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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Chicken And Gluten Intolerance
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31 posts in this topic

Hello All,

I have a question if Chickens eat grains, then wouldn't that grain affect eggs and their meat, wouldn't what they

consume go through them? Wouldn't the gluten go through to their eggs and be in their meat?

Peace 4 1

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No. Gluten gets digested and eliminated by them.

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No. Gluten gets digested and eliminated by them.

Hello

I found our answer and I thought there was a problem with chicken and eggs.

I found also this quote in a gluten and dairy free brochure for people with autism spectrum disorders,

"Avoid grain-fed and milk-fed meat/ chicken/eggs"

here is the brochure from freedom foods

http://www.sonatural.com.au/booklets/Austistic%20Spectrum%20Brochure%20v6.pdf

When all that mad cow disease came out, it was from contaminated grain, it can even go through milk and people can die from that.

Just because chickens can digest something, it still not just stays in the stomach and then bowels and out it goes, everything that

they consume goes through entire bodies, including blood streams, etc....and can affect eggs and their meet and organs. Also people write about what is fed to chickens can affect their eggs, so if they are fed gluten grain, then surely their eggs will be affected to.

Thanku for ur response I have to check this, because I am having problems with eggs and chicken and I think it is because

they are grain fed.

Peace 4 1

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I do not know the answer to your question. But I do know that I cannot eat corn-fed beef, only free range grass-fed organic beef. I don't know if this is due to the corn, or to the antibiotics and hormones they feed the cattle in the feedlots. I also buy only free range eggs and organic chicken because I seem to be having problems with the lectins in gluten grains and corn and I want things to be as pure as possible (that includes the possibility of the problem being hormones and antibiotics again--it is impossible to divorce them at this point).

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I do not know the answer to your question. But I do know that I cannot eat corn-fed beef, only free range grass-fed organic beef. I don't know if this is due to the corn, or to the antibiotics and hormones they feed the cattle in the feedlots. I also buy only free range eggs and organic chicken because I seem to be having problems with the lectins in gluten grains and corn and I want things to be as pure as possible (that includes the possibility of the problem being hormones and antibiotics again--it is impossible to divorce them at this point).

Thanks Mushroom,

I am also going to be looking into grass feeding. My son and I are looking at getting chickens we have a huge yard, but would need to have a coop and then make an area just for them and we would need to feel better, but we are going to wait until we do our allergy tests, incase I have an intolerance to egg protein. W But I also am looking at buying grass fed meats. Haven't previously worried about the grain issue before, but now I have too. We live in an area that does have organics, its rural too, so we are hoping to find something that would suit our needs and yes without antibiotics and hormones as well.

Peace 4 1

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Every grain, livestock, food and celiac expert I've heard of agrees that wheat-fed animals are no threat at all to people with celiac. Just look at the number of celiacs who eat them with no ill effect.

As for mad cow, passing a disease along to an animal through grain is an entirely different matter than whether gluten would make its way through to the meat. If the animal is infected with this disease, of course it can be passed along through milk or meat. They're not at all comparable.

richard

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These animals have digestive systems which break down what they eat and convert it to energy and the building blocks that make up their body. No, there is not a concern of getting gluten from the animals that eat it.

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You need to check your sources on Mad Cow. It is caused by prions which healthy animals get from eating parts of other affected animals which are added to their feed. It is not transmitted by grain.

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The gluten protein molecules are not going to pass into their bodies and muscle tissues intact so that you could get sick from it. If they are bothering you it's not because of gluten, it's an intolerance or allergy to them.

And the other poster was right. Mad cow disease is NOT caused by grains. Like they said, cows were being fed sick things that cows shouldn't be eating.

It's important to be careful not to spread misinformation because we are already limited so much in our diets. Anyone on the internet can write anything they want, but it doesn't mean it's true. You must check with reliable sources for your facts.

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Hello All,

I have a question if Chickens eat grains, then wouldn't that grain affect eggs and their meat, wouldn't what they

consume go through them? Wouldn't the gluten go through to their eggs and be in their meat?

Peace 4 1

I am finding the answer to be YES. My son can eat Foster Farms Chicken, but cannot eat Tyson. When I read that eating a diet of corn makes the foster farms chickens skin and sometimes feathers turn yellow...I began to wonder what Tyson chickens ate. I contacted them. They eat WHEAT. He bleeds when he eats Tyson..does NOT bleed when he eats FF. Proof enough for me....now to track down lunch meats from animals that are not GRAIN fed.

