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Falling Off The Gluten-Free Wagon


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#16 kare101

 
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Posted 15 March 2010 - 12:58 PM

I feel your pain. I live next door to you (UAE)and am finding it tough too due to the lack of gluten-free food but even worse the labeling of the food is DIRE :angry: . I haven't deliberately eaten gluten yet but I have toyed with the idea, bad I know. Going gluten free is a MAJOR change of lifestyle. You can't be expected to get it right straight away. I have read so much since going gluten-free and lots of stories by people who knew they needed to be on a gluten-free diet but either didn't/couldn't/or tried half-heartedly! One week in I burst into tears because I wanted toast so badly. I was feeling withdrawals something awful. All you can go is get back in the saddle again. I am reliably informed that once we get the hang of the diet and get accidentally or purposefully glutened, our bodies will react in such a way that we will not want to do it again!! I think I had my first glutening at the weekend. I am not right yet. Lots of trips to the loo :(



This is the kind of support I needed. Just someone to understand what I am going through, and offer some advice. Thank you so much!! It's nice to feel like somebody out there understands. I don't intend to deliberately eat something with gluten again, but it's nice to know at least 1 person out there besides me misses some of the food, and thinks about eating the wrong thing once in awhile. I actually finally had a good cry myself today, and it helped some to get out the frustration, etc. I should have tried it sooner. :) It's also nice to hear you are in the UAE, and understand the difficulty of getting gluten free food over here. We should stay in touch and let each other know when we find any kind of resources/food available in this area. Thanks again and take care.
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#17 kare101

 
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Posted 15 March 2010 - 01:09 PM

When starting out that tough love kind of response can be hard to swallow!

Instead of dwelling on what went wrong why not take this moment and do something positive - order items from the gluten free mall.

They even have a rice crispy like cereal:
http://www.glutenfre...eal-p-1571.html

Amazon is also a great resource.

Also, do you have a market where you shop regularly? Talk to the owner, maybe they have resources as well.

Yes, it can be expensive to order these things but if you fill your diet with natural items that you can get locally then the cost won't be so bad. Fill up on fruits, veggies, meats, dairy, rice, quinoa.... whatever you can tolerate as I'm not sure what your other food intolerances are, if any.

Hang in there!






Thanks! I should make something positive out of this experience. I have been wanting to order from the gluten free mall, and should go ahead and make an order.
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#18 GFinDC

 
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Posted 15 March 2010 - 01:18 PM

... It's so not worth it! Please help if you have any suggestions for kicking gluten for good...

Also, I've read a lot about people having problems with corn. Last night, I ate some popcorn with just salt at the movies, and I started coughing a lot. I always do, and I always thought it was just because of the husks in the popcorn, but now I'm wondering if I have a problem with corn. Any thoughts?


If you are used to buying your breakfast in boxes, or your dinner in little frozen blocks, or eating out a lot, then it can be quite a change doing the gluten-free diet. It was for me. No More Marie Calendar's quick nuke pot pies for dinner. No more bread, no more beer! I really think eating conveniance foods are just a habit we get into. And habits can be broken and re-directed or remolded into something more healthy. Once you learn to eat more healthy, whole foods, you won't miss your gluten filled foods so much. There are tons of gluten-free recipes on this site, including snacks and candy and such, if you like that kind of thing.

Not eating any processed foods for the first few months will let you skip label reading. And you will get used to making foods from scratch that are good for you.

Mistakes are a great teacher. And we all make them, so just try and learn from yours when they happen. It does seem like many people get more sensitive after they have been off gluten for a while. So you may find yourself having stronger reactions to small amounts of gluten after a while.

Rice, quinoa, beans veggies, fruits, nuts, and meats are a good diet. Just keep reading this site and you will learn lots in a short time. As far as the corn goes, why not just stop eating it for awhile if you think it is a problem? Then challenge it by eating corn for several days. Another thing you can do is an elimination diet, there are plenty of threads here about them. You also might want to search on cross contamination, so you can get familiar with that issue.
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Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul

#19 sandsurfgirl

 
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Posted 15 March 2010 - 07:20 PM

I agree with you completely, Jestgar. I know this transition can be hard for those living in area's where gluten-free food may not be falling off the grocery shelves but people have a choice of whether or not they want to be sick. If they keep cheating, they are choosing to be sick. I see this in my family all the time and yes, I get the same reaction as you did when I tell them it's their choice to be well or not.

