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Blood Type Diet


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13 replies to this topic

#1 cdford

 
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Posted 22 May 2005 - 11:00 PM

I came across some info on this while researching this week. I had also been encouraged to try it by another friend. Are any of you familiar with the Blood Type Diet? What is involved and what is it supposed to accomplish?
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Donna
South Georgia
9 yrs gluten-free
...also DH, fibromyalgia, neuropathy, osteopenia, hypothyroid...

After almost 10 years, I am doing soooo much better!

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#2 bean

 
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Posted 23 May 2005 - 12:00 AM

The blood type diet was created after Dr. Peter D'Adamo researched past medical records and found that people with the same blood types often had the same physical problems. The diet is based on providing the necessary nutrients to people according to their blood type. If I remember correctly (I used to have this book - until someone stole it! :angry: ) -umm.. where was I?

Oh, blood type.. Okay his theory is that people with certain blood types should eat according to their evolutionary status. For example, people with blood type O should eat a paleolithic diet, as the type O blood was the what the original humans had. Types A, B, and AB evolved later and are capable of eating a more expanded diet. So, his diets for these other types are slightly different - with AB having the most variety to choose from because they are the most recent blood type to have evolved.

Some people think that he's onto something. I have a friend who swears by it. (I used to work in a health food store and so I've seen a lot of people who go on these diets.) To be perfectly honest, when I had the book it seemed like a cool theory, but I didn't think the evidence was persuasive enough to convince me to do it. (Not for more than a few days anyway ;)) But - I bought the book years ago, and have since found that a lot of the things were true for me (type O). Even though I really fought the meat-eating diet for a long, long time - and tried various grain based diets (vegetarian, vegan, and macrobiotic, for instance) - I have never felt as good as when I am eating a high protein (meat based) diet.

I'm even fighting this now :( I've been trying to exist with soy, quinoa, and other grains as staples but I feel like hell. I'm allergic to eggs and dairy so I'm unable to get any protein there. So... back to meat soon.

Anyway - my point is that (in my case) Dr. D'Adamo might have been onto something. But, his diets are *really* intricate and specific and I don't think that's necessary. I think the best idea is to pay attention to how your body feels when you eat certain foods - and then stick with the ones that make you feel good and have positive effects on your health. From what I've seen, there are basically three types of people: those who do well with high protein diets, those who do well with high carb diets, and those who do well with a variety. Figure out which one you are and then go from there.

Best wishes!
- Michelle :wub:
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#3 lovegrov

 
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Posted 23 May 2005 - 05:26 AM

Most people I know think it's bull. The thing that's convincing to some people is that EVERYBODY is going to find some part of it that applies to them. When they find that part they think, "Wow, this guy really nailed that." But they forget about all the parts that didn't work out so well.

richard
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#4 skbird

 
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Posted 23 May 2005 - 07:40 AM

I am not sure how I feel about this diet. I am type A and I got interested when I read the forbidden list and found a bunch of foods that I eat but always felt a little off after - like garbanzo beans, for example. So I did try that for a couple of months but felt no different in the long run - actually felt worse as it told me for my blood type I should be eating almost no meat and nearly all grains (though not wheat). The best thing about the diet was finding a great spelt bread recipe for my breadmachine - of course I can't eat that now. I guess I could thank the diet for helping me figure out that wheat was bad for me but that's about it.

Blood type doesn't dictate everything - for example it doesn't allow for genetic conditions or disease.

Stephanie
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Diagnosed by food challenge, 10/04
Gluten-free since 10/04
Gluten-sensitive genes: HLA-DQ 1,3 (Subtype 6,9)
Interstitial Cystitis, 7/07
Fibromyalgia, 6/11

#5 bean

 
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Posted 23 May 2005 - 08:30 AM

Blood type doesn't dictate everything - for example it doesn't allow for genetic conditions or disease.

Stephanie

Good call Stephanie! ;)

- Michelle
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#6 cdford

 
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Posted 23 May 2005 - 08:50 AM

Thanks for the input, guys. I had just been pointed toward this by multiple persons and wanted to get some feedback. Doesn't sound like I need to spend the money on the book since you gave a pretty good synopsis. I already know everything but my cholesterol does better on a high protein diet (I'm O). I just did not think of it in association with my blood type. I am not interested in a detailed dietary plan at this point. I'll just stick to my meats, veggies, and fruits since they seem to be working for me.
  • 0
Donna
South Georgia
9 yrs gluten-free
...also DH, fibromyalgia, neuropathy, osteopenia, hypothyroid...

After almost 10 years, I am doing soooo much better!

