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Shrimp Curry - What Flour To Use?


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8 replies to this topic

#1 sa1937

 
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Posted 28 May 2010 - 04:46 AM

I have an old recipe for Shrimp Curry that calls for making a roux using butter, onion, curry powder and flour. I'm puzzled as to which type of flour would work best. I've pretty much eliminated consideration of corn starch, tapioca flour and anything that would make this a clear sauce and I question whether an all-purpose gluten free flour would work well.

Any suggestions?
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Sylvia
Positive Celiac Blood Panel - Dec., 2009
Endoscopy with Positive Biopsy - April 9, 2010
Gluten Free - April 9, 2010

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#2 AlysounRI

 
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Posted 28 May 2010 - 04:57 AM

I have an old recipe for Shrimp Curry that calls for making a roux using butter, onion, curry powder and flour. I'm puzzled as to which type of flour would work best. I've pretty much eliminated consideration of corn starch, tapioca flour and anything that would make this a clear sauce and I question whether an all-purpose gluten free flour would work well.

Any suggestions?


Arrowroot is often a substitute for corn starch.
Perhaps that one?
But wait, it's a "clear flour".

Perhaps you could use a bean four like garfava or even just chick pea flour?
Chick pea flour makes a great thickener.
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Long history of IBS, and stomach/intestinal problems. Low on iron for all of my life.
Low on energy, with aches and pains in my joints and in my whole body for as long as I can remember.
Mostly lactose intolerant for all of my life (except for yoghurt)
Diagnosed in 2003 by naturapath as wheat intolerant. Tried it then fell of the wagon. In Feb. 2010 tried going gluten-free.
Went back to the poison in March, 2010.
Tested negative for celiac in April, 2010 (based on negative biopsy and normal tTG test). IgA tested 30-40 percent higher than normal.
Not going to fight the diagnosis because I refuse to go back to the poison. Happily gluten-free for health reasons as of April 2010, and not looking back.

#3 sa1937

 
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Posted 28 May 2010 - 05:30 AM

Perhaps you could use a bean four like garfava or even just chick pea flour?
Chick pea flour makes a great thickener.

Allison, I have chick pea (i.e. garbanzo bean) flour and didn't even think of it. Do you think it would make it taste "beany"? And would I use the same amount of it as regular ol' wheat flour?
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Sylvia
Positive Celiac Blood Panel - Dec., 2009
Endoscopy with Positive Biopsy - April 9, 2010
Gluten Free - April 9, 2010

#4 AlysounRI

 
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Posted 28 May 2010 - 06:39 AM

Allison, I have chick pea (i.e. garbanzo bean) flour and didn't even think of it. Do you think it would make it taste "beany"? And would I use the same amount of it as regular ol' wheat flour?


Chick pea flour does have a taste, but it has less of a taste than garfava flour :)
I am not sure of how much you should use or if it would make your roux taste too beany.
However, if you are also using curry powder, that is strong enough to mask any overly beany taste from the chick peas ... perhaps. I haven't done anything like that so I can't say for sure. I just though it could be a possibility.

Chick pea flour is often used to thicken yoghurt sauces in Indian cooking but that is highly spiced cooking anyway.

I would wait for some other responses before you used my idea and let others weigh in, too.
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Long history of IBS, and stomach/intestinal problems. Low on iron for all of my life.
Low on energy, with aches and pains in my joints and in my whole body for as long as I can remember.
Mostly lactose intolerant for all of my life (except for yoghurt)
Diagnosed in 2003 by naturapath as wheat intolerant. Tried it then fell of the wagon. In Feb. 2010 tried going gluten-free.
Went back to the poison in March, 2010.
Tested negative for celiac in April, 2010 (based on negative biopsy and normal tTG test). IgA tested 30-40 percent higher than normal.
Not going to fight the diagnosis because I refuse to go back to the poison. Happily gluten-free for health reasons as of April 2010, and not looking back.

#5 MagpieWrites

 
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Posted 28 May 2010 - 07:10 AM

For myself, whenever I need to make a roux - be it for gravy, sauces, or the like - I tend to just use an equal amount of sweet rice flour in place of the wheat flour. No beany flavor (I'm a bit picky I'll confess. I'll happily eat beans in a thousand different permutations... but I can't stand most bean flours. To me, they tend to overwhelm everything else in the dish - or worse, MUTE every other flavor in the dish!), no grit, and it even will take on a lovely toasty flavor if you are going for a darker roux.

