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Question About The Mental And Emotional Side


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9 replies to this topic

#1 whyme

 
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Posted 22 February 2010 - 12:15 PM

I am new to the site. I am 37 and battled "food poisoning" symptoms for a year and a half. I would be up all night in sever cramping, nausea, headache, etc. I went to three doctors. Two of them told me I had acid reflux. I went on two diferent medicines and nothing helped. After a week of eating granola bars only because I had ZERO appetite, going thru shakes and other listed side effects, I truly thought I was losing my mind. I met with a new doctor, an internal doc. I told her everything and she immediately said, "go Gluten free". So I did and man what a life changing result. However, I would cheat and it would kick me in the butt. Anyway on to my question, why does this bring on such bad depression, anxiety, such emotional stress. I cry and i feel like I should be on pression/anxiety medicine. it is so hard for me to describe how I feel. Not just my stomach, diahrrea, TIRED, headaches, but the emotional stuff is a killer. After my body settles down, I am mentally fine. Any help with this? I really don't want to go on medicine for depression/anxiety, it seems like it flares up with gluten attacks. I am OBVIOUSLY done cheating!! The last 24 hrs have been terrible!!!
Thanks,Lisa
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#2 kareng

 
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Posted 22 February 2010 - 12:35 PM

I have been gluten-free for almost 2 weeks. I'm still a bit emotional because it is a big life change, could effect my kids, could result in other illness, etc. I keep getting headaches but good high cacao chocolate helps a little. It supposedly works on endorphins in the brain (so does exercise). Try to find something happy. I bought red spoons, spatulas,toaster, etc. That was fun. You'll get thru. Good luck.
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#3 ciavyn

 
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Posted 22 February 2010 - 12:42 PM

Hello! And welcome to your (our) new world! It does get easier - I promise.

Re: depression and mental issues. I'm diagnosed ADD, minor OCD, depression, PTSD and have issues with anxiety. I have never been medicated, by choice. Here's what I've learned.

Depression feeds on our belief that nothing will ever get better. We are useless, helpless, no one really cares about us, etc. Anyone with depression knows the little chorus that feeds your brain when you are sinking into depression. But here's what the rest of you -- the non-depressed part -- knows after your first bout of it: this too shall pass. And that is what you have to focus on. The only reason I managed to go without meds is because I clued in that 1. I have control over how I behave and react to things. I do NOT control my emotions. 2. Tomorrow is another day, and I know from experience that things will improve. Maybe not this moment, maybe not tomorrow, but they will soon. 3. It is okay to take a mental health break. For some reason we often feel like we should be able to shake everything off and go back to being "normal." You've got to give yourself permission to take a mental health break, relax, pull yourself together, and then get back out there. I'm not saying take a week, but allow yourself a couple of hours doing something you enjoy that doesn't demand too much of you. Then the next day, pull yourself back up and get out there. And for the grand finale, 4. Everyone has issues. You aren't alone and you aren't "special" because this is your issue. We've all got them, and you are entitled to work through yours the best way you can. So don't be so hard on yourself! Give yourself time and space to work through this, and request the same of those around you. If you don't take care of you and respect YOU, why should those around you?

Hang in there -- this does get easier. I promise.
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Gluten free: Nov. 2009
Peanut and dairy free: Dec. 2009
Rediscovered dairy: March 2010 (in small quantities)
Peanuts added back: June 2010 (in small quantities)

#4 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 22 February 2010 - 12:48 PM

However, I would cheat and it would kick me in the butt. Anyway on to my question, why does this bring on such bad depression, anxiety, such emotional stress. I cry and i feel like I should be on pression/anxiety medicine. it is so hard for me to describe how I feel. Not just my stomach, diahrrea, TIRED, headaches, but the emotional stuff is a killer. After my body settles down, I am mentally fine.


Hello and welcome. The reason why gluten is having the 'mental' effects that it is having with you when you get glutened is because for you the antibodies are "attacking" the brain. Your not alone in this effect. For me it helps that I know it is gluten induced and that the emotional stuff will pass. As long as I don't keep reglutening myself.
Gluten can really do a lot of damage to the nervous system and the brain so hopefully you'll be able to find ways to avoid 'cheating' soon.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#5 whyme

 
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Posted 22 February 2010 - 01:13 PM

I have been gluten-free for almost 2 weeks. I'm still a bit emotional because it is a big life change, could effect my kids, could result in other illness, etc. I keep getting headaches but good high cacao chocolate helps a little. It supposedly works on endorphins in the brain (so does exercise). Try to find something happy. I bought red spoons, spatulas,toaster, etc. That was fun. You'll get thru. Good luck.

Exercise has always been a big part of my life, however, I herniated a lower disc in my back last year and have been recovering from that. It has been a bad 2009 and hoping 2010 is nuch better!! :) thanks for the reply.
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#6 whyme

 
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Posted 22 February 2010 - 01:17 PM

Hello! And welcome to your (our) new world! It does get easier - I promise.