#7 jknnej

 
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Posted 23 May 2005 - 12:40 PM

I like the blood type diet but it is just impossible for me to maintain. When you have a crazy schedule sometimes you just need to eat, you know? It's hard enough to be gluten-free and then also have to worry about all of that.
Even with food allergies, I have heard you are supposed to stop ingesting those foods for awhile but can gradually let them back in, with the exception of gluten, of course.
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#8 gabrielle

 
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Posted 23 May 2005 - 05:35 PM

because i am studying nutrition to be a dietician i must put my 2 sense in. i think it's a bogus idea, because it does eliminate food groups. the only diet plan in my opinion is moderation.
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Gabrielle
Lancaster, Pennsylvania

#9 gf4life

 
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Posted 23 May 2005 - 05:48 PM

I personally felt great when I was on the blood type diet (and gluten-free by accident since I didn't have any of the alternate gluten grains). It was when I added in things like spelt that I found out about gluten and Celiac. But I agree that it is hard to follow. For me to feel my best I had to follow it EXACTLY. This was a big problem for me because I'm type A. Which is basically an almost vegetarian diet. You can eat chicken/turkey and certain kinds of fish, but only a couple servings a week. Your main protein is soy and bean/rice combos. I'm allergic to soy, and beans give me terrible gas, so I HAVE to eat meat a bit more often than is recommended. But I do feel best with a lower amount of daily protein than is recommended by the governments food pyramid. It is very limiting, especially when you add in being gluten-free...I have the books and occasionally think about doing a modified version. I certainly do seem to react negatively to most of the foods on my avoid list. I'm just not sure I could stick with it long term...

God bless,
Mariann
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~West Coast-Central California~

Mariann, gluten intolerant and mother of 3 gluten intolerant children

#10 lovegrov

 
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Posted 24 May 2005 - 05:53 AM

Maybe it's just me, but if I were following a diet that tells me my blood type says I should get most of my protein from soy and beans, but I'm allergic to soy and beans give me terrible gas, I'd have to wonder of there weren't something wrong with the basic concept of that diet.

richard
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#11 gf4life

 
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Posted 24 May 2005 - 11:04 AM

Good point richard! :huh: :D

I think it is like most fad diets where it doesn't fit everyone 100%. It certainly isn't a medical necessity like the gluten-free diet for a Celiac!

God bless,
Mariann
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~West Coast-Central California~

Mariann, gluten intolerant and mother of 3 gluten intolerant children

#12 Guest_BellyTimber_*

 
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Posted 29 May 2005 - 04:01 PM

:)

I haven't tried it but was intrigued. I felt the books badly written as they make a point but don't stress it enough, e.g there are at least hundreds of different blood types (that are discovered so far).

Do we know anyone that had the test for being an "excretor" (I forget what of)? Anyone know whether they have M or N?

(I haven't had and don't know)

I do expect we could tell what is good for us by listening to our bodies, like our group O friend above who gradually came to eat more meat and probably others who found the reverse was best for them.

I have type A but don't know the rest of the detail on my blood group so I can't look up my diet in these books. They gave me some ideas about food though. I enjoy nearly all simple foods (not wheat any more) but have had a gap of time away from much baking/cooking, must resume soon.

I think the highly specific lists are to do with lectins which I have seen mentioned elsewhere in connection with immmunity - as is the blood of course. As food is "foreign" the body has to respond to it somehow and the right balance has to be struck by the body.

The thing I'm sure is that we have a job to do, maintain our health gluten-free and if we've already got tools that enable us to do that, we don't need additional schemes.
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#13 gf4life

 
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Posted 29 May 2005 - 05:06 PM

I had the secretor test done. I'm an A+ secretor. I belive this means that I secrete my blood type into my bodily fluids (like saliva), and it alters your food lists a little bit. Non-secretors are at higher risk for certain diseases also. I didn't have any tests done to see if I an M or N. I don't remember if it was a test you could order through Dr. D'Adamo's site or not. Anyhow, it was starting to get a bit more complicated, the more books that came out. The first book I got was a very simple diet plan. Just basically general lists of foods that were really good for you, foods that were neutral and foods you should avoid. You were supposed to try to eat a variety of foods that were really good for you, and the rest of your general nutrition came from the neutral foods, and then you did your best to avoid the last group. No hassle. Then all this started coming up with all the other factors into the diet, like secretor status, MN status, etc. (I should never have gotten the Complete Blood Type Encyclopedia, but it was a gift from a friend!). and now I'm not sure I really want to devote much time to it...
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~West Coast-Central California~

Mariann, gluten intolerant and mother of 3 gluten intolerant children

#14 cdford

 
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Posted 29 May 2005 - 09:52 PM

Sounds like my long-time stance on dieting still makes much more sense:

Eat a wide variety of fruits and veggies, a little meat, and a little appropriate whole grains. A small amount of sweets or desserts won't hurt every now and then. All things in moderation.

This has been my dietary rule for years now and it has worked for the most part (we all have those stress or PMS moments when things get whacked in one direction or another).
  • 0
Donna
South Georgia
9 yrs gluten-free
...also DH, fibromyalgia, neuropathy, osteopenia, hypothyroid...

After almost 10 years, I am doing soooo much better!




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