Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

'dedicated' Fast Food Fryers
0

33 posts in this topic

For the record - I'm not a paranoid person (well, maybe now I am...)

I went to a Wendy's today and asked the girl at the register if the french fries are cooked in a fryer that only cooks french fries.

At first she said yes, then she paused and said: 'Well, we're not SUPPOSED to put anything else in those two fryers except french fries, but sometimes we cook other things in there...' And she shrugged sheepishly.

So I explained that if anything that's breaded has been in the fryer, then I really shouldn't eat the fries.

It wasn't busy, so the drive thru guy who was listening in pipes up: 'Oh, then don't order fries! In fact, I won't let you!'

Two men who looked like an assistant manager and manager were also listening in, but they didn't say anything.

If a different person had been at the register, would that person have told me the fries were safe? Their official protocol at that Wendy's is that the french fryers are dedicated - but in practice, and probably depending on the shift and personnel, they aren't dedicated according to two people on duty today. (I was there at 3pm - not usually the shift when the renegade rule-breakers work.)

Like I said, I'm not a paranoid person, but now I'm sad because I think I'm going to become paranoid about 'dedicated' fryers...

Back in high school I worked at a Burger King, and we had fryers at different temperatures with different oil for fries and breaded items, and still there would be employees who would cook the wrong thing in the wrong fryer if they were in a pinch.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

This is a popular topic here.

At any restaurant there is always a risk of cross-contamination. Fast food places may be a higher risk. At McDonalds, the fryers are physically separated and operated by different staff. The fries and hash browns are fried in dedicated fryers at the front of the store by the window crew. Everything else is fried in the back of the store by the grill crew.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, at one Wendy's (haven't noticed at others, I saw workers putting a fried something else (can't remember what) in a rack right above the french fryers, I guess to keep warm. Strong chance of crumbs falling in. I've eaten Wendy's fries in the past and have never had suspected a reaction to them, but they're off my list now.

richard

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We stick to the chili, baked potatoes, and frosty's at Wendy's. I've seen most Wendy's put chix nuggets right next to the fries to keep them warm.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the record - I'm not a paranoid person (well, maybe now I am...)

I went to a Wendy's today and asked the girl at the register if the french fries are cooked in a fryer that only cooks french fries.

At first she said yes, then she paused and said: 'Well, we're not SUPPOSED to put anything else in those two fryers except french fries, but sometimes we cook other things in there...' And she shrugged sheepishly.

So I explained that if anything that's breaded has been in the fryer, then I really shouldn't eat the fries.

It wasn't busy, so the drive thru guy who was listening in pipes up: 'Oh, then don't order fries! In fact, I won't let you!'

Two men who looked like an assistant manager and manager were also listening in, but they didn't say anything.

If a different person had been at the register, would that person have told me the fries were safe? Their official protocol at that Wendy's is that the french fryers are dedicated - but in practice, and probably depending on the shift and personnel, they aren't dedicated according to two people on duty today. (I was there at 3pm - not usually the shift when the renegade rule-breakers work.)

Like I said, I'm not a paranoid person, but now I'm sad because I think I'm going to become paranoid about 'dedicated' fryers...

Back in high school I worked at a Burger King, and we had fryers at different temperatures with different oil for fries and breaded items, and still there would be employees who would cook the wrong thing in the wrong fryer if they were in a pinch.

I would never eat at a fast food joint, period, because this is what I would expect to happen. If you go to a better quality restaurant where the staff has had some food education, this is highly unlikely to happen.

I frequent a couple of restaurants near to me, not chains or fast food places, and they have dedicated fryers. What I like is they have dedicated french fry fryers and everyone gets the gluten-free version. I'm sure if they were advertised as being gluten-free fries, people would freak out and not want to order them....you know how that goes. :D

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




The only french fries I will eat out is Red Robin who have a gluten free menu and a dedicated fryer, Chick-fil-a who have dedicated fryers and every manager guarantees that the chicken is not mixed with the fries. Other than that is not worth the chance when you can make Ore-Ida and Alexi's at home!

I do not eat any fast food french fries of the main brands Wendys, BK, MCDonald's etc..