I am not trying to be rude to the original poster BUT if you are that easily offended, life is going to one long, difficult ride. It doesn't have to be.



So.... if somebody is overweight is it okay to say "You know fatso you might get more dates if you lose 50 pounds."? Or if somebody has a big nose, is it okay to say "Hey if you got some work done on that nose maybe you wouldn't be so ugly."? The "simple truth" is inappropriate in all sorts of situations. I'm sure there are all sorts of things about you that you'd rather not have others use "simple truth" logic to comment upon, especially when you are emotionally fragile and needing support from HELLO a SUPPORT board.

People are hurting when they first start out on this diet. You lose A LOT when you first find out you have celiac and the grieving process is like a death.

Your post was not kind, not helpful and not necessary and yes as a moderator it's surprising to say the least.



It's not about being easily offended. There are times in life when you can take that sort of treatment and being a newly diagnosed celiac is NOT NOT NOT NOT NOT one of them. If somebody had talked to me like that on here in my first few weeks I would have had a nervous breakdown and I'm one TOUGH Italian girl, just ask my husband. At that time I was a wreck and needed support, from a SUPPORT board.
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Lots of doctors diagnosed me with lots of things including IBS, lactose intolerance, wheat intolerance, and quite a few of them threw up their hands in total confusion.

Had GI symptoms, allergy symptoms and unexplained illness my whole life.

Jan. 2010 Diagnosed celiac at the age of 40.
Ready to get well and get on with my life!

#20 sandsurfgirl

 
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Posted 15 March 2010 - 07:27 PM

This is the kind of support I needed. Just someone to understand what I am going through, and offer some advice. Thank you so much!! It's nice to feel like somebody out there understands. I don't intend to deliberately eat something with gluten again, but it's nice to know at least 1 person out there besides me misses some of the food, and thinks about eating the wrong thing once in awhile. I actually finally had a good cry myself today, and it helped some to get out the frustration, etc. I should have tried it sooner. :) It's also nice to hear you are in the UAE, and understand the difficulty of getting gluten free food over here. We should stay in touch and let each other know when we find any kind of resources/food available in this area. Thanks again and take care.


I sobbed like a baby over never having Guinness again and I don't even drink beer very often. It was just the thought that it's forbidden if I ever get to Ireland and go to an Irish pub. I've cried over lots of foods. Food is culture. Food is family. You can get a PhD in Anthropology and focus on food and culture!

You need to honor your grieving process and let yourself grieve. Make sure you have your "must haves" at home. For me it was pasta so I make sure there is always rice pasta around. Love tinkyada brand. I also keep Betty Crocker gluten free mixes in the pantry for cravings and I always have gluten free rice krispies around. I microwave a few marshmallows and mix them up for an instant rice krispie treat when I have a craving. I buy my gluten free rice krispies at Sprouts, but you probably have to order them. The ones I buy taste the same as the "real" ones.

Don't beat yourself up for cheating, but don't do it again. There isn't much you can't find gluten free. Give yourself what you need to succeed by ordering some foods you have to have around.
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Lots of doctors diagnosed me with lots of things including IBS, lactose intolerance, wheat intolerance, and quite a few of them threw up their hands in total confusion.

Had GI symptoms, allergy symptoms and unexplained illness my whole life.

Jan. 2010 Diagnosed celiac at the age of 40.
Ready to get well and get on with my life!

#21 kare101

 
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Posted 16 March 2010 - 01:45 AM

I sobbed like a baby over never having Guinness again and I don't even drink beer very often. It was just the thought that it's forbidden if I ever get to Ireland and go to an Irish pub. I've cried over lots of foods. Food is culture. Food is family. You can get a PhD in Anthropology and focus on food and culture!

