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What's The Scoop On Maltodextrin?


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24 replies to this topic

#16 nora_n

 
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Posted 29 August 2010 - 02:10 AM

Maltodextrin is not made from malt, but from starch plus citric acid.

Just look it up in wikipedia.

Then look up citric acid.
It is made from mold.

I have high IgG antibodies to yeast and react to mold, also I react to traces of gluten. Citric acid may be derived from moldy wheat or any starch. Anyway, my butt hurts from some citric acid, and not so from others. Some citric acid is cleaner than others, some is made from citrus.

I do react to maltodextrin, but not always.

Nora
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gluten-free since may 06 after neg. biopsy symptoms went away and DH symptoms which I had since 03 got gradually better.
daughter officially diagnosed celiac and casein intolerant.
non-DQ2 or DQ8. Maybe DQ1? Updated: Yes, double DQ5
Hypothyroid since 2000, thyroxine first started to work well 06 on a low-carb and gluten-free diet
Lost 20 kg after going gluten-free and weighing 53 kg now. neg. biopsy for DH. Found out afterwards from this forum that it should have been taken during an outbreak but it was taken two weeks after. vitaminD was 57 nmol/l in may08)

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#17 nora_n

 
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Posted 29 August 2010 - 02:33 AM

I just checked the lovetoknow website someone linked to in this thread, and it is very inaccurate.
Maltodextrin is not naturally derived from barley (they assume it is made from malt, which is not true)
Gluten is not in other grains, like teff, as the name rules have changed several decades ago, and they perpetuate inaccuracies. What was formerly called gluten in the grains that are not wheat, barley, rye and oats, are called prolamines. Only the toxic prolamines are called gluten.

Who knows what else is inaccurate on that website.
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gluten-free since may 06 after neg. biopsy symptoms went away and DH symptoms which I had since 03 got gradually better.
daughter officially diagnosed celiac and casein intolerant.
non-DQ2 or DQ8. Maybe DQ1? Updated: Yes, double DQ5
Hypothyroid since 2000, thyroxine first started to work well 06 on a low-carb and gluten-free diet
Lost 20 kg after going gluten-free and weighing 53 kg now. neg. biopsy for DH. Found out afterwards from this forum that it should have been taken during an outbreak but it was taken two weeks after. vitaminD was 57 nmol/l in may08)

#18 lovegrov

 
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Posted 29 August 2010 - 05:03 PM

Both of those sites that Tidings posted are just flat-out wrong.

richard
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#19 Tidings

 
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Posted 30 August 2010 - 11:45 AM

To Richard and nora_n,

The post carrying those two links did not "recommend" or consider them either "right" or "flat-out wrong." My post was listing ingredients that I personally have negative reactions to, and was asking if anybody knew whether there might be a GLUTEN connection with any or some of them. Then the post said, "Found some links..." It is up to the reader to determine whether internet content rings with truth or seems wrong. (I myself am still in the research phase of many of these things.)

By the way, also found some items on my list of items that cause a HIGHLY ALLERGIC REACTION IN MYSELF discussed in "Dangerous Wheats," a book by Braly and Hoggan, including: Gelatin, Maltodextrin and Whey, which they listed under "Safe Sources and Ingredients in Flour, Caveat: Always double-check for risk of contamination)." They went on to list items that "may" contain gluten and acronyms that might spell HIDDEN GLUTEN, which included: HPP: HYDROLYZED VEG PROTEIN, MSG: MONOSODIUM GLUTAMATE, TVP: TEXTURED VEG PROTEIN.

Since I get the same terrible reactions to ALL the above ingredients listed in my initial post, I avoid them, whether the allergen is GLUTEN or GLUTAMATES or SOMETHING ELSE. Not everything is yet known about how these allergic reactions interact and how substances may be contaminated with or related to the protein(s) in gluten that cause such havoc for some of us. (It may simply be that Celiac disease causes damage that gets further exacerbated by other allergens, like whey, pectin, carrageenan, MSG, etc.) The best guide is to avoid what we recognize as a problem substance, which of course is not always easy to do when ingredients disguise themselves with names like "flavorings" and "seasonings," etc.
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#20 psawyer

 
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Posted 30 August 2010 - 12:20 PM

By the way, also found some items on my list of items that cause a HIGHLY ALLERGIC REACTION IN MYSELF discussed in "Dangerous Wheats," a book by Braly and Hoggan, including: Gelatin, Maltodextrin and Whey, which they listed under "Safe Sources and Ingredients in Flour, Caveat: Always double-check for risk of contamination)." They went on to list items that "may" contain gluten and acronyms that might spell HIDDEN GLUTEN, which included: HPP: HYDROLYZED VEG PROTEIN, MSG: MONOSODIUM GLUTAMATE, TVP: TEXTURED VEG PROTEIN.