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, you have to have a restaurant that understands gluten issues and has trained it's staff about the dedicated fryer. I remember way back in high school we would fry all sorts of weird food things in the fryer, never thinking about CC. Could not be further from a 16 year-old's mind. Also, I remember in a Mexican restaurant the staff normally fried the corn chips in one fryer, but after a shift they would fry the flour tortillas to make flour chips.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't eat at fast food just because remembering back to high school. We fried everything from whole cheese burgers to salt and pepper shakers (that didn't come out so well) B)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chick-fil-a has dedicated friers, although I would ask. If someone wants to eat out while we are shopping or something, I stop there and get some fries.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chick-fil-a has dedicated friers, although I would ask. If someone wants to eat out while we are shopping or something, I stop there and get some fries.

So we can eat Chik-Fil-A waffle fries? I miss those.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So we can eat Chik-Fil-A waffle fries? I miss those.

Check the Chick fil a web site. The I would check with the manager at the one you go to just to be certain.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can only speak about my Mcdonalds (inside our Walmart). These versions are smaller and have a more limited menu. You can clearly see the entire kitchen and what everyone is doing.

Peter is correct. The fries station is right at the front. It is operated by the counter personel, not the "cooks". The counter people take your order, cook the fries, make the drinks & deserts, put the (already wrapped)food in bags, and give it to you. They do not cook burgers, chicken, biscuits, or anything else but fries.

My son worked there in high school. They have a very well trained staff, and run that place by the book. The book is very specific concerning how the store is operated.

I'm not concerned in the least about the dedicated fryers at my Mcdonalds. And no, I don't believe the fries contain gluten either.

best regards, lm

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I trust no fryers after a couple incidents involving a 'dedicated' fryer. In fact now unless I know it is a place that is specifically celiac or gluten-free aware and trained I don't generally eat out. Which is frustrating.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5Fast food - 5 guys - they only thing on their menu - french fries.

I've been told that the fryer is not necessarily dedicated at nice restaurants too - Cantina Laredo - which lists tortilla chips on the gluten free menu. But the wait staff told me that they might throw in a wheat chip every so often. I've written Cantina Laredo, but no response.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i am really shocked at how many celiacs eat fast food - y'all are braver than i am! i wouldn't eat at any fast food restaurant, ever - i just shudder at their menus with all the grease, fat and salt. plus, their kitchens are usually a disaster area. i really do not want 16 year olds who barely make minimum wage and have probably only worked there for about 2 days and don't know enough to wash their hands after using the bathroom touching my food, never mind trying to wrap their head around the concept of "gluten free."

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll eat fries at In-n-Out Burger, but there is nothing on their menu that is deep fried other than the fries, which they make on the spot from fresh potatoes. They're good about keeping the lettuce wrapped burgers away from crumbs too, if you tell them you have a wheat allergy.

Other than that, french fries are gluten roulette for me.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to add to this: I've always had a good experience at fast food restaurants. And all those "sixteen year olds" have been very careful about my food and letting everyone know what I need. I've not been glutened by McD's yet, and it's a nice change to not always make my own food.

And let's not malign the fast food workers! We're all one pink slip away! :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please don't assume everyone that works at a fast-food place is a stupid 16-year-old. I'm a professional, but if I ever got tossed out on the street, and was having trouble finding a job, I would not hesitate to work at a fast-food restaurant. There are many people working at fast-food places that are very over-qualified, especially in these economic times. We travel a lot with family located at least 300 miles away, and sometimes the only places available are fast-food. We tend to eat at Wendy's because of their many gluten-free options.

I am very pleased, however, to find out about McDonalds fries and hash browns. We weren't sure about McDonalds before. Thanks to everyone for all the good information.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

when i was a teenager i worked at mcdonald's, so i know whereof i speak. the kitchen was not the cleanest, most sanitary place. i also put myself through college waiting tables, and i am not maligning servers at all. in any case, i try to stay away from fast food because it is so full of sodium. if y'all have had good luck eating fast food, then that's great. i just don't like it and wouldn't trust it. my opinion.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mcdonalds french fries are NOT gluten free they put a additive in the fries before cooking its not the oil you have to worry about!!!! I repeat NOT gluten free they have wheat proteins !!!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the United States (and only in the United States) there is a wheat derivative used at the plant where McDonalds fries are manufactured. That derivative, along with a dairy derivative, is used to make a beef flavor. That flavor is added to the oil in which the product is partially fried before being frozen and shipped.

