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Gluten Free Grains - Sorting The Myths From The Truth


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#1 inmygenes

 
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Posted 15 April 2010 - 09:43 AM

There seem to be a lot of myths flying around and it's hard to know what to believe sometimes. Here are some of them:

QUINOA My natropath seemed to think quinoa contained some gluten. Actually it seems that quinoa is not even a grain but a seed related to leafy green vegetables like spinach. So it's totally gluten free, it makes me bloated, but maybe that's a contamination issue? Bobs Mill sell a gluten-free quinoa.

Millet I came across one website recently that was saying Millet contained gluten, another myth! Millet is a gluten free grain.

Oats Myth: oats are not gluten free. They contain no gluten it seems, as long as they are free from contamination, but they do contain a protein that is similar to gluten. I have eaten 'pure oats' and they definitely tend to upset my stomach if I eat too many, so I guess I'm sensitive to the protein they contain.

Have you come across other myths about gluten free grains? Do you eat oats and do you get a reaction from them?
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#2 Roda

 
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Posted 16 April 2010 - 04:53 AM

Quinoa--I eat it all the time and love it. It is easy for me to eat too much. It has lots of fiber.

Millett--Love it too. No problems that I can tell.

Oats--I avoid the gluten free oats because I reacted horribly. I had heartburn, bloating, abdominal pain, constipation and a nice painful rash on my bottom. :o There are those who eat them without incident (I'm jelous! :lol: )

I would recommend not buying from bulk bins. The store that sells this in bulk around me had oat groats in the buckwheat! Sucks. How hard would it be to have the gluten grains separate from the gluten free ones?
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Me:
Celiac disease(positive blood work/biopsy- 10/2008), gluten free oat intolerent, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis/Disease, Raynaud's Disease


DS2(age 9):
celiac disease(positive IgA tTG, no biopsy- 11/2010)


DS1(age 13):
repeated negative bloodwork and negative EGD/biopsy. Started on a gluten free trial(8/2011). He has decided to stay gluten free due to all of the improvements he has experienced on the diet.


#3 inmygenes

 
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Posted 16 April 2010 - 07:18 AM

That's good that you love the quinoa and can eat it no problem. Yes I'm jealous of those that can eat oats too, I definitely get a bit of a reaction.
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#4 GFinDC

 
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Posted 16 April 2010 - 03:09 PM

The CSA had an article about celiacs who react to oats a while back.
I seem to remember them saying there are something like 10 to 15% of celiacs who do react to oats. I used to eat oats all the time, but I can 't do them anymore.

Quinoa is supposed to be rinsed well before cooking as it has a natural coating on the seeds that can irritate some people's stomachs. So, that might be an issue. It needs to well rinsed to get rid of that coating.
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#5 VioletBlue

 
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Posted 17 April 2010 - 11:44 PM

Buckwheat is not actually wheat, or even a grain. It is also a seed and is gluten free.
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#6 mushroom

 
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Posted 18 April 2010 - 12:02 AM

There is a high degree of contamination with oats. Often they are harvested with the same equipment as wheat, stored in the same silos as wheat, and/or transported with the same equipment as wheat. But as was previously stated, even if the oats are certified gluten free and have been carefully handled, a certain percentage of celiacs will still react to them.
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#7 Roda

 
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Posted 18 April 2010 - 03:36 PM

Buckwheat is not actually wheat, or even a grain. It is also a seed and is gluten free.

Good info for those who are not aware that buckwheat is gluten free. My complaint with the bulk bins was with the oats. I don't eat oats, even gluten free ones and they were in the buckwheat that I wanted to purchase. It would be so simple to separate the gluten grains/seeds from the gluten free ones. They showed me the bulk bag they bought the buckwheat in and it stated gluten free on the bag, but they contaminated it the minute they put it out. Who knows even if they use the same scoops etc. for all of the grains. This is why I will never buy from bulk bins.
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Me:
Celiac disease(positive blood work/biopsy- 10/2008), gluten free oat intolerent, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis/Disease, Raynaud's Disease


DS2(age 9):
celiac disease(positive IgA tTG, no biopsy- 11/2010)


DS1(age 13):
repeated negative bloodwork and negative EGD/biopsy. Started on a gluten free trial(8/2011). He has decided to stay gluten free due to all of the improvements he has experienced on the diet.


