Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

What Do I Need To Begin Gluten-Free Baking?
0

13 posts in this topic

I threw out my wheat flours, but now I need to replace them. I see lots of recipes online for gluten-free baking, but they all seem to use different flours. What should I purchase to start out? Where can I buy these? I appreciate advice from experienced bakers. Thanks so much!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

Gluten free baking is a real learning experience; a lot of trial and error, hopefully most trial :P I would recommend that you start out with some of the baking mixes, like Pamela's, Gluten Free Pantry, whatever strikes your fancy. Most people seem to start with Pamelas. That way you get used to the texture of gluten free batters (they are really not doughs) and how to handle them. As you experiment with mixes with different flours in them you will get to learn which kinds of flours you like and don't like. It is only after you have learned this that I would try with the individual flours. You will need some xanthan and/or guar gum although most mixes have this already added. A lot of recipes call for milk powder (if you do dairy). Many call for egg replacer which is good if you can't eat eggs :huh: but I always use eggs. The milk called for can usually be substituted for freely among the different milks available according to your tolerances. Enjoy Life makes gluten/soy free chocolate chips if that's what you need.

Pamelas Baking Mix should be readily available in a supermarket, as are a lot of the mixes for breads, cakes, cookies, pancakes. Health foods stores seem to have a more extensive collection and once you find what you like you can order in bulk quantities online. But start out slow.... or you will end up with a whole pantry full of flours you either don't like or won't know what to do with. Look on here for recommended recipes or use our old friend google and you will find lots of things to experiment with after you have learned the fundamentals. The Gluten Free Goddess has a good primer on flours and gluten free baking, and RiceGuy did a great rundown of all the gluten free flours on the forum here. I don't have the link right now but will try to find it.

But first of all, have fun. And don't cry:lol: if your first effort turns out like a brick. This is almost an initiation rite!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with everything mushroom said! :) I wish I would have started with mixes--then maybe I wouldn't have been so upset in the beginning! I, too, thought it was weird how everything I wanted to bake took three or four flours, but now it just seems normal to me. Probably the most common combination out there is rice flour, potato starch flour (be sure the word starch is in there--"potato flour" is not what you want to bake with!) and tapioca starch flour (the word starch may or may not be in the name, but it's the same thing). As mushroom said, as you taste more things, you'll learn what flavors you like (soy, for example, can be strong, as can the bean flours, and some people don't like that). There are many other great alternatives, such as sorghum and teff flour for changing it up a bit.

One key tip is that if you are going to bake bread (and I'd say for most gluten free baking, though I might be wrong), you really need a good quality stand mixer, if you don't already have one. My KitchenAid is my best friend! It really helped me out when I was getting started. My handheld mixer just couldn't handle the gluten free dough.

Happy Baking!

P.S. You can't go wrong with Pamela's Baking Mix, and the website has a lot of recipes and things you can make with it. Amazon usually has a good price, but it is for multiple packages.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ummmm.... did you also get yourself some new pans?

GOOD LUCK!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank-you both so much! I have no problem starting out with a mix, and Pamela's sounds like the gold standard. I already tried Pamela's chocolate chip cookies, and I loved them! But they come 9 to a box, and I'm sure you can all imagine the price. Time to bake my own!

I made up an apple-cobblery desert thing last week. I just mixed apples, cranberries, and gluten-free granola and added some butter. I was thinking that adding some flour would have been good too, but didn't have any anyway. Would an all-purpose flour like Pamela's work for this kind of thing?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




ummmm.... did you also get yourself some new pans?

GOOD LUCK!

skigirlchar: I need new pans for this too?!? I thought that I just needed to replace the cast iron ones?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep. It's a good idea to start with a few packet mixes to get your confidence up.

I started with packets of store-bought Gluten Free flour and with recipes that just called for gluten free flour. This worked just fine to start with.

Then I found a gluten-free baking book where the recipes called for different combinations of the same flours (white rice flour, tapioca flour, potato flour and soy flour) on a regular basis. This got me used to the idea of combining flours without having to buy every flour under the sun.

I have gradually built on this, finding new recipes and adding new flours and trying new combinations. Now I have a cupboard full of different kinds of flours and I use them all on a regular basis.

