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Gluten Free In Seattle
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any suggestions for good gluten free eats in seattle? (especially in fremont and ballard)

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Yelp has a gluten free section that can help you find places - but check the reviews to see what people have actually said about them, of course. :)

Flying Apron bakery is in Fremont.

Chaco Canyon Cafe is in the U District, not too far away.

Cafe Flora is just south of the arboretum, and pricey, but I hear it's quite good.

Pizza Pi in the U District also have gluten-free (and CF) pizza.

Whole Foods, of course, has lots of gluten free options, even in their food bars, if you're ok with those.

Yelp and Google will find you a bunch more. It's not too hard to find places in the area that can meet your needs around here. (I'm on the eastside, and tend to favor Thai Ginger or a local, small sushi place.)

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I'm heading to Seattle proper in a couple weeks. Know anything good there? I don't always trust yelp because I'm super sensitive, and have had glutenings after ordering off of gluten-free menus even after talking extensively with what seemed like very knowledgeable managers. ...and I don't have other foods that do that to me. So, no food bars, etc for me! =)

If anyone has any trusted restaurants in that neighborhood, I'd love to hear about them!

Yelp has a gluten free section that can help you find places - but check the reviews to see what people have actually said about them, of course. :)

Flying Apron bakery is in Fremont.

Chaco Canyon Cafe is in the U District, not too far away.

Cafe Flora is just south of the arboretum, and pricey, but I hear it's quite good.

Pizza Pi in the U District also have gluten-free (and CF) pizza.

Whole Foods, of course, has lots of gluten free options, even in their food bars, if you're ok with those.

Yelp and Google will find you a bunch more. It's not too hard to find places in the area that can meet your needs around here. (I'm on the eastside, and tend to favor Thai Ginger or a local, small sushi place.)

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I'm heading to Seattle proper in a couple weeks. Know anything good there? I don't always trust yelp because I'm super sensitive, and have had glutenings after ordering off of gluten-free menus even after talking extensively with what seemed like very knowledgeable managers. ...and I don't have other foods that do that to me. So, no food bars, etc for me! =)

If anyone has any trusted restaurants in that neighborhood, I'd love to hear about them!

The ones I listed are ones I particularly trust.

Flying Apron is entirely gluten free (aside from a few items they make with gluten free oats which are plainly labeled).

Chaco Canyon is a primarily vegan/raw food place, so while they have bread on the premises, they are all quite knowledgeable about the basic ingredients making up all of their foods. (And it's plainly listed on the menu.)

Cafe Flora is a fancy, limited menu, restaurant that is also well known for the chef being very aware of gluten issues (and other food allergy issues).

Ditto for Pizza Pi, though again it is a shared facility, they're focus is on vegan offerings, and they stay quite aware of what's in their food.

(The "funky food" places tend to be more aware because there are ingredients that they want to avoid for various reasons.)

There are a couple other places mostly dedicated to gluten free - DaVinci's changed it's name (Wheatless In Seattle?), I think, and there's a bakery down in Kent and one in Maple Valley (but there's no need for the half hour drive if you're in Seattle proper). Google will help direct you to those places that specialize in gluten free as well.

Edit: I realize there might be some confusion as you said "Seattle proper". All the places I listed ARE in Seattle - those are the neighborhoods of Seattle. If you mean downtown Seattle, then you're in a spot where Yelp reviews are what you'll have to rely on. There isn't as wide a range of options downtown as in other places, but there are a few. (There's a Thai fusion place under the convention center... can't think of the name of it at the moment.)

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Thanks. By Seattle proper I did mean the city downtown, but since I don't know how the neighborhoods work, I didn't realize all of those were Seattle. I will have a car, so I don't mind driving a bit. =) These places look great. I'll definitely try the Flying Apron and probably Cafe Flora. I saw mixed reviews about Wheatless in Seattle, but I may check it out because I can. After spending some time on google and yelp, there seem to be quite a lot of options. I generally don't trust chains like Outback, because you never know from day to day or city to city who will be working there!

The ones I listed are ones I particularly trust.

Flying Apron is entirely gluten free (aside from a few items they make with gluten free oats which are plainly labeled).

Chaco Canyon is a primarily vegan/raw food place, so while they have bread on the premises, they are all quite knowledgeable about the basic ingredients making up all of their foods. (And it's plainly listed on the menu.)

Cafe Flora is a fancy, limited menu, restaurant that is also well known for the chef being very aware of gluten issues (and other food allergy issues).

Ditto for Pizza Pi, though again it is a shared facility, they're focus is on vegan offerings, and they stay quite aware of what's in their food.

(The "funky food" places tend to be more aware because there are ingredients that they want to avoid for various reasons.)

There are a couple other places mostly dedicated to gluten free - DaVinci's changed it's name (Wheatless In Seattle?), I think, and there's a bakery down in Kent and one in Maple Valley (but there's no need for the half hour drive if you're in Seattle proper). Google will help direct you to those places that specialize in gluten free as well.

Edit: I realize there might be some confusion as you said "Seattle proper". All the places I listed ARE in Seattle - those are the neighborhoods of Seattle. If you mean downtown Seattle, then you're in a spot where Yelp reviews are what you'll have to rely on. There isn't as wide a range of options downtown as in other places, but there are a few. (There's a Thai fusion place under the convention center... can't think of the name of it at the moment.)

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