#8 MagpieWrites

 
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Posted 19 April 2010 - 07:44 AM

I've gotten sick eating Quaker oats (I know, I know, idiotic idea to sit down to a bowl! lol) but I DO eat Bob's certified gluten free Irish Oats and the rolled oats without any problems. Even went so far as to have a blind test with my husband (he was not thrilled with me doing it, but saw the value... or at least the value I put on knowing) to make sure I wasn't imagining an issue. (The first several months after being diagnosed it's easy to reach a point where every twinge/ache/stomach flutter "must be gluten" rather than simple things like: carsick, stressed, dealing with the inlaws.....)

Some folks CAN handle oats (certified gluten free) right off the bat, some seem to need a year or so to let their system heal, and some folks never will be able to eat them. (My poor nephew doesn't just have celiac - he's outright allergic to oats, rice and soy as well!)

Personally? I'm thrilled to pieces with the Bob's oats. I grew up eating oatmeal for breakfast almost every day and the first 6 months when I wasn't able to eat oats (couldn't find gluten free and my system was so wonky) were tough.
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#9 inmygenes

 
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Posted 20 April 2010 - 01:12 PM

That's interesting about the percentage that react to oats. I think I just have to be careful and not have them too often or in large amounts.

Yes it could be the outer coating on the quinoa that is irritating my stomach, thanks for the advice I'll make sure I rinse it better next time.
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#10 inmygenes

 
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Posted 20 April 2010 - 01:16 PM

It's an interesting flour too, very nutritious and I'd love to easily be able to get hold of some!
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#11 inmygenes

 
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Posted 20 April 2010 - 01:54 PM

Bulk bins are definitely best avoided. In one store when the manager asked if I wanted to get the gluten free flour I was buying from the bulk bin, as it was cheaper, I said it could be contaminated. He immediately asked if I have celiac disease and when I said I did, he said that it's best to get the gluten free packaged flour instead.
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#12 masterjen

 
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Posted 21 April 2010 - 05:43 PM

I've read that the molecular structure of oats is quite similar to that of wheat, and the small intestine of some celiacs will therefore react to even g.f. oats for this reason.
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#13 precious831

 
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Posted 05 May 2010 - 11:22 AM

There seem to be a lot of myths flying around and it's hard to know what to believe sometimes. Here are some of them:

QUINOA My natropath seemed to think quinoa contained some gluten. Actually it seems that quinoa is not even a grain but a seed related to leafy green vegetables like spinach. So it's totally gluten free, it makes me bloated, but maybe that's a contamination issue? Bobs Mill sell a gluten-free quinoa.

Millet I came across one website recently that was saying Millet contained gluten, another myth! Millet is a gluten free grain.

Oats Myth: oats are not gluten free. They contain no gluten it seems, as long as they are free from contamination, but they do contain a protein that is similar to gluten. I have eaten 'pure oats' and they definitely tend to upset my stomach if I eat too many, so I guess I'm sensitive to the protein they contain.

Have you come across other myths about gluten free grains? Do you eat oats and do you get a reaction from them?


Don't quote me but I heard that is typical for quinoa, I get gas too and so does my DD and I believe it's because it's high in fiber and also it has some coating to it that is supposed to cause GI distress. So I was told to soak it for a few hours and then rinse thouroughly before cooking. Before I would just rinse it til the water runs clear. Also it's weird, but I notice it all the time in my DD's stools, almost like she is not digesting it, she's 2 by the way.

About millet, one of my favorite flours, haven't had the grain by itself yet.

Oats, I can't tolerate, it's been a long time since I tried even gluten-free oats and I don't mind because I honestly can't stand oats and anything with oatmeal at all, lol. So I guess this worked for me.
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#14 sunnybabi1986

 
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Posted 13 May 2010 - 02:58 PM

We buy Ancient Harvest Quinoa and I LOVE LOVE LOVE it! :) We eat it all the time, it's nice because it's prerinsed, no rinsing required and I've never had a problem with it! Red quinoa is my favorite.

I've had gluten free oats a handful of times since going gluten free and haven't had a problem yet! (Cross my fingers) I use it mainly in Apple Crisp, so I'm not eating a lot of it at a time. I'll have to try a bowl of it sometime, though. Haven't worked up the nerve yet, hearing others' stories of getting sick from gluten-free oats. Would make for a great breakfast, though, if I can handle a whole bowl of it :)
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