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Completely Grain Free
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Has anyone else gone completely grain free. (No corn or rice) The main reason I tried it was for weight loss. I'm finding it difficult to know what to eat for meals that is different. If you have any ideas, please let me know. This also means to corn syrup or corn starch.

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Has anyone else gone completely grain free. (No corn or rice) The main reason I tried it was for weight loss. I'm finding it difficult to know what to eat for meals that is different. If you have any ideas, please let me know. This also means to corn syrup or corn starch.

The reason I haven't done it, Lori, is that I couldn't imagine how I could do it :o You can't eat too many fruits, I get easily bored with vegetables, and too much meat (and I am I great meat eater) just puts me off. Without the carbs I am lost :rolleyes:

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I have been thinking that I would do the same thing, so I am definitely going to keep an eye on this thread to see what people suggest.

One thing I thought of while I have been trying to plan a strategy for how to eat without any grains is occasionally making brownies without any flours for those day when I may feel like caving. I came up with a recipe that substitutes ground flax and ground nuts for the flour and I think it tastes really good and it's loaded with healthy stuff, like fiber and protein.

Anyway, I'm sure that there are many recipes out there that would work, but if anyone want the recipe I have I would be happy to post it.

~Sarah

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I was able to eat grain-free using the Specific Carbohydrate Diet. I find this diet satisfying - my staple foods were vegetables, winter squash, meats and poultry and found a source of organic, gluten-free goat's milk yogurt. There is a recepie book available. Using this diet I have been able to add back some small amounts of grains, mostly rice but sometimes millet and sprouted quinona. I have had a great improvement by treating intestinal Candida which I didn't realize were causing some digestion problems by using Candida Herbs and Neem.

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I went completely grain free for 3 weeks in January. It's how I discovered I had a problem with gluten - when I got lazy and started eating wheat again I felt absolutely horrendous.

I found it hard to get enough carbs. I was following paleo so no legumes or potatoes either. I was doing it to lose weight, because I've found with my insulin resistance low carb is the only way to go. I have trouble with eating grains in moderation so no grains seemed easier than some grains, and it really was, I wasn't getting hungry. However, dropping my carbs so much left me feeling quite spaced out at times and even though I felt fantastic 99% of the time, I ran out of energy very quickly when exercising. I train with someone and I know what it's like to be pushed harder than I feel up to, but this was like completely hitting the wall, I couldn't have kept moving for anything. I think the problem was that I wasn't eating enough at dinner time (I train in the morning before breakfast).

Ultimately, it required a lot more planning and I'm not a creative cook and that's where I gave up. My doctor would like me to go grain free and dairy free, but I've decided to start by going gluten free and use that as my base point. I'll never go back to the gluten grains, but I'm not going to be so tough on myself as to cut out everything at once. Later I'll cut down the others bit by bit. Meanwhile, I'm determined to eat as natural as I can and get my grain carbs from things like brown rice and quinoa. I can't imagine eating as much of them as I did of wheat, they don't come in half as many exciting forms, nor are they available everywhere like wheat was.

Maybe try giving up all processed grains and and see how you go?

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I have been thinking that I would do the same thing, so I am definitely going to keep an eye on this thread to see what people suggest.

One thing I thought of while I have been trying to plan a strategy for how to eat without any grains is occasionally making brownies without any flours for those day when I may feel like caving. I came up with a recipe that substitutes ground flax and ground nuts for the flour and I think it tastes really good and it's loaded with healthy stuff, like fiber and protein.

Anyway, I'm sure that there are many recipes out there that would work, but if anyone want the recipe I have I would be happy to post it.

~Sarah

Please share recipe!

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The reason I haven't done it, Lori, is that I couldn't imagine how I could do it :o You can't eat too many fruits, I get easily bored with vegetables, and too much meat (and I am I great meat eater) just puts me off. Without the carbs I am lost :rolleyes:

I eat as many fruits as I want and I do eat potatoes a couple of times a week and I still am losing a pound or two a week.

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I went completely grain free for 3 weeks in January. It's how I discovered I had a problem with gluten - when I got lazy and started eating wheat again I felt absolutely horrendous.

I found it hard to get enough carbs. I was following paleo so no legumes or potatoes either. I was doing it to lose weight, because I've found with my insulin resistance low carb is the only way to go. I have trouble with eating grains in moderation so no grains seemed easier than some grains, and it really was, I wasn't getting hungry. However, dropping my carbs so much left me feeling quite spaced out at times and even though I felt fantastic 99% of the time, I ran out of energy very quickly when exercising. I train with someone and I know what it's like to be pushed harder than I feel up to, but this was like completely hitting the wall, I couldn't have kept moving for anything. I think the problem was that I wasn't eating enough at dinner time (I train in the morning before breakfast).

