Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

How Do I Read Blood Test?


  • Please log in to reply

2 replies to this topic

#1 Dixie1

 
Dixie1

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
 

Posted 26 February 2010 - 10:56 AM

Hello all,

So glad to have found this forum. My husband recently had bloodwork done after requesting from his primary doctor as he wants to diagnose or rule out Celiac. Here's the result:

EMA (IGA) negative
EMA Titer not performed due to TNP-Screening test Negative
TSH, 3rd Generation w/ reflex to FT4 2.14
Gliadin Antibody (IGA) 37 H
CBC were all in range

His doctor told him the result was a false positive but I don't know what this means. He referred him to a gastro for a endoscope. Can anyone interpret the results for me?

Thanks!
  • 0

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 mushroom

 
mushroom

    Mushroom

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,448 posts
 

Posted 26 February 2010 - 11:47 AM

Hello all,

So glad to have found this forum. My husband recently had bloodwork done after requesting from his primary doctor as he wants to diagnose or rule out Celiac. Here's the result:

EMA (IGA) negative
EMA Titer not performed due to TNP-Screening test Negative
TSH, 3rd Generation w/ reflex to FT4 2.14
Gliadin Antibody (IGA) 37 H
CBC were all in range

His doctor told him the result was a false positive but I don't know what this means. He referred him to a gastro for a endoscope. Can anyone interpret the results for me?

Thanks!

Hi, and welcome.

While I am not an expert on blood testing, your husband's doctor did not perform the full panel, which consists of:

Anti-Gliadin (AGA) IgA
Anti-Gliadin (AGA) IgG
Anti-Endomysial (EMA) IgA
Anti-Tissue Transglutaminase (tTG) IgA
Total Serum IgA

The total serum IgA is performed as a check because if that is low it can invalidate all the other results. His doctor performed the first and third test, but not the other three. The TSH is a thyroid test and of course CBC is a complete blood count. The gliadin IGA was positive.

In our book there is no such thing as a "false positive". There are often false negatives, but not positives. A positive is a positive. At least he referred him to a GI specialist for an endoscopy and biopsy. This doctor may or may not want to perform the full panel. Unfortunately, celiac testing is not as accurate as we would like it to be, either in blood work or in the 'scope, which relies on the skill of the doctor in recognizing which areas to biopsy because the damage in the small intestine can be patchy and it is such a large area. Make sure that he takes at least 5 or 6 samples from different areas to increase the chances of finding damage to the villi. Sometimes suspicious areas can be seen just through the scope but most often it takes a microscope to identify them. So, with that in mind, it is sometimes possible, unfortunately, to also have a false negative on the endoscopy. This would be discouraging for your husband, but there is another diagnostic tool available to him--a positive response to the diet.

Regardless of the results of his testing, he should give a gluten free diet a good two-month trial and see how he responds. He can start this as soon as he has had the endoscopy. This is because doctors are now starting to realize that there is such a thing as non-celiac gluten intolerance, which can give you the same symptoms and problems as celiac disease but does not show up on any testing.

Keep in touch and let us know the results of his endoscopy, and feel free to ask any additional questions you may have.
  • 0
Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#3 nora_n

 
nora_n

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,490 posts
 

Posted 28 February 2010 - 03:10 AM

Yes, teh antigliadin test is the old one, and whenever a new test comes they tell the doctors the old one was faulty and the new one is so much better.....

The antigliadin test is typically the first test to turn positive in early celiac. That is why they call it false positive. Because the ttg test has not turned positive yet.

Of course lots of celaics will have only one test positive, or even none. Even i total villous atrophy, 20% of people have totally negative blood tests.
  • 0
gluten-free since may 06 after neg. biopsy symptoms went away and DH symptoms which I had since 03 got gradually better.
daughter officially diagnosed celiac and casein intolerant.
non-DQ2 or DQ8. Maybe DQ1? Updated: Yes, double DQ5
Hypothyroid since 2000, thyroxine first started to work well 06 on a low-carb and gluten-free diet
Lost 20 kg after going gluten-free and weighing 53 kg now. neg. biopsy for DH. Found out afterwards from this forum that it should have been taken during an outbreak but it was taken two weeks after. vitaminD was 57 nmol/l in may08)




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: