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Falling Off The Gluten-Free Wagon
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I've been gluten free for a week, and I already slipped. I love cold cereal with milk, and I miss it so much! Last night, I ate rice krispies. I'm pretty sure it's not gluten free, but I figured since it's made from rice, it wouldn't be as bad as some others. I have terrible insomnia right now, and late at night is the hardest time to stay on the diet. I don't know how I'm going to do this the rest of my life. It's especially hard because here in Saudi Arabia there's no gluten free food available, and I haven't ordered anything online yet. I'm so frustrated. Just starting to have a reaction to what I ate last night. It's been about 18 hrs, and I'm starting to have face flushing, hives, and what I think is kidney pain. I started getting it lately when I'm sick. It's so not worth it! Please help if you have any suggestions for kicking gluten for good...

Also, I've read a lot about people having problems with corn. Last night, I ate some popcorn with just salt at the movies, and I started coughing a lot. I always do, and I always thought it was just because of the husks in the popcorn, but now I'm wondering if I have a problem with corn. Any thoughts?

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I have terrible insomnia right now, .............. and I'm starting to have face flushing, hives, and what I think is kidney pain. I started getting it lately when I'm sick. It's so not worth it!

Eating gluten-free is a choice. If a bowl of cereal is worth feeling as you do, then how can any of us change your mind?

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Eating gluten-free is a choice. If a bowl of cereal is worth feeling as you do, then how can any of us change your mind?

A bowl of cereal is not worth it, that's why I was asking for some words of wisdom and support. This is a very difficult transition. I'm having a very hard time, and I feel like crying after reading your reply. I was afraid of getting unsupportive answers like yours when I posted this, but I decided to think positively. If you didn't have something kind to say, why did you even reply? Keep your mean thoughts to yourself!

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Hello Kare:

It sounds like you have having a hard time finding resources in Saudi.

I did a search for you and found these recipes:

http://www.recipezaar.com/recipes/saudi-arabian

It sounds like you will have to do most of your cooking and eating at home and then carrying food with you.

These recipes will have all of the ingredients available locally. But you will have to substitute the couscous in some of them to rice.

Many of the recipes on the above page are gluten free.

Also can you have someone who knows the area better investigate so perhaps you can get the supplies you need from Dubai or Qatar?

I even did a regular internet search on celiac disease + saudi arabia and came up with some medical papers for physicians who were at Saudi hospitals and universities. Their emails were also present. If you do that search you will find them and perhaps you can contact them and see if there are any resources in the country that they would know about.

As for corn, that can cause a problem too.

Best stick to unprocessed foods, maybe try some of the recipes on the website above and do your best.

I am almost certain that rice krispies have barley in them in the form of malt which is common to most cereals.

Just take care of yourself, don't beat yourself up and be healthy.

Your body will thank you.

~Allison

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A bowl of cereal is not worth it, that's why I was asking for some words of wisdom and support. This is a very difficult transition. I'm having a very hard time, and I feel like crying after reading your reply. I was afraid of getting unsupportive answers like yours when I posted this, but I decided to think positively. If you didn't have something kind to say, why did you even reply? Keep your mean thoughts to yourself!

I'm not being mean, I'm telling you that your life is under your control. You can choose to feel ill for a bowl of cereal, or you can choose to eat a handful of nuts and feel well. It's entirely up to you.

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This is a good lesson about falling off the wagon. It's not a problem, just get back on. Examine why you ate something that you were pretty sure was not gluten free. There are celiacs everywhere and gluten free food everywhere in the world. All unprocessed meats and veggies are gluten free.

You also may have to give up dairy (and sometimes soy) for a few months while your intestines heal. Think of it this way, every time you eat gluten you start the healing process over. The symptoms you are having because of the Rice Krispies are under your control. It's a good lesson, you suffer. When you are ready to not suffer and to take control of your life you will feel so much better. It's well worth the effort.

Yes, we all would like to give you a good shaking for eating those Rice Krispies. But only because we know how bad you suffer when eating gluten. We've all been right in the dust with you and had to haul ourselves back on the wagon. You can do this!!!

There are many companies in Europe that make gluten free yummy items (Schar and Bi-Aglut are two that I know). You can order online if you can't find products in your local stores.

Are you near King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital? They have done a study on Celiac Disease. You might find some resources there.

Keep us informed about how you are doing.

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I've been gluten free for a week, and I already slipped. I love cold cereal with milk, and I miss it so much! Last night, I ate rice krispies. I'm pretty sure it's not gluten free, but I figured since it's made from rice, it wouldn't be as bad as some others. I have terrible insomnia right now, and late at night is the hardest time to stay on the diet. I don't know how I'm going to do this the rest of my life. It's especially hard because here in Saudi Arabia there's no gluten free food available, and I haven't ordered anything online yet. I'm so frustrated. Just starting to have a reaction to what I ate last night. It's been about 18 hrs, and I'm starting to have face flushing, hives, and what I think is kidney pain. I started getting it lately when I'm sick. It's so not worth it! Please help if you have any suggestions for kicking gluten for good...

Also, I've read a lot about people having problems with corn. Last night, I ate some popcorn with just salt at the movies, and I started coughing a lot. I always do, and I always thought it was just because of the husks in the popcorn, but now I'm wondering if I have a problem with corn. Any thoughts?

I feel your pain. I live next door to you (UAE)and am finding it tough too due to the lack of gluten-free food but even worse the labeling of the food is DIRE :angry: . I haven't deliberately eaten gluten yet but I have toyed with the idea, bad I know. Going gluten free is a MAJOR change of lifestyle. You can't be expected to get it right straight away. I have read so much since going gluten-free and lots of stories by people who knew they needed to be on a gluten-free diet but either didn't/couldn't/or tried half-heartedly! One week in I burst into tears because I wanted toast so badly. I was feeling withdrawals something awful. All you can go is get back in the saddle again. I am reliably informed that once we get the hang of the diet and get accidentally or purposefully glutened, our bodies will react in such a way that we will not want to do it again!! I think I had my first glutening at the weekend. I am not right yet. Lots of trips to the loo :(

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I'm not being mean, I'm telling you that your life is under your control. You can choose to feel ill for a bowl of cereal, or you can choose to eat a handful of nuts and feel well. It's entirely up to you.

I felt your comment was very unsympathetic and derisive. Very surprising given that you are a moderator. It must be nice to have forgotten what it was like at the start of a gluten free diet.

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It really does get easier. Many people find that eating whole foods (meat, veggies, fruit) is the best option for them. Try to just avoid packaged food for a while, if you can, and maybe try one packaged food a week. You will find out which convenience foods work for you and which don't. Once you have your 'go-to' list shopping becomes much less stressful.

Sorry about the toast :( . If there are no good substitutes (and they are expensive and not so good for you anyway.....) maybe you can come up with something that will help the craving, like toasted sesame seeds, or maybe baked cheese or something.

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I felt your comment was very unsympathetic and derisive. Very surprising given that you are a moderator. It must be nice to have forgotten what it was like at the start of a gluten free diet.

I have not forgotten. What I have learned is that people respond differently to different suggestions, and for some, stating the simple truth is what finally convinces them that their health is under their control.

You choose what to eat. Period. You can choose to be ill or not. Period.

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I have not forgotten. What I have learned is that people respond differently to different suggestions, and for some, stating the simple truth is what finally convinces them that their health is under their control.

You choose what to eat. Period. You can choose to be ill or not. Period.

I agree with you completely, Jestgar. I know this transition can be hard for those living in area's where gluten-free food may not be falling off the grocery shelves but people have a choice of whether or not they want to be sick. If they keep cheating, they are choosing to be sick. I see this in my family all the time and yes, I get the same reaction as you did when I tell them it's their choice to be well or not.

I am not trying to be rude to the original poster BUT if you are that easily offended, life is going to one long, difficult ride. It doesn't have to be.

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I have not forgotten. What I have learned is that people respond differently to different suggestions, and for some, stating the simple truth is what finally convinces them that their health is under their control.

You choose what to eat. Period. You can choose to be ill or not. Period.

I kind of do forget what it was like to be just starting out. And I find myself losing patience w/ those who ask questions like, "Is this gluten-free?" and I want to say, "HALLOOOO... read the ingredients!!!" Or people who eat gluten KNOWING they're eating gluten and then are surprised that they get sick!

But I loved to cook before I was diagnosed. I was a label reader from way back so learning to cook gluten free hasn't been that difficult for me. For those who don't cook... I understand how completely daunting it can be!

I also remember being jumped all over when I mentioned very early in my gluten-free adventure years ago that I wasn't so sensitive that I couldn't pick croutons off of salads and blow off any crumbs. People blasted me telling me that I was NOT gluten free if I thought I could do that! They were right, of course... but I was so angry over the responses that I deleted celiac.com from my faves list and vowed never to return! A week later, I came back and thanked the people who blasted me... they were right and I was completely wrong.

So... I try hard to remember how it was starting out and not to be so short w/ my observations so as not to make people already feeling crappy feel even crappier.

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I also remember being jumped all over when I mentioned very early in my gluten-free adventure years ago that I wasn't so sensitive that I couldn't pick croutons off of salads and blow off any crumbs.

I think this is hard for a number of reasons, all of them having to do with this being a screen of typing and not face to face contact. It's difficult to know if someone is meaning to be harsh, or just trying to be firm.

I think it's also hard to accept that we have to take responsibility for ourselves, and someone telling you this may just make you angry, until you are ready for it.

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I felt your comment was very unsympathetic and derisive. Very surprising given that you are a moderator. It must be nice to have forgotten what it was like at the start of a gluten free diet.

Most of us do remember. Most of us still have some wishful fantasy that we could "eat normally" without having any problems.

But jestgar's advice was similar to what I would write: Know that these choices are in your control. There's no secret to not succumbing to a desire for food. There's no special method for making sure you don't fall to a craving. It's a choice each and every time we make food more accessible - from buying that box of cereal, to opening it, to pouring it in the bowl, to picking it up with a spoon. Four times to look at your choices and decide if that's really what you want to do.

Again, this isn't mean "you should have known better", this is "all of this is your choice". A number of us phrase it that way because some people - especially those going through the struggle of transitioning to gluten free - say things like "fall off the wagon" and "couldn't help myself". That implies that you're a passive party to your food consumption. And, you know, a lot of cultures don't encourage people to be present and active in eating, aware of what they're eating, when they're eating, why they're eating, and how they're eating. But that's habit, and all of those things, whether we've been trained out of it or not, are our choices.

There's a zen-like "be present in each moment" aspect to going gluten free - you need to be active in the moment, not in the past (but I've always ate this for comfort) or future (scared of every last bit of food for fear of reaction - the other end of the spectrum ;) ). For some, it's a practice that takes longer to develop than others, but we all have to do it. I wish everyone (regardless of dietary issues) would do it; we'd be healthier!

It really does boil down to "it was your choice to do something you knew would make you sick. if you don't want to be sick, choose not to", but that doesn't mean that it's that simple to get to in real life. only you can figure out how YOU can get there, though.

OK, and potential for flaming me, I'll grant, but here's the truth from my perspective:

It may also be helpful to know, in general, after a number of years on the diet, a lot of us see the "ugh, I chose to eat gluten and now I feel awful. support!" as similar to "ugh, I chose to see what it feels like to put a nail gun to my foot and press the trigger! support!" The latter just doesn't make sense. Not because we think the diet is easy, but because we've made that choice - pick up the nail gun or not - so often that we can more easily see it as a choice, even if we sympathize with your desire (ok, maybe not so much on the nail gun case... except the closet masochists :P). We only want to help you realize the truth of that sooner, since we don't tend to think of food as a nail gun. :) It becomes all the more important to understand the truth of "this is a choice" when you go to your parents 50th wedding anniversary and everyone is pressuring you to eat the fabulous cake that honors your parents, or whatever intense social event tries to convince you to make something other than what you know to be the correct choice.

At the end of the day, the only thing you can do is move on to the next day: forgive yourself - completely - for that choice, and be aware of your choices in the future, making the ones you want. You'll get there; it takes time, but you will get there if you try to, mistakes along the way and all.

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When starting out that tough love kind of response can be hard to swallow!

Instead of dwelling on what went wrong why not take this moment and do something positive - order items from the gluten free mall.

They even have a rice crispy like cereal:

http://www.glutenfreemall.com/catalog/enjoy-life-foods-perkys-crunchy-rice-glutenfree-cereal-p-1571.html

Amazon is also a great resource.