Ultimately, it required a lot more planning and I'm not a creative cook and that's where I gave up. My doctor would like me to go grain free and dairy free, but I've decided to start by going gluten free and use that as my base point. I'll never go back to the gluten grains, but I'm not going to be so tough on myself as to cut out everything at once. Later I'll cut down the others bit by bit. Meanwhile, I'm determined to eat as natural as I can and get my grain carbs from things like brown rice and quinoa. I can't imagine eating as much of them as I did of wheat, they don't come in half as many exciting forms, nor are they available everywhere like wheat was.

Maybe try giving up all processed grains and and see how you go?

I found a great website www.(Company Name Removed - They Spammed This Forum and are Banned). All grains contain gluten, they just don't all have gliadin in them. Dr. Osborne and others believe that all gluten causes problems if you have gluten sensitivity, not just gliadin. It is a really interesting website, watch his videos. The first ones I watched were the ones about the effect of gluten on children. (not really just children) It completely made my mind up to go gluten free. I really believe all of the processed gluten free crap I was eating was poisoning me and sabotaging my weight loss efforts.

Good Luck,

Lori

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Ps- I'm starting grain free as of today. Eek. We shall see how this goes!

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I'm finding it difficult to know what to eat for meals that is different. If you have any ideas, please let me know.

I like to use different herbs and spices in my dinner meals, maybe thicken a stew with arrowroot instead of corn starch. I like to vary how I cook meals too; sometimes slow-cooking soups and stews, other times broiling shrimp or steak and eating it with a really big salad. Try preparing vegetables that are from another culture, like jicama, jerusalem artichokes or burdock root. I like jicama sliced into matchstick sized wedges in a salad, burdock root in a stew.

There's a way of pairing meat with a fruit/vegetable that aids in digestion; Pork is better digested when you eat it with apple, beef with mushrooms, chicken with lemon, turkey with cranberry, lamb with mint or rosemary, salmon with dill... for every meat there is a complementary acid, and these flavors together are very satisfying.

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i am mostly grain free & losely follow the paleo diet. just look up paleo diet recipes and you'll get loads off the internet, or get the book from your local library. i'm an athlete and train for 2+ hours everyday and haven't had problems getting enough carbs. although i do drink p90x recovery drink after each workout. this drink may not work for everyone because it contains whey protein, but is gluten free.

i only eat meat, veggies, fruit, eggs, nuts & oils, but "cheat" on gluten free bread about 2x per week (1 slice only), and sometimes i might have a very small bowl of beans or rice (1 x per week). it may seem boring to only eat these foods everyday, but i haven't had an issue.

you can make curries, stir-frys, basic meat & veggie dishes, quiches, casserole bakes, etc.. you just need to be a little more creative & use back to "basics" ingredients. this also eliminates most issues with cross-contamination!!

this is a very lean fat plan, so you have to make a point to throw fat on your food, like flaxseed, walnut or olive oils! you can eat as MUCH as you want and as often as you want. i eat 6 meals per day.

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I eat grain-free. Canned pumpkin suprizingly doesn't spike the blood sugar and is low-carb. I warm it up in the microwave for breakfast. You can add you fat of choice, olive oil, coconut oil, butter or substitute and "milk" of choice-coconut milk, almond milk or cow's milk and spice like cinnamon. Sprinkle some flax meal, crushed nuts or seeds on top. I used to make a "granola" with crushed almonds, coconut flakes, pumkin seeds etc.

If you get into baking with almond meal I recommend this supplier http://lucyskitchenshop.com/flour.html. I used another brand at first but being free of all grains and processed products I could see that I was reacting to CC. It went away when I switched to Lucy's which is a dedicated gluten-free supplier.

I found the almond meal recipe I tried easier and more successful than the usual gluten-free baked goods. The texture was great. There are flax meal recipes out there too-add the words lowcarb diabetes recipes to your searches and you may come up with some great alternatives.

Here are some more links with almond meal recipes.

http://www.comfybelly.com/2009/04/thin-crust-pizza.html#more

http://www.elanaspantry.com/tag/bread/

This one has some very tasty recipes:

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/shepherds-pie/

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Please share recipe!

Brownies: Gluten Free and Flour Free

2/3 C. butter or coconut oil

1 12oz. package semi-sweet chocolate chips

1 1/2 C. sugar (you can cut down the sugar to half depending on what you like)

1/3 C. flax seed - ground

2/3 C. ground almonds or coconut flour (I have also used cashews and pecans with good results)

1/3 C. unsweetened cocoa powder

1/2 tsp. baking powder

1/2 tsp. salt

1/4 tsp. xanthan gum

1 tsp. vanilla extract

3 eggs

Heat oven to 350 degrees.