One caveat though - I can't swear to how it works with shellfish (allergic to the bugs of da sea :P ) BUT I have made chicken curry and chicken gumbo using sweet rice flour.
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Diagnosed with celiac in the summer of 09 - after being sick since I was a teen with no answers. I miss "real" pasta - but its a fair trade off for getting my life BACK.

#6 Skylark

 
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Posted 28 May 2010 - 09:10 AM

I use potato starch for thickening.
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#7 sa1937

 
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Posted 28 May 2010 - 02:59 PM

I think you're all on to something so thank you! I just found this recipe for Thick, Rich Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free Roux/White Sauce: http://www.recipezaa...te-Sauce-134473 It uses a combination of rice flour, garbanzo bean flour and potato starch.

If it works, it could be made up in small batches and used for curry sauce. I do have glutinous rice (sweet rice) flour and would probably substitute it for the regular white rice flour. I see a local store does have the Asian white rice flour, which I think is finer but I already have the other kind on hand so next time I'll go there to replenish my supply. I'm sure I could vary the amounts of the flours, perhaps cutting back on the garbanzo bean and adding in more of one of the others.

My recipe for the sauce for Shrimp Curry sauce can also be used for Chicken Curry. I'm sure the recipe is not an "authentic" Indian recipe as it is from a 50-year old Betty Crocker cookbook but my kids always loved it (still do) and now I need to make it gluten free.
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Sylvia
Positive Celiac Blood Panel - Dec., 2009
Endoscopy with Positive Biopsy - April 9, 2010
Gluten Free - April 9, 2010

#8 munchkinette

 
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Posted 31 May 2010 - 08:19 PM

What is shrimp curry made from? We've been looking for gluten-free shrimp paste for a long time. Most of the traditional southeast Asian kinds have wheat flour in them.
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Gluten free since Feb 2006, Dairy and Soy free since 2009

Anemic off and on since 2003
Negative tTG Ab, IgA, Gliadin Ab IgA, wheat allergy (IgE) blood tests (Feb 2006)
Positive wheat allergy skin test(Apr 2006)and dietary response (Feb 2006)
Celiac grandmother (Dx in 1940s, "grew out of it")

Training for my first triathlon to support the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America.

~Amy

#9 sa1937

 
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Posted 01 June 2010 - 04:58 AM

What is shrimp curry made from? We've been looking for gluten-free shrimp paste for a long time. Most of the traditional southeast Asian kinds have wheat flour in them.

Here's my recipe...as I said, there's probably not an authentic Indian thing about it. I've never heard of nor have I seen shrimp paste before.

Shrimp Curry (or Chicken Curry)

3 tbsp butter
1/4 cup minced onion
1-1/2 tsp curry powder (I use McCormick's)
3 tbsp flour (I now need to try a good gluten free flour blend)
1/2 tsp salt
3/4 tsp sugar
1/8 tsp ground ginger

1 cup chicken broth
1 cup milk
2 cups cooked shrimp (or substitute cooked chicken)
1/2 tsp lemon juce

Melt butter in heavy saucepan. Saute onion and curry powder in melted butter. Blend in flour and seasonings. Cook over low heat until mixture is smooth and bubbly (sometimes I have to add a bit more butter). Remove from heat. Stir in chicken broth and milk. Bring to boil, stirring constantly. Boil one minute. Add shrimp or chicken and lemon juice. Heat. Serve with rice and if desired, sprinkle condiments over the top.

Suggested condiments: Chutney, sieved hard-cooked eggs, tomato wedges, crisp bacon bits, raisins, sweet or sour pickles, slivered salted almonds, currant jelly, chopped salted peanuts, flaked coconut, sauteed onion rings, India relish, pineapple chunks or sliced avocado.


Note:
I use at least a pound of decent sized shrimp. I've also substituted Herb-Ox instant chicken bouillon if I don't have chicken broth on hand. If you want it hotter, use more curry powder. I do have some hot ginger curry powder but haven't tried it yet but then I'd leave out the ground ginger in the recipe. I think this recipe is something to play around with to suit your taste.

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Sylvia
Positive Celiac Blood Panel - Dec., 2009
Endoscopy with Positive Biopsy - April 9, 2010
Gluten Free - April 9, 2010




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