Also, do you have a market where you shop regularly? Talk to the owner, maybe they have resources as well.

Yes, it can be expensive to order these things but if you fill your diet with natural items that you can get locally then the cost won't be so bad. Fill up on fruits, veggies, meats, dairy, rice, quinoa.... whatever you can tolerate as I'm not sure what your other food intolerances are, if any.

Hang in there!

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I feel your pain. I live next door to you (UAE)and am finding it tough too due to the lack of gluten-free food but even worse the labeling of the food is DIRE :angry: . I haven't deliberately eaten gluten yet but I have toyed with the idea, bad I know. Going gluten free is a MAJOR change of lifestyle. You can't be expected to get it right straight away. I have read so much since going gluten-free and lots of stories by people who knew they needed to be on a gluten-free diet but either didn't/couldn't/or tried half-heartedly! One week in I burst into tears because I wanted toast so badly. I was feeling withdrawals something awful. All you can go is get back in the saddle again. I am reliably informed that once we get the hang of the diet and get accidentally or purposefully glutened, our bodies will react in such a way that we will not want to do it again!! I think I had my first glutening at the weekend. I am not right yet. Lots of trips to the loo :(

This is the kind of support I needed. Just someone to understand what I am going through, and offer some advice. Thank you so much!! It's nice to feel like somebody out there understands. I don't intend to deliberately eat something with gluten again, but it's nice to know at least 1 person out there besides me misses some of the food, and thinks about eating the wrong thing once in awhile. I actually finally had a good cry myself today, and it helped some to get out the frustration, etc. I should have tried it sooner. :) It's also nice to hear you are in the UAE, and understand the difficulty of getting gluten free food over here. We should stay in touch and let each other know when we find any kind of resources/food available in this area. Thanks again and take care.

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When starting out that tough love kind of response can be hard to swallow!

Instead of dwelling on what went wrong why not take this moment and do something positive - order items from the gluten free mall.

They even have a rice crispy like cereal:

http://www.glutenfreemall.com/catalog/enjoy-life-foods-perkys-crunchy-rice-glutenfree-cereal-p-1571.html

Amazon is also a great resource.

Also, do you have a market where you shop regularly? Talk to the owner, maybe they have resources as well.

Yes, it can be expensive to order these things but if you fill your diet with natural items that you can get locally then the cost won't be so bad. Fill up on fruits, veggies, meats, dairy, rice, quinoa.... whatever you can tolerate as I'm not sure what your other food intolerances are, if any.

Hang in there!

Thanks! I should make something positive out of this experience. I have been wanting to order from the gluten free mall, and should go ahead and make an order.

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... It's so not worth it! Please help if you have any suggestions for kicking gluten for good...

Also, I've read a lot about people having problems with corn. Last night, I ate some popcorn with just salt at the movies, and I started coughing a lot. I always do, and I always thought it was just because of the husks in the popcorn, but now I'm wondering if I have a problem with corn. Any thoughts?

If you are used to buying your breakfast in boxes, or your dinner in little frozen blocks, or eating out a lot, then it can be quite a change doing the gluten-free diet. It was for me. No More Marie Calendar's quick nuke pot pies for dinner. No more bread, no more beer! I really think eating conveniance foods are just a habit we get into. And habits can be broken and re-directed or remolded into something more healthy. Once you learn to eat more healthy, whole foods, you won't miss your gluten filled foods so much. There are tons of gluten-free recipes on this site, including snacks and candy and such, if you like that kind of thing.

Not eating any processed foods for the first few months will let you skip label reading. And you will get used to making foods from scratch that are good for you.

Mistakes are a great teacher. And we all make them, so just try and learn from yours when they happen. It does seem like many people get more sensitive after they have been off gluten for a while. So you may find yourself having stronger reactions to small amounts of gluten after a while.

Rice, quinoa, beans veggies, fruits, nuts, and meats are a good diet. Just keep reading this site and you will learn lots in a short time. As far as the corn goes, why not just stop eating it for awhile if you think it is a problem? Then challenge it by eating corn for several days. Another thing you can do is an elimination diet, there are plenty of threads here about them. You also might want to search on cross contamination, so you can get familiar with that issue.