You need to honor your grieving process and let yourself grieve. Make sure you have your "must haves" at home. For me it was pasta so I make sure there is always rice pasta around. Love tinkyada brand. I also keep Betty Crocker gluten free mixes in the pantry for cravings and I always have gluten free rice krispies around. I microwave a few marshmallows and mix them up for an instant rice krispie treat when I have a craving. I buy my gluten free rice krispies at Sprouts, but you probably have to order them. The ones I buy taste the same as the "real" ones.

Don't beat yourself up for cheating, but don't do it again. There isn't much you can't find gluten free. Give yourself what you need to succeed by ordering some foods you have to have around.



Thanks so much for ALL your support! It's nice to hear that it was also extremely difficult for you in the beginning. It's not just me. I'm feeling like I'm grieving, but I thought maybe I was being too dramatic or something. Hearing you describe it as that also is really helpful and validating. It seems like people who don't have this don't really get what a big deal it is. ... It's just a change in diet, right?... I don't really blame them, though. How can they understand something they haven't gone through? Thanks again to you and the others on this board who've shared with me their experiences, and given me their support. Also, thanks for the snack suggestions! :) I'm missing those.
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#22 Gemini

 
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Posted 16 March 2010 - 07:45 AM

So.... if somebody is overweight is it okay to say "You know fatso you might get more dates if you lose 50 pounds."? Or if somebody has a big nose, is it okay to say "Hey if you got some work done on that nose maybe you wouldn't be so ugly."? The "simple truth" is inappropriate in all sorts of situations. I'm sure there are all sorts of things about you that you'd rather not have others use "simple truth" logic to comment upon, especially when you are emotionally fragile and needing support from HELLO a SUPPORT board.

People are hurting when they first start out on this diet. You lose A LOT when you first find out you have celiac and the grieving process is like a death.

Your post was not kind, not helpful and not necessary and yes as a moderator it's surprising to say the least.



It's not about being easily offended. There are times in life when you can take that sort of treatment and being a newly diagnosed celiac is NOT NOT NOT NOT NOT one of them. If somebody had talked to me like that on here in my first few weeks I would have had a nervous breakdown and I'm one TOUGH Italian girl, just ask my husband. At that time I was a wreck and needed support, from a SUPPORT board.


The simple truth is very appropriate in life today, as it always has been. Your references to fat people was nonsense....you are comparing apples to oranges. Anyone who willingly eats gluten, no matter how new to the game they are, has made a choice and if they don't like a realistic answer when they post on line to a support group, they need to grow up and act like an adult. No one was rude to anyone in this post and under no circumstances do I have to engage in the "hug it out" attitude that is so nauseatingly present today.

Jestgar's answer was appropriate and in no way offensive, even in this overly sensitive world we live in. I agreed with it and stand by my opinion.....which you do not have to like, either. However, my answer was totally appropriate and I will repeat....if you are that easily offended, good luck with life. It throws you all kinds of curve balls and Celiac happens to be one of the easiest. There are far worse diseases to have and many that will kill you a lot faster than undiagnosed celiac disease. Fault me for being direct and looking at the glass half full.....I have just seen too much in my 50 years to get hung up on what I cannot eat.

I was one of the "overjoyed to be diagnosed" ones and I was one week away from a feeding tube at time of diagnosis. There was never one moment when I craved anything with gluten. Does everyone have to be like that? Absolutely not, BUT like others have said, you can re-direct your thoughts to the more positive side of things and then you'll realize that just about anything with gluten can be made without. You can have any gluten-free product you want, with a touch of the keyboard and a mailing address.

Just remember that when you write to a support group, you cannot guarantee that you'll only hear opinions that please you. People were just being honest here and I'm sorry you are having a hard time with that.
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#23 GFinDC

 
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Posted 16 March 2010 - 02:48 PM

This is really getting to be one of those "interesting" threads. :lol: I am very sure Jestgar didn't mean anything rude or unpleasant in her response. She is very helpful to people on this board and has been for years. A short simple statement can be misinterpreted just a like a long winded response can be. It is just the internet thing, it's hard to determine a person's feelings from a thousand miles away when all you have to go by is typed words.

I suggest we all grab a gluten free beer and chill out. :D Here is a site with a list of gluten-free beers we might be able to find locally or order online. gluten-free doesn't have to be all work and no fun!

