 16 February 2010 - 09:04 AM

Here is the response I received when I emailed explaining that my last blood work showed normal levels of antibodies because I was keeping a gluten free diet:

"Thank you for the information you have provided below. Given this information, unfortunately you would not be a suitable candidate for our programs. I am happy to hear that staying gluten free but the donors in our programs are also on a gluten free diet, but they still have very high levels for Celiac. Not everyone qualifies for our programs because everybody has a different immune system.



We do thank you for your interest in the programs and wish you the best."
  • 0
luvs2eat
Living in the beautiful Ozark mountains in Arkansas
positive blood tests and later, positive biopsy
diagnosed 8/5/02, gluten-free (after lots of mistakes!) since that day
Dairy free since July 2010 and NOT happy about it!!

#12 tarnalberry

 
tarnalberry

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,542 posts
 

Posted 16 February 2010 - 09:14 AM

"Thank you for the information you have provided below. Given this information, unfortunately you would not be a suitable candidate for our programs. I am happy to hear that staying gluten free but the donors in our programs are also on a gluten free diet, but they still have very high levels for Celiac. Not everyone qualifies for our programs because everybody has a different immune system."


Clearly, there is some ... misleading or misinforming going on here. If the donors are on a gluten free diet, they're not going to have high levels (unless they've got refractory sprue).
  • 0
Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy
G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004
Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me
Bellevue, WA

#13 luvs2eat

 
luvs2eat

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,112 posts
 

Posted 16 February 2010 - 11:18 AM

Clearly, there is some ... misleading or misinforming going on here. If the donors are on a gluten free diet, they're not going to have high levels (unless they've got refractory sprue).


And the POSSIBILITY of being accepted and MAYBE earning up to $500 is not NEARLY enough to make me eat gluten so my antibody numbers are up!
  • 0
luvs2eat
Living in the beautiful Ozark mountains in Arkansas
positive blood tests and later, positive biopsy
diagnosed 8/5/02, gluten-free (after lots of mistakes!) since that day
Dairy free since July 2010 and NOT happy about it!!

#14 Edo

 
Edo

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 30 posts
 

Posted 16 February 2010 - 02:47 PM

Well unfortunately this is looking less doable every day. I had gotten my hopes up a little because my boyfriend mentioned hearing something about labs having the ability to stimulate antibodies after the fact (as in, as long as the plasma comes from a person with the autoimmune disease, even if no antibodies are there at the time, they can add some kind of gluten-substitute to the donated plasma to trigger the antibodies into appearing). Unfortunately, Access Clinical says they can't do this. I wonder where my boyfriend even heard it, lol.

Anyway, I sent them an email with some questions, and got a response today. Here is my original email to Access Clinical:

Hi,

I am looking into donating my plasma and I have several questions.

I am female, born 2/25/1986, 5'3" and 118 pounds, live in zip code 92081, and have the autoimmune disorder celiac disease. I am not on any medications except over-the-counter dietary supplements. As of 1/25/10, I have been diagnosed by Dr. Kenneth Fine, M.D. of Enterolab (an independent lab who uses stool testing) as having elevated levels of intestinal antigliadin IgA antibody and anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA antibody. The results are consistent with what is seen in celiac patients, but stool testing can only diagnose as far as gluten-sensitivity, not celiac. I have also had genetic testing by the same lab indicating that I have DQ8 and DQ6 genes, which are associated with celiac and gluten-sensitivity. I have also been on a completely gluten-free diet since 1/7/10 and have seen drastic improvement in my celiac symptoms. Is this enough to consider me diagnosed, or do I need my primary care physician to officially diagnose me as celiac in order to be qualified for plasma donation?

I would also like an explanation as to whether or not a gluten-free celiac's plasma is still usable, since there are no antibodies produced in the blood unless the patient is consuming gluten. Since I am gluten-free, will I still be able to donate my plasma? I have heard that perhaps once you take out the plasma, you can add something to the plasma to stimulate the antibodies to appear. And in that case, as long as I am really celiac and would produce antibodies if gluten was consumed, you would be able to stimulate the antibodies yourself and it would not matter to the donation process whether or not I was gluten-free. Is this true, or would I need to be consuming gluten so I would have the antibodies already in my plasma at the time of donation? Any explanation would be greatly appreciated. Many of my celiac friends are eager to donate and would like to know if they can, since they are gluten-free and plan to stay that way.