Re: depression and mental issues. I'm diagnosed ADD, minor OCD, depression, PTSD and have issues with anxiety. I have never been medicated, by choice. Here's what I've learned.

Depression feeds on our belief that nothing will ever get better. We are useless, helpless, no one really cares about us, etc. Anyone with depression knows the little chorus that feeds your brain when you are sinking into depression. But here's what the rest of you -- the non-depressed part -- knows after your first bout of it: this too shall pass. And that is what you have to focus on. The only reason I managed to go without meds is because I clued in that 1. I have control over how I behave and react to things. I do NOT control my emotions. 2. Tomorrow is another day, and I know from experience that things will improve. Maybe not this moment, maybe not tomorrow, but they will soon. 3. It is okay to take a mental health break. For some reason we often feel like we should be able to shake everything off and go back to being "normal." You've got to give yourself permission to take a mental health break, relax, pull yourself together, and then get back out there. I'm not saying take a week, but allow yourself a couple of hours doing something you enjoy that doesn't demand too much of you. Then the next day, pull yourself back up and get out there. And for the grand finale, 4. Everyone has issues. You aren't alone and you aren't "special" because this is your issue. We've all got them, and you are entitled to work through yours the best way you can. So don't be so hard on yourself! Give yourself time and space to work through this, and request the same of those around you. If you don't take care of you and respect YOU, why should those around you?

Hang in there -- this does get easier. I promise.


I do tell myself that eryone has problems and this one is all mine. I do a good job throwing a pitty party for myself. usually alone in my bedroom bawling my head off with no one around. I do need to remember that is shall pass. I really need to do a better job and just cutting out Gluten. It is hard to believe that I have ate bread and pasta all my life and then this flares up out of no where. But since going gluten-free I have felt much better. Thank you for your response. Lisa
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#7 whyme

 
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Posted 22 February 2010 - 01:18 PM

Hello and welcome. The reason why gluten is having the 'mental' effects that it is having with you when you get glutened is because for you the antibodies are "attacking" the brain. Your not alone in this effect. For me it helps that I know it is gluten induced and that the emotional stuff will pass. As long as I don't keep reglutening myself.
Gluten can really do a lot of damage to the nervous system and the brain so hopefully you'll be able to find ways to avoid 'cheating' soon.

That is very helpful to know this. I really was htinking maybe I need medicine, which i HATE to take. I have battled the idea for months. Now I feel like I don;t have to battle that one anymore. There really is a reason and I CAN control it. Thank you so much!!
Lisa
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#8 sandsurfgirl

 
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Posted 22 February 2010 - 03:06 PM

AS hard as it is, you must stop cheating on the diet and be extra clean with your kitchen, beauty products, etc. It's not worth it. No food is worth suffering and you can make anything gluten free at home anyway.

In addition to the antibodies attacking the brain, there is also a connection between the brain and intestines where inflammation in the intestines directly affects the parts of the brain that control anxiety, depression, etc. I don't know all the scientific terms for it, but the GI doc that misdiagnosed with IBS did have a lot of knowledge about the brain/intestines connection.

Anxiety attacks and depression were the first thing to go away within days of being gluten free.
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Lots of doctors diagnosed me with lots of things including IBS, lactose intolerance, wheat intolerance, and quite a few of them threw up their hands in total confusion.

Had GI symptoms, allergy symptoms and unexplained illness my whole life.

Jan. 2010 Diagnosed celiac at the age of 40.
Ready to get well and get on with my life!

#9 whyme

 
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Posted 22 February 2010 - 03:44 PM

AS hard as it is, you must stop cheating on the diet and be extra clean with your kitchen, beauty products, etc. It's not worth it. No food is worth suffering and you can make anything gluten free at home anyway.

In addition to the antibodies attacking the brain, there is also a connection between the brain and intestines where inflammation in the intestines directly affects the parts of the brain that control anxiety, depression, etc. I don't know all the scientific terms for it, but the GI doc that misdiagnosed with IBS did have a lot of knowledge about the brain/intestines connection.

Anxiety attacks and depression were the first thing to go away within days of being gluten free.

That is very interesting to me. I had no idea there was such a connection between the intestines and brain. I am definitely committed now. This was an eye opener and reminder of how bad this can be. I was ALOT worse last summer and this incident was a quick reminder of that time. Thank you fro responding. And you are right, when I start feeling better, the anxiety and depression is the first to go. It is the first to come on and first to leave. Thank you!!
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#10 jerseyangel

 
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Posted 22 February 2010 - 05:19 PM

I had no idea there was such a connection between the intestines and brain.

The majority of serotonin is in the intestine. My GI describes the intestine as a "second brain".
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Patti


"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev




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