I suggest googling some recipes for gluten free flour mixes and buying the flours required to make your own mix. That way you can mix your own plain and self-raising gluten-free flour and have some of the commonly used flours in your cupboard so you can tackle some other recipes.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first attempt at gluten free cinnamon rolls was a disaster...or so I thought, the kids still ate them up. The 2nd attempt was much better. I really love the Pamela's chocolate cake mix. I also recommend that if you are baking for an occasion that you do a "practice run" before the real one. I picked up a Betty Crocker chocolate cake mix because I was at the regular grocery and needed one for a party. I was really dissapointed with it, Pamela's is much better. My daughter was diagnosed at the beginning of November and one of our family traditions is cinnamon rolls on Christmas morning. This was one of the first things she said - oh no I can't have cinnamon rolls on Christmas. At first I thought that was right, but then realized Pillsburry was not the only source for them. Then I realized that my home made gluten free ones were actually much better (once I got the recipe right). I am a newby, but basically what I did was try some recipes and just bought what that specific recipe called for. I slowly build up my pantry of gluten free necessities.

Good Luck and have fun!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gluten free baking is a real learning experience; a lot of trial and error, hopefully most trial tongue.gif I would recommend that you start out with some of the baking mixes, like Pamela's, Gluten Free Pantry, whatever strikes your fancy. Most people seem to start with Pamelas. That way you get used to the texture of gluten free batters (they are really not doughs) and how to handle them. As you experiment with mixes with different flours in them you will get to learn which kinds of flours you like and don't like. It is only after you have learned this that I would try with the individual flours.

But first of all, have fun. And don't cry:lol: if your first effort turns out like a brick. This is almost an initiation rite!

Yes, I agree with mushroom! It really is a lot of trial and error...and I've had a few errors, sometimes salvageable, sometimes not. I made a yellow cake from scratch and ended up not serving it to friends. But it's going to become crumbs as I need something to make a crumb crust for strawberry pie. tongue.gif

And then I baked a brick! mad.gif I ended up just throwing it out as I didn't even want to make bread crumbs out of it. But I will try the recipe again now that I have a new KitchenAid stand mixer.

The flours are overwhelming and I've probably bought a lot more than I should have but so many recipes call for different types. Eventually I'll be able to figure out what I really like and use. It's the one instance that it's probably good that they're packaged in small bags. lol

There are also some recipes for baking that don't use any flours like Flourless Chocolate Cake and I know I have a flourless peanut butter cookie recipe around here somewhere. Not to mention the Betty Crocker gluten free mixes, which are available everywhere. The brownies are a real winner (I added extra mini chocolate chips to them). And with General Mills coming out with new gluten free Bisquick soon, that'll make it a lot easier, too. biggrin.gif

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lucia:

If you do start to try baking from scratch, not from a premade mix, you will want to have two kind of flours on hand because they are used in a lot.

Potato starch (not potato flour)

and

Tapioca starch (used to make things a little lighter and fluffier)

Aside from that, some books ask you to use millet flour, amaranth, teff, corn starch, soy (ugh, though soy flour has an awful, awful taste, imo, and too many people have problems with soy!!), sorghum, garfava (combo of fava and garbanzo beans, which is actually really, really good), brown rice and whit3e rice flours, even sweet rice flour (mochiko). You can bake with nut flours too, like almond and chestnut, though these seem to be used most in cakes and sweet things. I bake with buckwheat flour too and I love that!!

People use all kinds of combinations.

A hint for getting cheaper flours: you can get sorghum (called jowar) and millet flour in Indian markets, in bigger bags for cheaper. You can get sweet rice flour in Asian markets for a lot cheaper too.

Also good to have on hand is cider vinegar. It's used in a lot of recipes.

Xantham gum and guar gums are necessary to have on hand.

Xanthan gum is pricey though you use it by the tsp. full not by the cup.

Happy baking.

I have now been making my gluten-free bread for about a month now. I use my bread machine and a regular loaf pan.

I have made some deeeeeeeeeelish loaves, so much so that I won't buy store bought gluten-free bread again!! I made a cottage cheese dill loaf (brown rice flour, tapioca starch, potato starch) that was amazing and goes so well as a sandwich made with cream cheese and smoked salmon!!

Happy baking!

~Allison

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a good idea to keep your flours in the fridge or freezer if you have the space. This extends their shelf life which can be an issue when you have a lot of different types of flours that you don't use often.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I threw out my wheat flours, but now I need to replace them. I see lots of recipes online for gluten-free baking, but they all seem to use different flours. What should I purchase to start out? Where can I buy these? I appreciate advice from experienced bakers. Thanks so much!

Thanks everyone! I bought a gluten free flour mix from Arrowroot. It has a recipe for bread on the back, so I guess I'll start with that.

Funny, my Mom started baking bread from scratch as a healthier alternative to supermarket breads when she was recovering from cancer. It is said that we all turn into our Moms.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Funny, my Mom started baking bread from scratch as a healthier alternative to supermarket breads when she was recovering from cancer. It is said that we all turn into our Moms.