Also, if I was found to be eligible, and based on my above stats, what compensation would I receive? And could you let me know what location I would need to go to donate, etc? I am in Vista, CA 92081. Any other information I would need to know would be appreciated. A new donor packet sent to this email would be great. Thank you.


Here is Access Clinical's response:

Thank you for visiting our website and your inquiry below about becoming a donor in our programs. Now how did you actually hear about us? We are always looking for new donors for our programs and we like to know where people see or hear about us.

In response to your questions below;

We are always looking for more donors for our programs who have an actual diagnosis, and from what I read below you do have, although it was thru a stool culture/evaluation, none the less you have been told based on that, that you indeed have Celiac from what you have indicated. However for our programs you would need the actual blood tests/results showing the antibodies. The reason we require the blood testing is because our programs are blood/plasma based, you can have a positive stool culture but the blood can be negative and vice versa . Although you indicated you had/have the antibodies present on the test that was performed at the other lab, this does not necessarily mean that you have the blood antibodies as well.

The donors in our programs are also on strict Gluten Fee diets, but their immune system still maintains very high antibody levels even though they are not consuming any gluten products. So before we can even screen you we would need to see where your antibodies are on the actual blood tests. We look at the Gliadin antibodies as well as the Tissue Transglutaminase antibodies. Because our plasma is being used to create controls for test kits, those tests would have to be positive and at certain levels (they all don’t have to be positive) in order for the plasma to work for the end users. So you would need to have that testing done for us to really determine your suitability for the program.

As for if the plasma being suitable if the person is “Gluten Free” and has no antibodies, the answer to that would be no. The reason for that is you need to start with a positive control, if someone is donating (and they would not be if that were the case) with no antibodies the plasma cannot be used to make the controls, they would have to have the antibodies present and at a certain titer. Now I am not sure where you heard that once the plasma is taken out that something can be added to the plasma to make antibodies for Celiac, if there were no antibodies to begin with you can’t synthetically make them and put into negative plasma, if that were the case we would not need to recruit patients and compensate them this much, we could send patients who are overall healthy and pay them the going rate of $35.00 per donation instead of the compensation of someone who has the antibodies and qualifies. I hope that helps answer that question for you..

Now, if you do have the blood test (or get one), we would review it to determine your suitability for the program. At that time we go over a brief medical questionnaire with you over the phone to qualify you for the center and then we can schedule you to donate. I see you are located in Vista, CA, we do have a facility that can do this program for you, however it is not in North County, it is in San Diego. Compensation ranges for this program from $200 a donation to as much as $500 per donation depending on your actual blood antibody test. We go over your specific compensation once we have the results.


I hope I have answered all of your questions/concerns, etc. If you would like to discuss this more, or think of something else, you can either email me back or you may call my office at 760-931-8444 (We are in San Marcos). I am usually available to take calls from 730am to 4pm pacific time.

I look forward to speaking to you and hopefully we can qualify you for the program.

Take care and talk to you soon.

Robert


So I'm thinking, like Tarnalberry said, the only celiacs who can actually do this are those with refractory sprue. All their celiac donors must be in that boat, if they are truly gluten-free. There is no way I'll expect any blood test I take now to show antibodies. And I really doubt it would be worth it for us non-refractory celiacs to go back on gluten just for this, especially not for any extended time. I wouldn't compromise my health for any amount of money, no matter how desperate I was. My health is the most valuable thing I've got.

Oh well. Usually I never get my hopes up about "easy money" but it would have been cool if it was true. The money would've helped a lot. It's something for refractory celiacs to look into though, if their antibodies aren't being suppressed with meds. But it would be bad for anyone to compromise their health for the money.

Sorry to get all your hopes up. ._.
  • 0
Gluten-free since Jan 7, 2010
Also started off free of dairy, soy, yeast, eggs, nightshades, peanuts, tree nuts, fish, and shellfish.
Currently free of dairy, soy, yeast, eggs, and refined carbs/sugars.
I have trouble digesting carbs and fats.

Positive Enterolab results Jan 25, 2010
DQ8 and DQ6 genes

Cheetos... =F

#15 ravenwoodglass

 
ravenwoodglass

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,767 posts
 

Posted 16 February 2010 - 03:01 PM

It sounds like the most suitable subjects are going to be folks who were just diagnosed and haven't had any time to heal yet. Those who are newly diagnosed might still be able to do this.
I wonder what this lab is trying to accomplish? A drug to stop the antibodies perhaps?
  • 0
Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: