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Freaking Out


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#1 ciliegia

 
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Posted 12 May 2010 - 11:03 AM

My doctor seems pretty sure that I have an intolerance to gluten. I am awaiting my test. But I am freaking out. I don't have the symptoms that I have read about here, but I having the beginning of osteoporosis because I seem not to be assimilating Vitamin D. I am a 59 year old female, I'm 5'3" and weigh 113 pounds. I am a "foodie" though I hate to even label myself that way. I'm basically a vegetarian and have been very many years. I eat fairly well (organic and cook from scratch) but I am a pastry addict. I don't eat a lot (or I would weigh more) but I lived in Europe, and I need to start my day with a cup of coffee and a cheese danish or an almond brioche from a french bakery in L.A. or a croissant with a cappuccino. The only time I ate really well, was when I was pregnant - I never drank any coffee. But the thought of giving up gluten would make me so miserable - I's probably turn into a blimp because nothing will satisfy my craving for starch. Has anybody else felt this depressed? I have great will power, but this seems beyond anything I can do. I have no stomach aches or pains. Maybe I'll get lucky and the test will be negative, but I know it probably won't. Will I at least be able to have an occasional treat, or is it all or nothing?
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#2 skigirlchar

 
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Posted 12 May 2010 - 12:21 PM

eveyone is different, but if you are positive for celiac then you will need to cut out the gluten

however, if you are like me, and it's a WHEAT issue, then if you cheat then you deal w/ the consequences but it's not as life threatening as if you had celiac

even if it IS ceilac, there are plenty of options out there to work with, especially since you say you are a foodie. just think of all the new flours and other items (think molecular gastronomy :D) that you will get to add to your cooking dossier.
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-severe soy, wheat & yeast allergies 2006
-penicillin allergy 2008
-multiple other food & environmental allergies starting 1982
-non-iron deficient anemia - life long
-migraines 3/07
-negative celiac blood testing 10/09 & upper endoscopy biopsy 3/10
-negative GERD observation during upper endoscopy 3/10
-positive hereditary hiatial hernia during upper endoscopy 3/10
+continually working on gluten-free/CF/SF related to allergies & celiac like symptoms
+continually working on elimination of caffine, chocolate, & spicy foods related to hernia & heartburn

#3 lucia

 
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Posted 12 May 2010 - 12:24 PM

My doctor seems pretty sure that I have an intolerance to gluten. I am awaiting my test. But I am freaking out. I don't have the symptoms that I have read about here, but I having the beginning of osteoporosis because I seem not to be assimilating Vitamin D. I am a 59 year old female, I'm 5'3" and weigh 113 pounds. I am a "foodie" though I hate to even label myself that way. I'm basically a vegetarian and have been very many years. I eat fairly well (organic and cook from scratch) but I am a pastry addict. I don't eat a lot (or I would weigh more) but I lived in Europe, and I need to start my day with a cup of coffee and a cheese danish or an almond brioche from a french bakery in L.A. or a croissant with a cappuccino. The only time I ate really well, was when I was pregnant - I never drank any coffee. But the thought of giving up gluten would make me so miserable - I's probably turn into a blimp because nothing will satisfy my craving for starch. Has anybody else felt this depressed? I have great will power, but this seems beyond anything I can do. I have no stomach aches or pains. Maybe I'll get lucky and the test will be negative, but I know it probably won't. Will I at least be able to have an occasional treat, or is it all or nothing?


I really, really, really like to eat too. To the extent that sometimes I think about meals I've eaten when I want to feel happy. I can describe dishes I ate years ago in detail. I know that not everybody is like that, and not everybody understands either.

Over a decade ago, I choose to make radical changes in my diet after being diagnosed with fibromyalgia. I was in pretty much constant pain, else I never would have gone through with it. I gave up coffee, white flour, white sugar, dairy (except for yogurt), and meat. Meat was the hardest (bacon, fried chicken, Brazilian barbecue ... umh ...). I've been a vegetarian now for over a decade, and it's great. I adjusted. I found other things I liked as much. I was able to ease up a little on my strict diet after I was well, but still basically stick to what I described here.