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I agree with you completely, Jestgar. I know this transition can be hard for those living in area's where gluten-free food may not be falling off the grocery shelves but people have a choice of whether or not they want to be sick. If they keep cheating, they are choosing to be sick. I see this in my family all the time and yes, I get the same reaction as you did when I tell them it's their choice to be well or not.

I am not trying to be rude to the original poster BUT if you are that easily offended, life is going to one long, difficult ride. It doesn't have to be.

So.... if somebody is overweight is it okay to say "You know fatso you might get more dates if you lose 50 pounds."? Or if somebody has a big nose, is it okay to say "Hey if you got some work done on that nose maybe you wouldn't be so ugly."? The "simple truth" is inappropriate in all sorts of situations. I'm sure there are all sorts of things about you that you'd rather not have others use "simple truth" logic to comment upon, especially when you are emotionally fragile and needing support from HELLO a SUPPORT board.

People are hurting when they first start out on this diet. You lose A LOT when you first find out you have celiac and the grieving process is like a death.

Your post was not kind, not helpful and not necessary and yes as a moderator it's surprising to say the least.

It's not about being easily offended. There are times in life when you can take that sort of treatment and being a newly diagnosed celiac is NOT NOT NOT NOT NOT one of them. If somebody had talked to me like that on here in my first few weeks I would have had a nervous breakdown and I'm one TOUGH Italian girl, just ask my husband. At that time I was a wreck and needed support, from a SUPPORT board.

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This is the kind of support I needed. Just someone to understand what I am going through, and offer some advice. Thank you so much!! It's nice to feel like somebody out there understands. I don't intend to deliberately eat something with gluten again, but it's nice to know at least 1 person out there besides me misses some of the food, and thinks about eating the wrong thing once in awhile. I actually finally had a good cry myself today, and it helped some to get out the frustration, etc. I should have tried it sooner. :) It's also nice to hear you are in the UAE, and understand the difficulty of getting gluten free food over here. We should stay in touch and let each other know when we find any kind of resources/food available in this area. Thanks again and take care.

I sobbed like a baby over never having Guinness again and I don't even drink beer very often. It was just the thought that it's forbidden if I ever get to Ireland and go to an Irish pub. I've cried over lots of foods. Food is culture. Food is family. You can get a PhD in Anthropology and focus on food and culture!

You need to honor your grieving process and let yourself grieve. Make sure you have your "must haves" at home. For me it was pasta so I make sure there is always rice pasta around. Love tinkyada brand. I also keep Betty Crocker gluten free mixes in the pantry for cravings and I always have gluten free rice krispies around. I microwave a few marshmallows and mix them up for an instant rice krispie treat when I have a craving. I buy my gluten free rice krispies at Sprouts, but you probably have to order them. The ones I buy taste the same as the "real" ones.

Don't beat yourself up for cheating, but don't do it again. There isn't much you can't find gluten free. Give yourself what you need to succeed by ordering some foods you have to have around.

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I sobbed like a baby over never having Guinness again and I don't even drink beer very often. It was just the thought that it's forbidden if I ever get to Ireland and go to an Irish pub. I've cried over lots of foods. Food is culture. Food is family. You can get a PhD in Anthropology and focus on food and culture!

You need to honor your grieving process and let yourself grieve. Make sure you have your "must haves" at home. For me it was pasta so I make sure there is always rice pasta around. Love tinkyada brand. I also keep Betty Crocker gluten free mixes in the pantry for cravings and I always have gluten free rice krispies around. I microwave a few marshmallows and mix them up for an instant rice krispie treat when I have a craving. I buy my gluten free rice krispies at Sprouts, but you probably have to order them. The ones I buy taste the same as the "real" ones.

Don't beat yourself up for cheating, but don't do it again. There isn't much you can't find gluten free. Give yourself what you need to succeed by ordering some foods you have to have around.

Thanks so much for ALL your support! It's nice to hear that it was also extremely difficult for you in the beginning. It's not just me. I'm feeling like I'm grieving, but I thought maybe I was being too dramatic or something. Hearing you describe it as that also is really helpful and validating. It seems like people who don't have this don't really get what a big deal it is. ... It's just a change in diet, right?... I don't really blame them, though. How can they understand something they haven't gone through? Thanks again to you and the others on this board who've shared with me their experiences, and given me their support. Also, thanks for the snack suggestions! :) I'm missing those.