At the store, the frying process is completed. The oil used at the store is different from the oil used at the plant, and has no flavor.

The finished product has been independently tested by a recognized expert at the University of Nebraska. Using the most sensitive test available, no gluten was detected in the fries.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As an adult I worked at a fast food place. I have seen that they can not be trusted. A dedicated fryer stays dedicated until a bus load of customers arrives. Then it's just as stated: a fryer dedicated to frying whatever is needed. After all it's a fast food place.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After all it's a fast food place.

Exactly my point. If you are concerned about the undetectable possible gluten level from the flavor, why on earth are you going anywhere near a restaurant, especially a fast food one...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mcdonalds french fries are NOT gluten free they put a additive in the fries before cooking its not the oil you have to worry about!!!! I repeat NOT gluten free they have wheat proteins !!!

maybe this is why i wanted to gag at the smell of someone's mcdonald's fries when i was walking behind them at the mall!

haha

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just learned something very unnerving. Called a Wendy’s restaurant and asked if they had seperate fryer for fries and all things breaded. They say “Yes”. I press the issue a little futher telling the manager my Gluten concerns to which he responds…Well we do mix all the oils together when we strain the food bits out then re-populate the separate fryer with the mixed oil.

 

Not an expert but this sounds like a real problem. Press the issue folks. Separate fryers are useless if they mix the oil together.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,681
    • Total Posts
      921,724
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Ok, I can't seem to find my first lot of blood tests that were done for Celiac screening, they did include TTG I remember that much, and I am getting another copy of it but another test did come in today.  I don't know how different tests are done around the world and I don't get all the medical jargon but this is what it states, ******************************************************************************* HLA DR/DQ Genotyping for Coeliac Disease, Specimen type : EDTA blood Method : Detection of sequence-specific oligonucleotides (Gen-Probe). HLA-DR - 1, 13          DRB1 - 01, 13 HLA-DQ - 5,6        HLA-DQA1 - 5,6      HLA-DB1 - 05, 06 Interpretation : No genotype susceptibility for coeliac disease.  The DQ2 and DQ8 antigens associated with increased risk of coeliac disease were not identified in this patient.  In the absence of these antigens, coeliac disease is extremely unlikely.   *******************************************************************************   I have read the horror stories of blood tests and scope biopsies not be done right or flawed but here is what I do know as of now, At the moment the most non invasive test I can have done say negative.  I have double scopes (endoscopy and colonoscopy) booked for the 12th of October with results from biopsies expected a week or two after. Chances are they will show, a) signs of coeliac disease (even if the odds are low it can still happen), b) show signs of something else entirely and we will be busy dealing with the ramifications of that or c) it will show no signs of coeliac but I will still be suffering from gluten sensitivity (which is harder/impossible to measure clinically). My GP has told me that stress and anxiety can be a cause of all the symptoms I have been experiencing and suggests if the scopes show nothing that I may benefit from something to treat anxiety, i.e. antidepressants.  Not in a, "Oh we don't know what it is so have these," kind of way, he agrees with the thought that the scopes could indeed show coeliac, something else or even be negative. I did tell him that I could have a sensitivity and that even without benefit of clinical results, some people have gone on a gluten elimination diet for a period of time to see if they get any relief.  My question is this, if the scopes come up negative and I try eliminating gluten, how long would it be before I saw any results or improvements?  I have read enough here and elsewhere to know that everybody is different, some see results within days, some see results longer but are there any guidelines for how long a test like this should be undertaken for?  I have heard everything thing from two weeks to two months.  All of this is entirely moot at this point but I know that even if the results said clear, there would always be a little part of me that wonders if it could be a sensitivity that is the problem.  Any thoughts or advice greatly appreciated, and a thank you to all those who have taken the time to respond and offer advice and encouragement so far.        
    • We don't delete accounts but can delete any personal information and change your screen name if you would like. Just send me a personal message with three possible screen names. For the record you can edit most things in your account area with the exception of your screen name.
    • Thanks I never heard of that dye before, I guess I have to find more natural meat thanks for the suggestion. 
    • Yes, I only eat one meal a day. Sometimes salad or fries or whatever I can find. And thanks for the replies again.
    • A colonoscopy is not used to diagnose celiac disease.  An endoscopy is used to obtain biopsies in the small intestine.  
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,680
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    Misalina
    Joined