I was *really* depressed too when I realized gluten was making me sick. I felt really bad for myself. ("I already give up so much. Why this too?") I let myself eat ice-cream for the first time in a decade.

But, it's been 6~ weeks now, and I am adjusting. I'm determined to make some cashew burfa (an Indian desert) tonight. I've been eating lots of dried fruit for desert. I will say breakfast is the hardest. I'm glad there's gluten-free bread out there, even if the price is outrageous. Maybe, you could treat yourself for awhile to gluten-free croissants. I know they won't taste as good (at first), but it may help.

At least there's no gluten in cappuccino. Love those! Still sometimes have decaf cappuccinos, even though they're not as good.
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#4 Wolicki

 
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Posted 12 May 2010 - 01:46 PM

Really, it's not a death sentence. Take it from this life long foodie. Life revolved around food. I come from a long line of foodies. There was no bigger foodie than me. And I am not exxagerating.
So, it's been almost one year since diagnosis. And yes, the first few months were tough.
Now, I am a fairly good baker. With gluten free flours. I hated to bake before, but loved to cook. Now baking for my son gives me joy.
For me, food has become more about fuel, which I am really happy about. It really is a lot of work being a foodie.
You'll be ok. If you can't find the delicious things you love, you can learn to make them. You'll be just fine!
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Gluten free is not so bad! If you are new, hang it there, it gets easier!

#5 conniebky

 
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Posted 12 May 2010 - 04:26 PM

Hi -
I stopped eating gluten yesterday. Today on my way home, I started to swing into White Castle and then remembered that I can't have my White Castles any more. It made me sad, so I understand what you're saying.

I love to have a Canadian Mist and ginger ale while I watch American Idol (it's a tradition) or a beer, and I know I can't have the beer and I don't know about the bourbon. I've been thinking about all the things I love that I'll have to give up. Every morning for breakfast, I have a pack of Lipton Double Noodle Soup (that kind in a box) I've been having that for breakfast since I don't know when, so now I have no clue at all what I'm going to eat. I found out today I CAN eat Fritos and bean dip, another favorite of mine.

If I had to choose between MS and being on a different diet, I'll do the different diet. I tell myself, "go on and eat that, girl, that's on you....make yourself sick..." Actually, I'm so terrified and sick and tired of feeling like I have been, THAT'S the part I make myself think about.

I think the hardest part is going to be just getting used to it, not eating something out of habit and/or eating something you don't realize you shouldn't.

I really like this forum, the people are compassionate and knowledgeable. Hang tough, hon, ... and I will too ;)

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Be kind to each person that you meet, for everyone is fighting a great battle

#6 luvs2eat

 
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Posted 12 May 2010 - 04:47 PM

It takes a while, but you really do get to the place where you can either recreate whatever you want to eat w/ gluten free stuff... or you do w/out.

I keep saying ... in the scheme of things and the awful things that can happen to people ... not eating gluten is NOTHING. I just had to learn to cook differently.

But, like I said ... it takes a while.
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luvs2eat
Living in the beautiful Ozark mountains in Arkansas
positive blood tests and later, positive biopsy
diagnosed 8/5/02, gluten-free (after lots of mistakes!) since that day
Dairy free since July 2010 and NOT happy about it!!

#7 mushroom

 
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Posted 12 May 2010 - 04:50 PM

You can still have Redbridge and other gluten free beers while watching American Idol; each person has to find out for themselves whether they can handle distilled spirits - most can, but it is better to wait until you've healed a bit. The Redbridge beer is brewed using sorghum I believe. Looks like you will need to make your own rice noodle soup; a big pot in the fridge should last a while.