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So.... if somebody is overweight is it okay to say "You know fatso you might get more dates if you lose 50 pounds."? Or if somebody has a big nose, is it okay to say "Hey if you got some work done on that nose maybe you wouldn't be so ugly."? The "simple truth" is inappropriate in all sorts of situations. I'm sure there are all sorts of things about you that you'd rather not have others use "simple truth" logic to comment upon, especially when you are emotionally fragile and needing support from HELLO a SUPPORT board.

People are hurting when they first start out on this diet. You lose A LOT when you first find out you have celiac and the grieving process is like a death.

Your post was not kind, not helpful and not necessary and yes as a moderator it's surprising to say the least.

It's not about being easily offended. There are times in life when you can take that sort of treatment and being a newly diagnosed celiac is NOT NOT NOT NOT NOT one of them. If somebody had talked to me like that on here in my first few weeks I would have had a nervous breakdown and I'm one TOUGH Italian girl, just ask my husband. At that time I was a wreck and needed support, from a SUPPORT board.

The simple truth is very appropriate in life today, as it always has been. Your references to fat people was nonsense....you are comparing apples to oranges. Anyone who willingly eats gluten, no matter how new to the game they are, has made a choice and if they don't like a realistic answer when they post on line to a support group, they need to grow up and act like an adult. No one was rude to anyone in this post and under no circumstances do I have to engage in the "hug it out" attitude that is so nauseatingly present today.

Jestgar's answer was appropriate and in no way offensive, even in this overly sensitive world we live in. I agreed with it and stand by my opinion.....which you do not have to like, either. However, my answer was totally appropriate and I will repeat....if you are that easily offended, good luck with life. It throws you all kinds of curve balls and Celiac happens to be one of the easiest. There are far worse diseases to have and many that will kill you a lot faster than undiagnosed celiac disease. Fault me for being direct and looking at the glass half full.....I have just seen too much in my 50 years to get hung up on what I cannot eat.

I was one of the "overjoyed to be diagnosed" ones and I was one week away from a feeding tube at time of diagnosis. There was never one moment when I craved anything with gluten. Does everyone have to be like that? Absolutely not, BUT like others have said, you can re-direct your thoughts to the more positive side of things and then you'll realize that just about anything with gluten can be made without. You can have any gluten-free product you want, with a touch of the keyboard and a mailing address.

Just remember that when you write to a support group, you cannot guarantee that you'll only hear opinions that please you. People were just being honest here and I'm sorry you are having a hard time with that.

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This is really getting to be one of those "interesting" threads. :lol: I am very sure Jestgar didn't mean anything rude or unpleasant in her response. She is very helpful to people on this board and has been for years. A short simple statement can be misinterpreted just a like a long winded response can be. It is just the internet thing, it's hard to determine a person's feelings from a thousand miles away when all you have to go by is typed words.

I suggest we all grab a gluten free beer and chill out. :D Here is a site with a list of gluten-free beers we might be able to find locally or order online. gluten-free doesn't have to be all work and no fun!

Kare101, I know it seems tough at first, I felt less than happy myself at first. Took me quite a while to figure things out and get used to eating differently. But it is so worth it to stick with the diet and learn how to adjust. We ain't bad peeps here, and you are very welcome to be here and rant or vent as needed. If you stick around and read you will find plenty of rants here about the gluten-free diet and all sorts of other things. You will also find lots of people that are willing to help and who have been there before. And basically we are all there now, cause celiac doesn't go away.

http://www.glutenfreepassport.com

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i fall of the gluten-free diet every now and then and boy do i pay for it later lol so yeah it does happen from time to time

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I have massive, terrible, debilitating reactions to gluten, soy, and dairy. And yet. And yet, during Christmas which was a full six months after being gluten free, when my father forbid my sisters and I from cooking and didn't make anything I could eat, I ate things that made me sick. They tasted good at the time--and then the vomiting started two hours later. The joint issues that I'm having months later are either directly related, or indirectly, since the current doctor's thought process is that another autoimmune issue's popped up.

