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Vanilla Extract
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Hi everyone! So, I know that you have to check with manufacturers to see if their particular vanilla extract is gluten-free. But tonight I'm going out to dinner and having a dessert made with vanilla extract. It's made frm scratch at the restaurant. What exactly should I be asking the chef to make sure that it's gluten-free? Am I asking about which alcohol is used to make it? HELP!!!! :unsure: I want to eat a yummy dessert tonight!

Thanks :)

Kristy

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Kristy,

Did you mean that the chef makes the vanilla extract from scratch?

If the alcohol in the vanilla extract is grain derived, then it would give you problems unless it came from corn. So that would be your main question. (I'd want to know each ingredient.) If you meant that the dessert was made from scratch, but with purchased vanilla extract, then you might have to check on caramel coloring too, because I think that some brands include that, and it could be problematic. If the extract was store bought, then you could call ahead and ask the chef what brand of vanilla extract he/she uses? Then you can contact the company and check on it yourself. But I can tell you right now that all of McCormick flavor extracts are safe because they use synthetically derived alcohol.

Good luck; I hope you get to enjoy that dessert! :)

Paula

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If you call them and they use a kind that contains gluten then maybe you should see if they will make it with a kind of vanilla extract that you bring. McCormick is a good brand :D

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Hi,

I just wanted to add that I've been using a vanilla product from Frontier. Frontier has several "flavors" including vanilla that are made from real vanilla beans but are in a glycerin base. The "flavors" are alcohol free and have a thick, sweetness to them. I substitute the vanilla in all my recipes and it works great.

Hope you have a great time and find something that works!

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Thanks so mcuh everyone! I wound uo not going last night because I got really sick after lunch yesterday and I don't know why. I had gluten-free pasta with a gluten-free clam sauce by Pastene. I think I just can't break down the garlic in the clam sauce! Oh well, you win some, you lose some! I'm on a mission to have that dessert this week though! Yes, he maskes the vanilla extract from scratch so I'll ask if he uses a grain-based or caorn-based alcohol. But aren't all distilled alcohols safe anyhow?

Kris

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Any one know about the kroger Vanilla?

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Distilled alcohol made from wheat is gluten-free. It doesn't have to be made from corn.

I've looked and looked and have yet to find a vanilla or vanilla extract that isn't gluten-free.

Kroger's is gluten-free.

richard

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Ahhh, the distillation debate rages on! There will probably always be a group of us that does not feel comfortable using distilled alcohol or vinegar that is derived from grain other than corn.

Anyway, it occurred to me later that the chef is most likely using Vodka as the base for the vanilla extract. This is common among those who make their own because of its relatively bland flavor which doesn't compete with the taste of the ingredient that is being captured in the extract. And unless I'm mistaken, Vodka is made from potatoes.

Sorry I didn't think of this earlier.

Paula

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Most vodka is now made from grain. They bother me but I suspect that is due to my yeast intolerance for anything made with grain and regular yeast (I can drink tequilla and that has been fermented but doesn't bother me).

Potato vodka is more difficult to find and kind of expensive. I just found one in our little town but haven't tried it yet. I was very excited to see this post because I had fogotten that I bought the bottle and can use that to make my vanilla. Something my recipes have been missing!!!

So check with the chef to see if he is using potato or grain derived vodka. Also, if you can drink normal/grain vodka, then the vanilla he makes probably won't bother you...

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Vodka is made from many things, potatoes being one of the least common (and most expensive). Corn is fairly common.

I do know that some people don't believe that distilling renders wheat, rye or barley harmless. However, grain scientists who have studied it, ever major celiac organization in the U.S. and Canada (CSA still sort of waffles), and the national dietitian associations in the U.S. and Canada all agree it's safe, so I feel confident giving that advice.

richard

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McCormick told me all their extracts are gluten-free.

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I use Flavorganics vanilla extract, they clearly label gluten free... but I would think that you could easily make a vanilla extract from scratch and have it be gluten free, so I would just talk to the chef!

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Thanks again everyone! I'll write back after I try that dessert!

Kristy :)

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WOW---that is so good to know that all of McCormick's are gluten-free. I have been buying my vanilla at the health food store, some that is organic and labeled gluten-free. It is so expensive, thanks for the information. Isn't it great that we have such caring, sharing people for friends here on this board? THIS is what this board is supposed to be all about, not that sniping that has occured recently!!!!!!!!!

Barbara

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McCormick's policy is not to HIDE any gluten on the labels. Read the labels to make sure it is gluten free. I haven't found any McCormick spice I was interested in buying that had any gluten in the ingredients, yet.

I use Flavororganics vanilla too. I buy it in bulk from a co-op I joined. It has saved me a lot of time and money. The catalogue lists gluten free products and I can check on-line any of the food labels. www.unitedbuyingclubs.com

Laura

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Vodka is made from many things, potatoes being one of the least common (and most expensive). Corn is fairly common.

I do know that some people don't believe that distilling renders wheat, rye or barley harmless. However, grain scientists who have studied it, ever major celiac organization in the U.S. and Canada (CSA still sort of waffles), and the national dietitian associations in the U.S. and Canada all agree it's safe, so I feel confident giving that advice.

richard

I agree, Richard...I have never found any vanilla which was not gluten free. I am also extremely sensitive and if distilled grains made a Celiac sick, I would be sicker than ever by now. I am not sure why some have so much trouble finding the easy information out there. If you check reputable sources, there should be no problem.

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