To both of you, the initial adjustment period is tough, but once you start equating gluten with rat poison it suddenly loses a lot of it's appeal :lol: (and for us it is the equivalent of rat poison). Pretty soon you will find out what wonderful things you can cook up gluten free - much better than the processed gluten free foods you find in the markets, and you will be proud of your newfound baking skills.
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

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Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
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Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
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#8 Skylark

 
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Posted 13 May 2010 - 02:36 PM

Maybe this will cheer you up. It's the blog of a French pastry chef who has family members with celiac disease and is constantly working on new gluten-free recipes. You absolutely do not have to give up baking! http://www.mytartelette.com/
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#9 AlysounRI

 
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Posted 13 May 2010 - 04:13 PM

Don't give up!!

If you really want a good reading experience to show just how damaging wheat is (to all living creatures too, not just humans!!) read a book called Healthier Without Wheat by Stephen Wangen.

There are other grains, seeds which can be made into grains, and you can bake and cook, you just can't do it on the fly anymore. You need to prepare ahead and just change your lifestyle a bit. Your resolve and reward for changing and sticking to the diet is more energy than you ever knew you could have to cook and bake all of those things that truly feed your body and mind and don't make you sick and sluggish.

Right now, I am baking up a very yummy gingerbread with buckwheat flour.
It should be done in about 5 minutes.
You can do this too if you so choose.

You will find that you always get your daily servings of fruits and veggies per day.
You will find that you really can be healthy and not be a slave to a pill or 4 every day.
It's not easy esp. in North America and Europe where things you can't have are all around you.
But your resolve to staying gluten free really does pay off!!
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Long history of IBS, and stomach/intestinal problems. Low on iron for all of my life.
Low on energy, with aches and pains in my joints and in my whole body for as long as I can remember.
Mostly lactose intolerant for all of my life (except for yoghurt)
Diagnosed in 2003 by naturapath as wheat intolerant. Tried it then fell of the wagon. In Feb. 2010 tried going gluten-free.
Went back to the poison in March, 2010.
Tested negative for celiac in April, 2010 (based on negative biopsy and normal tTG test). IgA tested 30-40 percent higher than normal.
Not going to fight the diagnosis because I refuse to go back to the poison. Happily gluten-free for health reasons as of April 2010, and not looking back.

#10 gf_soph

 
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Posted 13 May 2010 - 07:58 PM

I think that if you feel a massive craving for gluten, it may be because it isnt doing you any good. I know how hard it is to give up the gluten - I used to say that bread was my crack. I craved it like nothing else, not even coffee came close. I also used to work in a bakery!! My recommendation on giving up gluten would be to make a last chance list, and load up on the gluten the weekend before going gluten-free. I felt so sick after that it helped me through the next few weeks.

I find now that the smell of a lot of gluten products makes me feel somewhat ill, even toast and pizza which i loved. You also lose the exact taste of the gluten foods over time, so that comparisons with gluten-free products aren't such an issue. Also, these products are getting better and better. There are a lot of products that are actually nice! gluten-free baking is different, but with practice I'm sure you can make something that hits the spot.

As a foodie, you actually have a great head start as you are more likely to make the effort to create enjoyable gluten-free foods. There are gluten-free food blogs and masses of cookbooks. Although giving up the gluten may seem like the end of the world, it is a far better option than osteoporosis (and all the other problems assocaited with gluten). Also, some gluten symptoms can be hard to spot, so you have no idea how much better you may feel after giving up gluten :)
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#11 mommida

 
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Posted 14 May 2010 - 05:45 AM

I have become more of a "foodie" because of gluten free! :D
You can recreate foods that you loved. I recreated a four layer chocolate cake with alternating layers of chocolate and white chocolate mousse. Gluten eaters can't get enough of this cake. I can't go anywhere without people asking me to make it for them once they have tried it. :o Therefore I have named it the chocolate monster. The cake is super size, but I still end up making about 5 (that's right FIVE) different cakes for my kids' birthday parties because now I have a reputation for awesome cakes. (It is a large family too.)
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