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I am finding the answer to be YES. My son can eat Foster Farms Chicken, but cannot eat Tyson. When I read that eating a diet of corn makes the foster farms chickens skin and sometimes feathers turn yellow...I began to wonder what Tyson chickens ate. I contacted them. They eat WHEAT. He bleeds when he eats Tyson..does NOT bleed when he eats FF. Proof enough for me....now to track down lunch meats from animals that are not GRAIN fed.

What we react to is not always what we think it is. It could well be something else in the Tyson chicken since many seem to have problems with it. On the other hand, I am certainly not denying your son's negative reaction.

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I am finding the answer to be YES. My son can eat Foster Farms Chicken, but cannot eat Tyson. When I read that eating a diet of corn makes the foster farms chickens skin and sometimes feathers turn yellow...I began to wonder what Tyson chickens ate. I contacted them. They eat WHEAT. He bleeds when he eats Tyson..does NOT bleed when he eats FF. Proof enough for me....now to track down lunch meats from animals that are not GRAIN fed.

That's doesn't mean the gluten is getting INTO the meat in an intact form as a result of the animals having eaten it. Animal protein (e.g., that found in muscle) and the plant protein they eat (e.g., the compound gluten, which is made up of the proteins gliadin and glutenin) are entirely different. Animals break down plant matter in digestion to extract things like amino acids, which are then used by their bodies to built things like muscle. If your son is getting a gluten reaction from certain chicken it may well be because that chicken was fed wheat, BUT, the gluten most likely contaminated the meat from fecal contact and/or just from all the wheat dust/debris that is so abundant in the factory farms which use it. It gets all over the animal, some of it remains on their skin & feathers, and it then contaminates the wash which the carcasses pass through in processing, and thereby the meat itself. If Foster Farms uses only corn (if) then their product is likely just as contaminated with corn debris, but this isn't an issue because you don't have a problem with corn. Some say you can wash enough of this away when you get the meat into your kitchen, some say no, or that it depends on your individual sensitivity.

I'm glad though that you've found a product you and your family can use. I would be concerned that every single Foster facility uses no wheat, or even if they don't that they may not change to wheat at any time with no notice.

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I am finding the answer to be YES. My son can eat Foster Farms Chicken, but cannot eat Tyson. When I read that eating a diet of corn makes the foster farms chickens skin and sometimes feathers turn yellow...I began to wonder what Tyson chickens ate. I contacted them. They eat WHEAT. He bleeds when he eats Tyson..does NOT bleed when he eats FF. Proof enough for me....now to track down lunch meats from animals that are not GRAIN fed.

Did you actually contact Foster Farms to find out what they feed their chickens? Or just go by what you read?

nm -- I see they have a statement on their website.

Apparently Tyson adds antibiotic as well.

Edited by Jestgar
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That's doesn't mean the gluten is getting INTO the meat in an intact form as a result of the animals having eaten it. Animal protein (e.g., that found in muscle) and the plant protein they eat (e.g., the compound gluten, which is made up of the proteins gliadin and glutenin) are entirely different. Animals break down plant matter in digestion to extract things like amino acids, which are then used by their bodies to built things like muscle. If your son is getting a gluten reaction from certain chicken it may well be because that chicken was fed wheat, BUT, the gluten most likely contaminated the meat from fecal contact and/or just from all the wheat dust/debris that is so abundant in the factory farms which use it. It gets all over the animal, some of it remains on their skin & feathers, and it then contaminates the wash which the carcasses pass through in processing, and thereby the meat itself. If Foster Farms uses only corn (if) then their product is likely just as contaminated with corn debris, but this isn't an issue because you don't have a problem with corn. Some say you can wash enough of this away when you get the meat into your kitchen, some say no, or that it depends on your individual sensitivity.

I'm glad though that you've found a product you and your family can use. I would be concerned that every single Foster facility uses no wheat, or even if they don't that they may not change to wheat at any time with no notice.

I'd be curious to your reasoning as to why the yellow from the corn transfered and was deposited into the skin and fat and feathers, if it were indeed all broken down an eliminated. Example: If we, as humans, eat enough garlic, our skin begins to smell like garlic. If we take large doeses of vit. b, the mosquitos smell it and they stay away. If our instestines are breaking down protiens and fats into small particles and they are beind distributed thorughout the blood stream, and depoisted into fats, muscle tissues, skin--then what's to keep the grain that animals are fed from doing the same thing? I'd love to have one of their chickens, properly washed and processed in a clean facility, tested. I think we might all be suprirsed at just what passes through, and what is indeed stored in the body.

