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Endomysial Ab Iga Screen
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8 posts in this topic

After having symptoms, my family physician ordered a test for celiac disease with results as follows. I'm not sure this is the best test but I am waiting for a consult with a gastroenterologist on Feb. 25. My daughter has a thyroid problem (hypo) and is also sensitive/intolerant of gluten although she's not willing to undergo a gluten challenge to find out (can't say I blame her after she's been gluten-free for quite some time).

My test results (test was performed by Quest Diagnostics):

Endomysial AB (IgA) Screen - POSITIVE

Additional testing has been added:

Endomysial AB Titer 1:320 <1:5

Can someone interpret this for me? TIA

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Endomysial antibody is the same as tissue transglutaminase antibody. The lab tested for the presence and found that it was there. This is usually indicated by a color change in a specimen well or on a strip (the same principle behind a pregancy test). They then confirmed it by checking the titer, which was 1:320. In other words, your serum could be diluted by a volume of water 320 times greater than serum, and the test could still detect the antibody. The final result is not considered positive on testing of undiluted serum alone. It must remain positive to dilution with 1.5 times as much water. That's what ">1.5" means. Since your test remained positive through dilution to 320 times the original volume, you have the antibody. The final step to confirm diagnosis is biopsy, but the positive result means you likely have celiac disease.

Did your doctor not explain this to you?

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Thanks so much for the explanation! I googled it and never could find info that explained what the 1:320 meant. All I knew that it was positive. I didn't know if this was a "good" test as I know there are several other tests available, too.

It was not explained by my Dr. (a family physician) other than the fact that it was positive. He asked if I wanted to go gluten free at which time I requested a referral to a gastroenterologist. I've been waiting for that appt. for about six weeks and am continuing to consume gluten. Hopefully the weather will cooperate as they're predicting nasty weather this week and I am so anxious to keep this appointment and take it from there.

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Thanks so much for the explanation! I googled it and never could find info that explained what the 1:320 meant. All I knew that it was positive. I didn't know if this was a "good" test as I know there are several other tests available, too.

It was not explained by my Dr. (a family physician) other than the fact that it was positive. He asked if I wanted to go gluten free at which time I requested a referral to a gastroenterologist. I've been waiting for that appt. for about six weeks and am continuing to consume gluten. Hopefully the weather will cooperate as they're predicting nasty weather this week and I am so anxious to keep this appointment and take it from there.

A positive EMA test, regardless of titer number, is a positive for Celiac Disease. It's 100% specific to Celiac, meaning no other condition will cause a positive. You have celiac disease and I am impressed that a family physician would suggest starting the diet immediately. Smart man. At this point, an endo will check for amount of damage but it's not needed for a diagnosis.

Good luck to you and hope you feel better soon!

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Thanks, Gemini! I have gained so much from reading this forum for a few weeks while waiting my appt. with the gastro on Thurs. this week.

I think I have a slight edge as my doctor's daughter has celiac disease so he's far more familiar with it on a personal level than the average physician. :D

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I had an appointment with my gastroenterologist yesterday and was so pleased. He's just the nicest doctor! I didn't realize that my family physician had ordered the comprehensive panel and picked up a copy of it. Since I am still consuming gluten, I now need to schedule the endoscopy/biopsy. He feels sure I have celiac. I asked a zillion questions and he asked if I'm a nurse. NOT! I told him I read a lot. :lol: ..thanks to the good info I've gotten from this forum as well as having read Dr. Peter Green's book.

Has anyone read the updated version of Dr. Green's book that was released in late January? I've thought of ordering it and sending my older book to my daughter, who definitely has problem with gluten as well as having a thyroid problem...

------------------------------

Celiac Disease Comprehensive Panel

Tissue Transglutaminase IGA - (Reference Range <5 U/ML)

tTG Iga Ab >100

Reference Range:

<5 U/ML Negative

5-8 U/ML Equivocal

>8 U/ML Positive

IGA 235 - (Reference Range 81-463 MG/DL)

Add testing for TTG IGG (Not indicated)

Endomysial AB (IgA) Screen - POSITIVE

Additional testing has been added:

Endomysial AB Titer 1:320 - (Reference Range <1:5)

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Is <1:5 positive or is it >1:5 for the endomysial test?

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Is <1:5 positive or is it >1:5 for the endomysial test?

This thread is 3 years old.

Different labs have different ranges. You need to look at your blood test results based on the range of the lab that tests it. A simple explanation to think of is - one measures in centimeters and the other in inches.

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