Kare101, I know it seems tough at first, I felt less than happy myself at first. Took me quite a while to figure things out and get used to eating differently. But it is so worth it to stick with the diet and learn how to adjust. We ain't bad peeps here, and you are very welcome to be here and rant or vent as needed. If you stick around and read you will find plenty of rants here about the gluten-free diet and all sorts of other things. You will also find lots of people that are willing to help and who have been there before. And basically we are all there now, cause celiac doesn't go away.

http://www.glutenfreepassport.com
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Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul

#24 babygirl1234

 
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Posted 16 March 2010 - 03:47 PM

i fall of the gluten-free diet every now and then and boy do i pay for it later lol so yeah it does happen from time to time
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#25 AKcollegestudent

 
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Posted 17 March 2010 - 02:03 PM

I have massive, terrible, debilitating reactions to gluten, soy, and dairy. And yet. And yet, during Christmas which was a full six months after being gluten free, when my father forbid my sisters and I from cooking and didn't make anything I could eat, I ate things that made me sick. They tasted good at the time--and then the vomiting started two hours later. The joint issues that I'm having months later are either directly related, or indirectly, since the current doctor's thought process is that another autoimmune issue's popped up.

I paid for my choices and when I go home in a couple days (the first time since then), I'm not going to forget that. At this point, I can't forget that. It's okay to screw up, but it's going to hurt. It's going to suck balls. That said, there's always food that you can find, somewhere. Even if it's meat and vegetables. Rice, in its many incarnations. And so on.

That said, I've found a lot of foods that I don't think I would have thought twice about a year ago. Quinoa is really good; there are plenty of gluten free desserts that I've made that utilize things that can be easily found in grocery stores in the US--for instance, peanut butter no-flour cookies, six recipes for which can be found in the recipes section. GFE, glutenfreeeasily, has a bunch of easy recipes. She doesn't believe in using specialty ingredients, which can be quite helpful. (Her pizza recipe, for instance, looks fantastic. I just can't bring myself to eat that much dairy when I know it'll cause hives.)

(And if you're ordering from the gluten free mall, try to buy the Cravings Place Chocolate Chunk cookie mix. All the gluten eaters I make taste test agree that the resultant cookies--or cookie bars--are really, really good.)
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#26 acaligal

 
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Posted 17 March 2010 - 03:50 PM

I feel your pain. This is week 3 for me gluten free and I get so tempted to cheat. At first I was terrified of going gluten free, but once I did some research, its gotten easier and less expensive.

Here's a few things I've found to be quick and easy meals:

For breakfast: Chex with mixed nuts and dried fruit (easy on the go), cream of buckwheat, or yogurt and fruit smoothie
Snacks: flavored rice cake with peanut butter, apples and cheese, carrots with hummus
Lunch: grilled sausage with grilled veggies, meat and cheese wrapped in corn tortillas
For dinner: grilled fish or chicken and rice or potatoes.

I've had the hardest time with bread. UDI is pretty good gluten free bread. Its a little dry but tastes so much better when toasted or used for paninis. I also ordered some almond flour online and I'm experimenting baking my own breads.
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#27 AKcollegestudent

 
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Posted 17 March 2010 - 07:57 PM

I feel your pain. This is week 3 for me gluten free and I get so tempted to cheat. At first I was terrified of going gluten free, but once I did some research, its gotten easier and less expensive.

Here's a few things I've found to be quick and easy meals:

For breakfast: Chex with mixed nuts and dried fruit (easy on the go), cream of buckwheat, or yogurt and fruit smoothie
Snacks: flavored rice cake with peanut butter, apples and cheese, carrots with hummus
Lunch: grilled sausage with grilled veggies, meat and cheese wrapped in corn tortillas
For dinner: grilled fish or chicken and rice or potatoes.



Just going to caution you: I know myself and others on the board have had CC reactions to Chex, and many dried fruits are processed in places that process wheat. And Lundberg is one of the few rice cakes I haven't had CC (or more severe) reactions to, especially when it comes to flavored. And, as I learned the hard way, watch out for the fillers in many brands of sausage--they often contain wheat.