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In my almost ten years at this, I have never seen any credible evidence that meat of any kind ever contains gluten, unless it is added during processing. I've seen speculation and heard rumors, but never any actual credible evidence. Until I see evidence, I will not believe it.

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Hi Elastigirl, I don't know whether it has to do with the chickens being grain-fed or not, but it could also have to do with the hormones or antibiotics in the chicken. Like a lot of us, your son could be very sensitive to certain foods now, and that may extend to preservatives/growth hormones/etc. Just as some people are very sensitive to xanthan or guar gum, TBHQ, MSG, etc.

It's just a theory...

My own anecdotal experience is that I ate some chicken, got sick, and the next time I picked up some organic/non-treated chicken; and I felt fine. I'll experiment further and let you know if I notice any further connection.

Good luck!

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One thing I have learned is to read the packaging on anything/everything. There are some poultry products out there that brine the birds before packaging and they like to use various gluten products as preservatives. It also seems to be more prevalent in the whole chickens. Got to really love hidden gluten.

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Interesting topic. Started spazzing a bit, and then kept reading, but then realized that my son does fine. Although, I do get my beef and pork from organic grass-fed, no antibiotic given, animals from my father in law's farm :) (we are in WA state - anyone interested...lolol)

Eggs, I get from my parents when their chickens start laying them.

And I do agree, mad cow is from things the cows are fed that they shouldn't be as others stated - not the grain they eat. :o But I know where my beef and pork come from so not an issue there.

I have had to buy eggs from the stores as my parents just got new chicks, but my son is doing fine.

thanks for asking the question - would have never thunk....but to see the replies is good and gets your brain moving.

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One thing I have learned is to read the packaging on anything/everything. There are some poultry products out there that brine the birds before packaging and they like to use various gluten products as preservatives. It also seems to be more prevalent in the whole chickens. Got to really love hidden gluten.

There really is no such thing as hidden gluten. This subject has been addressed in many of the books I have read by medical people on Celiac Disease.

I eat a lot of chicken and have never seen any brining solutions which contain gluten. I do buy all my meats from Whole Foods so maybe they are the exception but brining solution is plain old salt and sugar....no gluten. I have also never seen preservatives with gluten in them either and I am a label reader. Then again, pretty much nothing I buy have preservatives in them so maybe I am out of touch with regular supermarkets. Since wheat is one of the established allergens which has to be listed on an ingredient label, if present, where would gluten be hidden if it came from wheat? It would have to listed as an ingredient. Barley is not one which has to be listed but that's easy enough to figure out if you have been doing your homework on label reading and ingredients. Companies generally list all ingredients in a particular product and not leave any out. Unless a product is heavily processed or breaded/sauced, it should not contain gluten.

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If I remember right from research several years ago; secondary sources are not required to be listed in detail on an ingredient list. What this means is if a manufacturer buys a product - say a spice mix - from another company and then uses that spice mix to make their product they are not required by law to list what's in the spice mix; it's a secondary ingredient. The same would go for things like preservative mixtures and flavorings.

This is why most but not all root beers on the market contain gluten but you may not find gluten listed in the ingredients. There are less than a half dozen makers of root beer flavoring, and every root beer maker, large and small uses one of those flavoring mixes. Roughly half of those flavoring mixtures use barley to make the flavoring. The root beer maker is not required to list the barley in their ingredients, and in fact they may not even know what is in the flavoring they buy.

So yes, "hidden" gluten is possible in any processed food, even if it's not specifically listed in the ingredients. This is why many of us shy away from anything processed that lists things like "Spice Mixture" or "Natural Flavorings" in their ingredients.

There really is no such thing as hidden gluten. This subject has been addressed in many of the books I have read by medical people on Celiac Disease.

I eat a lot of chicken and have never seen any brining solutions which contain gluten. I do buy all my meats from Whole Foods so maybe they are the exception but brining solution is plain old salt and sugar....no gluten. I have also never seen preservatives with gluten in them either and I am a label reader. Then again, pretty much nothing I buy have preservatives in them so maybe I am out of touch with regular supermarkets. Since wheat is one of the established allergens which has to be listed on an ingredient label, if present, where would gluten be hidden if it came from wheat? It would have to listed as an ingredient. Barley is not one which has to be listed but that's easy enough to figure out if you have been doing your homework on label reading and ingredients. Companies generally list all ingredients in a particular product and not leave any out. Unless a product is heavily processed or breaded/sauced, it should not contain gluten.

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I would think that the problem has to be from handling and cross-contamination.

The comparison between spongiform encephalopathy caused by digestion of the animal and wheat digestion of the animal is not really an accurate one.