Our Moms were right!!! biggrin.gif The number of preservatives and other unpronounceable ingredients in prepared foods should be enough to scare all of us.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      103,887
    • Total Posts
      919,486
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I'm actually scared to go to the doctor and could use some advice
      Hi Elle, The celiac testing process usually includes a blood test for gliaden antibodies first, and then an endoscopy to take biopsy samples of the small intestine to check for damage.  So while it's good to get the celiac panel done, don't go gluten-free until the whole testing process (including endoscopy) is completed. Vitamin deficits are a problem in celiac disease, so that issue does match up.  Anxiety and digestion problems are common too.  Celiac is tied to a few genes, so if your mom has it, you might have it also or might develop it at some point in life. Don't be too scared of it if it does turn out to be celiac disease.  The gluten-free diet can be a big change but the end result of it is you'll feel better.  You'll probably end up eating better more nutritious food than most people also. Celiac is a great disease in one way, because we know the trigger (gluten) and can treat ourselves with diet.  Most times doctors don't know the cause of autoimmune diseases and can't do anything but medicate the patient.  Our medicine is food.  Yum!  
    • Depression / anxiety issues
      You are welcome Chris.  The vitamin D council site linked below has info on how much vitamin D we need and how much sun is needed to get it, what foods contain it etc.  Around my neck of the woods I can only get UVB rays (needed to make Vitamin D in skin) from 10 am to 2 pm.  So a food source or vitamin pill is a good option,  Especially in winter when you probably won't get any V-D from sun exposure.  Foods sources are mackeral, salmon, tuna and a few plants like spinach and kale.  You can find a review of various V-D brands on the labdoor website.  Some pills are useless so it pays to verify you are taking a good one. http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/about-vitamin-d/ https://labdoor.com/rankings/vitamin-d  
    • Eeek confused! Positive biopsy, negative blood test???
      Sealy-yak - Can you confirm if they did the Full Celiac Panel? Some Celiac blood tests are more reliable than others.   
    • Eeek confused! Positive biopsy, negative blood test???
      the whole celiac/doctor issue is as frustrating as it is common, unfortunately   my gp, who knows full well that i have celiac, tried to give me this new 'miracle drug' for ibs-d when i told him i was still having indigestion/inflammation for seemingly no reason.  "it's expensive, but i have a coupon for the first month"  O BOY LUCKY ME!  i told him, ok, that i would try it.  (i think i have an idea of what my problem is and i originally asked for something different to try to see if it would work.  he didn't even know what it was)  i'm not gonna try it.  it's a narcotic, it has side effects i don't need or are the same as my symptoms.  i'm gonna switch doctors.  and switch doctors again and again until i find one that KNOWS MORE ABOUT THIS THAN ME.  on top of that, they computerized all their records, which i have been going there for 20 years, ASKING WHAT I'M ALLERGIC TO!  i said:   umm, don't you have that in my MEDICAL RECORDS??!!  well, we have your paper records.  i said, i'm HERE.  don't ya think ya shoulda pulled my file out??  i mean, y'all knew i was coming.  you know, the appointment thing....... LOLZ yeah, i've been gluten free for 6 years, and this clown tells me 'you know, you can't drink beer'  i said yes i can.  he says no, you can't.  i said why not?  because of the alcohol, haha?  no, because it has hops in it and if you're celiac, you can't have hops.  i said it's BARLEY.  O MY GOSH!!!!!!!!!!!!  i said, you're the doctor.  rolled my eyes and left. welcome to the board  sorry for all the yelling, lolz.  
    • Eeek confused! Positive biopsy, negative blood test???
      Thank you! My PA said that she still thinks it's celiac....but I don't feel like she's fully explained why. Some people are hard to get a solid answer out of! I think I'm gonna get a second opinion somewhere else.....appreciate the feedback. Makes me feel a little less crazy
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

    • Jmg  »  admin

      Hello Admin!
      I don't know whether this is of interest to post on your articles feed:
      http://pratt.duke.edu/about/news/window-guts-brain
      Kind Regards,
      Matt
      · 2 replies
    • celiac sharon  »  cyclinglady

      Hello cycling lady, have you noticed my picture is showing up as you?  Have no idea why but it's rather disconcerting to see my picture and your words 😉  Do you know how to fix it?  You seem to have far more experience with this board than I do
      · 1 reply
    • Larry Gessner  »  cyclinglady

      Hi There, I don't know if there is a place for videos in the forum. I just watched "The Truth About Gluten" I think it is a good video. I would like to share it somewhere but don't know where it should go. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
      Here is the link if you have never watched it.
      https://youtu.be/IU6jVEwpjnE Thank You,
      Larry
      · 2 replies
  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      60,929
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    Robyn08
    Joined