(Not saying that these aren't all good ideas, just be careful.)
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#28 lbv6684

 
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Posted 18 March 2010 - 03:46 AM

:rolleyes:That first week or two for me was spent in a panic state. I was panicked over what I couldn't eat. I am only in week 6 but have already made some realizations. I really had to try to spend time thinking about WHY this was such a big problem for me, after all it's only food right?!

For each of us food has different meanings. For some people food is used (as it should be) to keep them alive, without it they would die for obvious reasons. That being said gluten free living could be easy. For most people, me included, food is joy. Food is used to show love, to feel love. Most of us gather around some form of a community table (even in the most remote regions of the world). Humans have for the most part lost prespective on the fact that we just need to feed ourselves for energy, and made food almost worthy of Godly status. Take a few minutes today to realize this when you watch television, read a magazine, or drive by a billboard. I am trying to learn to put less emphasis on what I can't eat, and more emphasis on other things in my life that I CAN do. Once you start to realize how powerless food is over you, I think things become easier.

I have actually developed a taste aversion to some foods that contain gluten. Sort of like the first time you indulged in too much alcohol and got ill (its been 28 years since I drank that Southern Comfort and darn it I still shudder at the thought). Glutenous (is there such a spelling) foods have actually become that for me. I don't want to be sick, and so the illness outweighs the comfort of the food (that inanimate object that has no control over you!).

You can do this Kare. Use all of the info you get here, even the stuff that you find hurtful to help you rise above this. We are fortunate to have such an opportunity to even be able to read this!Its difficult, but do-able for sure! Everyone be well! Peace to all!
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#29 kare101

 
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Posted 18 March 2010 - 08:19 AM

:rolleyes:That first week or two for me was spent in a panic state. I was panicked over what I couldn't eat. I am only in week 6 but have already made some realizations. I really had to try to spend time thinking about WHY this was such a big problem for me, after all it's only food right?!

For each of us food has different meanings. For some people food is used (as it should be) to keep them alive, without it they would die for obvious reasons. That being said gluten free living could be easy. For most people, me included, food is joy. Food is used to show love, to feel love. Most of us gather around some form of a community table (even in the most remote regions of the world). Humans have for the most part lost prespective on the fact that we just need to feed ourselves for energy, and made food almost worthy of Godly status. Take a few minutes today to realize this when you watch television, read a magazine, or drive by a billboard. I am trying to learn to put less emphasis on what I can't eat, and more emphasis on other things in my life that I CAN do. Once you start to realize how powerless food is over you, I think things become easier.

I have actually developed a taste aversion to some foods that contain gluten. Sort of like the first time you indulged in too much alcohol and got ill (its been 28 years since I drank that Southern Comfort and darn it I still shudder at the thought). Glutenous (is there such a spelling) foods have actually become that for me. I don't want to be sick, and so the illness outweighs the comfort of the food (that inanimate object that has no control over you!).

You can do this Kare. Use all of the info you get here, even the stuff that you find hurtful to help you rise above this. We are fortunate to have such an opportunity to even be able to read this!Its difficult, but do-able for sure! Everyone be well! Peace to all!

More good advice and kind support....All of you supportive, helpful people who've commented on this subject have really meant a lot to me. I think I've gained strength, and a new way of looking at things. Not that it's always going to be easy, but I think it will get easier and easier. My sincere appreciation to all!:)
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#30 Lgood22573

 
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Posted 18 March 2010 - 12:06 PM

You are not alone. I think about eating the wrong foods ALL THE TIME. I have a young child, and I end up at some pot luck function (where everyone brings a dish or food) at least once a week. I just watch (starving) and politely say "I'm not hungry". It's truly awful, but it's so much worse to be sick. I broke down last week after 4 strict months of being gluten free. I kept watching all those kids eat all that junk, and we had to take some home. After everyone went to bed, I got out the bag of sunchips and ate 4 of them. Immediately, I was overwhelmed with panic wondering what would happen. I ended up hugging the toilet from both ends all night long. I will never do that again- NEVER. For each one of us, it is a struggle depending where you are on your journey. I'm sorry you are discouraged. I hope you get some help and support. For me, I still miss the food even though I know what it does to me. Eventually, I will come to terms with it. We all have to.
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