Most pathogens such as virus, bacteria, and parasites replicate in certain ways, with certain requirements, and respond to at least one of the usual methods of decontamination (e.coli and cooking beef to a proper temperature).

Prions, which are considered responsible for the passage of spongiform encephalopathy--memorize that term, slip it into a sentence, and people will actually think you're smart...works for me :)--can actually hijack normal proteins and mutate them, and unlike the above pathogens, have proven very difficult to eliminate in the usual ways.

A biology and/or genetics person could probably explain this a hundred times better than me. But I guess I think though clearly some contamination (during or after processing) is causing reactions in people, by suggesting that the gluten somehow ends up intact in the animal's muscle tissues after digestion and if I understood correctly, the brochure suggested that the mechanisms for the hypothesized glutenated muscle tissue are the same as those that cause species hopping spongiform encephs and so those authors are spreading misinformation. And whether it is deliberate or not, I think it poses problems because then people stop looking for other more likely explanations and sources of contamination that without the minsinformation, might be caught, eliminated, and thus make some more food safe for the eating.

Both Wiki and google searches can turn up loads of info regarding prions. They kinda scare me, so I don't like to think about them too much. :)

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There really is no such thing as hidden gluten. This subject has been addressed in many of the books I have read by medical people on Celiac Disease.

I eat a lot of chicken and have never seen any brining solutions which contain gluten. I do buy all my meats from Whole Foods so maybe they are the exception but brining solution is plain old salt and sugar....no gluten. I have also never seen preservatives with gluten in them either and I am a label reader. Then again, pretty much nothing I buy have preservatives in them so maybe I am out of touch with regular supermarkets. Since wheat is one of the established allergens which has to be listed on an ingredient label, if present, where would gluten be hidden if it came from wheat? It would have to listed as an ingredient. Barley is not one which has to be listed but that's easy enough to figure out if you have been doing your homework on label reading and ingredients. Companies generally list all ingredients in a particular product and not leave any out. Unless a product is heavily processed or breaded/sauced, it should not contain gluten.

I don't know for sure about chicken, but this past Thanksgiving (my first that was gluten free :D ) I had quite a hard time finding a turkey that did not have a brine that contained gluten. And although it was usually listed from wheat I also saw the phrase "spices and other flavorings" which could have had malt or some other such thing that is made from a gluten containing grain.

That was a turkey though, but now that I think of it, I remember that frozen Tyson chicken sometimes says "contains a solution of...".

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I haven't had too many problems finding a safe Turkey. All my problems have been around chicken....

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There was a documentary out not too long ago (Food, Inc) that had some footage and commentary on the factory farming of chickens - I believe they specifically discussed Tyson, which is the largest producer of chicken. The movie aims to advance a particular point of view, and some of the footage, while not necessarily surprising, is still pretty graphic. As previous posters have pointed out, many of the practices adopted by companies like Tyson involve the use of antibiotics and hormones -- some also use dyes for better color. I go for organic and no hormones or antibiotics. Applegate Farms is one of the brands I like for sliced meats because they don't use hormones/antibiotics, and most of their meats are gluten free (and clearly labeled as such). I've also gotten Nature's Promise brand meats (sliced right in the deli) at Stop-and-Shop. I hear that Boar's Head is gluten-free, but haven't tried it yet.

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I would have to disagree with everyone that says meat cannot contain gluten or that we cannot react to the grains in an animal's diet. Maybe not everyone reacts to it but I believe it is certainly possible. Just because there is not any research on it does not mean a thing, I think we already know that research is a lot of the time behind. I react to grain fed beef (and we're talking organic antibiotic and hormone free grain fed beef) I do not react to grass fed beef. I have always reacted to dairy and just thought that I had a dairy intolerance until I recently decided that maybe it's the grains in dairy that I'm reacting to. I've been eating grass fed dairy without any symptoms. We've been having issues with eggs so I'm on the lookout for some 100% free range eggs to test that theory. I have also read articles (sorry I don't have any on hand but will certainly post them when I can locate them) talking about how cows are not designed to eat grains, their guts are not able to digest them. This intolerance to grains causes leaky gut in the cow and allows food into the bloodstream that would not normally enter the blood stream. Dairy, if you think about it it totally makes sense. Babies everywhere are reacting to the gluten in a mother's diet, both my girls did. Would it not make perfect sense that we would react to dairy (a cow's breastmilk) in the same way. It would be really nice if there was some research done on all this but the lack of it is not going to stop me from listening to my body. And that's what I would encourage anyone to do, listen to your body.

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