That book was published in 2002, prior to the enactment of the Food Allergy Labelling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA). Prior to FALCPA taking effect on January 1, 2006, wheat could hide in many things, including "vegetable protein." That is not true today. Wheat (and soy) must be clearly and explicitly disclosed.
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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

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#21 Tidings

 
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Posted 30 August 2010 - 08:02 PM

That book was published in 2002, prior to the enactment of the Food Allergy Labelling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA). Prior to FALCPA taking effect on January 1, 2006, wheat could hide in many things, including "vegetable protein." That is not true today. Wheat (and soy) must be clearly and explicitly disclosed.


Hi Peter,

Thanks for the info. What is puzzling is how or why companies are still permitted to simply state "NATURAL FLAVORINGS" or "SPICES" and similar nondescript terms on their list of product ingredients. All too often, vague terms like "FLAVORINGS" or "SPICES" can really mean "MONOSODIUM GLUTAMATE" and MSG-derivatives, which can provoke serious allergic reactions for MANY people. Guess the FDA still has not taken MSG-allergy seriously...?

By the way, getting back to Maltodextrin, wikipedia defines it as:
"Maltodextrin is a short chained starch sugar, gelatin hybrid base, (dextrin), that is used as a food additive. It is produced also by enzymatic hydrolysis from gelatinated starch and is usually found as a creamy-white hygroscopic spraydried powder."

Anyone know WHAT STARCH they are using to create this "gelatinated starch" (hopefully it's corn starch, and not from a gluten-containing grain)? --And BTW, seeing the word GELATIN (also on my No-No list!) makes me start to understand why I react to Maltodextrin, whether it has gluten or not.

P.S. A partial answer to my question:
According to glutenfreeliving.com, "Maltodextrin is gluten free. It can be made from a variety of starches, including corn, potato, rice or wheat. However the source does not matter because maltodextrin is such a highly processed ingredient that the protein is removed, rendering it gluten free. If wheat is used to make maltodextrin, "wheat" will be [sic] appear on the label. Even in this case, the maltodextrin would be gluten free."
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Thanks to Sarah at personalizedcause.com for allowing me to adapt their beautiful green Celiac Awareness ribbon as my "avatar" graphic.

#22 nora_n

 
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Posted 31 August 2010 - 12:35 PM

Hi Tidings, I do react to glucose from wheat, even though it may test as gluten free, and maltodextrin, even though it is made from supposedly purified starch.
The swedes have tested glucose form wheat starch, and foudn various concentrations of gluten in it , down to no detection.

(maltodextrin is made from starch plus citric acid and I react to citric acid)

So I hear you and believe you.

Some of us react to citric acid, MSG, gelatin, etc.

Many celiacs here tolerate gluten-free wheat starch 50-200ppm, and a minority tolerate way below 20ppm, maybe under 1 ppm??
  • 0
gluten-free since may 06 after neg. biopsy symptoms went away and DH symptoms which I had since 03 got gradually better.
daughter officially diagnosed celiac and casein intolerant.
non-DQ2 or DQ8. Maybe DQ1? Updated: Yes, double DQ5
Hypothyroid since 2000, thyroxine first started to work well 06 on a low-carb and gluten-free diet
Lost 20 kg after going gluten-free and weighing 53 kg now. neg. biopsy for DH. Found out afterwards from this forum that it should have been taken during an outbreak but it was taken two weeks after. vitaminD was 57 nmol/l in may08)

#23 eric from montreal

 
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Posted 11 January 2013 - 08:14 PM

taszoo, I am not familiar with the label laws in OZ. But in Canada and the US, maltodextrin is definitely safe--if wheat is the source it must be explicitly declared on the label.

PSAWYER, according to the following website maltodextrin is not necessary safe: http://www.glutenfre...r/maltodextrin/ The labeling requirements appear more complex than what you mention.
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#24 nvsmom

 
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Posted 12 January 2013 - 04:30 PM

PSAWYER, according to the following website maltodextrin is not necessary safe: http://www.glutenfre...r/maltodextrin/ The labeling requirements appear more complex than what you mention.


I think what was meant here is that in the USA and Canada, maltodextrin will have wheat listed beside it if it is not safe.

I personally am in Canada, and maltodextrin always has corn or wheat listed with it if it came from one of those sources since our labelling laws changed in August.
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Nicole Posted Image

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

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Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

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#25 psawyer

 
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Posted 12 January 2013 - 05:49 PM

The Canadian Celiac Association, among other sources, lists maltodextrin as safe, without qualification as to origin. That is quite sufficient for me to consider it safe.

In Europe, maltodextrin is exempt from allergen disclosure, because it is so highly refined.

It is just not a concern, although some people try to make one out of it.
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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

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