I paid for my choices and when I go home in a couple days (the first time since then), I'm not going to forget that. At this point, I can't forget that. It's okay to screw up, but it's going to hurt. It's going to suck balls. That said, there's always food that you can find, somewhere. Even if it's meat and vegetables. Rice, in its many incarnations. And so on.

That said, I've found a lot of foods that I don't think I would have thought twice about a year ago. Quinoa is really good; there are plenty of gluten free desserts that I've made that utilize things that can be easily found in grocery stores in the US--for instance, peanut butter no-flour cookies, six recipes for which can be found in the recipes section. GFE, glutenfreeeasily, has a bunch of easy recipes. She doesn't believe in using specialty ingredients, which can be quite helpful. (Her pizza recipe, for instance, looks fantastic. I just can't bring myself to eat that much dairy when I know it'll cause hives.)

(And if you're ordering from the gluten free mall, try to buy the Cravings Place Chocolate Chunk cookie mix. All the gluten eaters I make taste test agree that the resultant cookies--or cookie bars--are really, really good.)

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    • Mnoosh,    Can you give us a link to the article you read about the increased risk after being diagnosed and maintaining a strict gluten-free diet??       IMO,   You are over reacting to a misprint or most likely a misread article.
    • Yes!  With dairy, celiacs can often have a temorary lactose intolerance due to damaged intestinal villi (where the enzymes normally are released to digest lactose).  Of course you could be naturally lactose intolerant based on race or age.  It is best to stick to a whole foods diet while you are healing.  Really, is ice cream or potato chips going to provide you with nutritional value?  Stick with naturally gluten free foods like meat, fish, fats,  veggies (even those with carbs like sweet potatoes or winter squash) and fruit.  Avoid that processed junk as you may react to the additives right now.  Later, you can add back in dairy (test) and other foods you miss and crave.   Good luck!  
    • Take a deep breath and calm down!    The incidence of cancer with Celiac Disease is rare.......it can happen but the vast majority of people never have that experience.  You may have somewhat enlarged lymph nodes due to inflammation from undiagnosed Celiac but that will all calm down and go away once you get going on the diet.  Believe me, there are many of us that have things happen during the diagnosis and early recovery period and everything turned out just fine.  There is an elevated risk for some cancers with Celiac but that risk goes back to that of the general population after a couple of years on the gluten-free diet. I cannot remember the exact time frame but it is somewhere between 2-4 years, I think.  So many of us went years without a diagnosis and when it was all figured out, we have gone on to be healthy with little complications.  Really...do  not worry about this.  Concentrate on learning all the ins and outs of this disease and how to live gluten free happily.  We are here to help you and guess what? The diet is not as bad as some make it out to be. Many things can be made gluten free and are every bit as good as their gluten counterparts. The diet may not be convenient but it is not hard. I would not lie to you!   
    • Well....one common symptom that most celiacs have when they are diagnosed (or undiagnosed) is anxiety.  So, there is a risk of cancers, but science has demonstrated that that risk goes down on a gluten free diet (if you have celiac disease).  In goes down to the same risk as those without celiac disease.   I kind of was a basket case.  I drive my family a bit crazy because I was anxious.  I felt a bit stupid too.  I guess I had a little brain fog going on too.  All that resolved after I healed. Welcome to the fourum.  Read our Newbie 101 thread under "Coping" (pinned at the top of the page) and learn about hidden sources of gluten and cross contamination.  I think most of us do not worry about cancer. We mourn the freedom to eat anything anywhere!   I did not have swollen lymph nodes, but I am sure others have and they did not have cancer.  Hopefully, they will chime in and set your mind at ease.  If not, you can search for "lymph nodes" at the top of the page (little magnifying glass).  There are lots of members with the same issue!  
    • I was recently diagnosed as having celiac and to be honest the part I'm having the most trouble with isn't the change in food or lifestyle. I'm really upset about what I've read about the risk of cancer increasing with celiac disease. I think this is playing into my fears because I currently have lymph nodes all over my body-my Doctor says they are not considered swollen or concerning, but I don't usually feel nodes. The lymph nodes and horrible diarrhea for the last 3 weeks were what got me into the the doctor for lab work. My blood work came great so I'm wondering if anyone else experienced lymph nodes reacting when they found out they were celiac? Also how do you deal with anxiety surrounding the increased risk of cancer? Thanks!
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