Grease 9x13 pan.

In sauce pan melt the butter and 1 cup of chocolate chips just until melted.

In separate bowl combine all dry ingredient (sugar,grd flax, grd almonds, cocoa, baking powder, salt, xanthan gum)

Beat eggs. Add the eggs and vanilla to the (cooled) choc chip and butter mixture and mix well. Add this to the dry mixture and mix until well blended.

Add the rest of the chocolate chips if desired, and spread in pan.

Bake for approximately 25 - 30 minutes, or until the middle is set.

Depending on what you want you can make these as sweet or low sugar as you want. I have sometimes used agave nectar instead of sugar and it makes them come out a little more like a dense cake.

Other variations:

Add 1 Tbsp orange extract for chocolate orange brownies.

Add 2 tsp. peppermint extract for choc. mint brownies.

Whatever sounds good to you: dried cranberries and chopped nuts, white choc chips etc...

Hope you enjoy and let me know what you think!

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I like to use different herbs and spices in my dinner meals, maybe thicken a stew with arrowroot instead of corn starch. I like to vary how I cook meals too; sometimes slow-cooking soups and stews, other times broiling shrimp or steak and eating it with a really big salad. Try preparing vegetables that are from another culture, like jicama, jerusalem artichokes or burdock root. I like jicama sliced into matchstick sized wedges in a salad, burdock root in a stew.

There's a way of pairing meat with a fruit/vegetable that aids in digestion; Pork is better digested when you eat it with apple, beef with mushrooms, chicken with lemon, turkey with cranberry, lamb with mint or rosemary, salmon with dill... for every meat there is a complementary acid, and these flavors together are very satisfying.

Interesting with meat pairing. I eat a lot of those very combinations...yum Thanks never thought of that possibility!

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i am mostly grain free & losely follow the paleo diet. just look up paleo diet recipes and you'll get loads off the internet, or get the book from your local library. i'm an athlete and train for 2+ hours everyday and haven't had problems getting enough carbs. although i do drink p90x recovery drink after each workout. this drink may not work for everyone because it contains whey protein, but is gluten free.

i only eat meat, veggies, fruit, eggs, nuts & oils, but "cheat" on gluten free bread about 2x per week (1 slice only), and sometimes i might have a very small bowl of beans or rice (1 x per week). it may seem boring to only eat these foods everyday, but i haven't had an issue.

you can make curries, stir-frys, basic meat & veggie dishes, quiches, casserole bakes, etc.. you just need to be a little more creative & use back to "basics" ingredients. this also eliminates most issues with cross-contamination!!

this is a very lean fat plan, so you have to make a point to throw fat on your food, like flaxseed, walnut or olive oils! you can eat as MUCH as you want and as often as you want. i eat 6 meals per day.

Can you give me some casserole recipe or ideas? sure would appreciate it!

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(I have also used cashews and pecans with good results)

Well that answers ONE big worry for me! I've looked at tons of recipes for gluten-free cooking and so many sing the praises of almond or coconut flour as a great replacement - which is great for many, but when you are allergic to BOTH, well. Not so good. I'd been wondering if I could use cashews, but could never find anyone who knew one way or the other. Thanks so much!

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Well that answers ONE big worry for me! I've looked at tons of recipes for gluten-free cooking and so many sing the praises of almond or coconut flour as a great replacement - which is great for many, but when you are allergic to BOTH, well. Not so good. I'd been wondering if I could use cashews, but could never find anyone who knew one way or the other. Thanks so much!

I'm glad that helped you out a bit. I actually really liked the cashew and pecan variation - I think they are my favorite pick, but unfortunately I can't have nuts right now. I'm hoping that I will be able to add them back in after a while.

Oh, and by the way, I just use a coffee grinder to grind my flax and nuts. It works great and is much cheaper than buying them pre-ground.

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All grains contain gluten, they just don't all have gliadin in them.

Huh? Where did you find this? Just curious, as this is not what I have learned. There are lots of grains that do not contain any gluten. :)

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Huh? Where did you find this? Just curious, as this is not what I have learned. There are lots of grains that do not contain any gluten. :)

This is a question of language and semantics.

The word "gluten," to a chemist, means the protein of a grain (any grain). All grains contain protein. You may occasionally see "corn gluten" as an ingredient. There is a gluten in rice, as well.

To a dietitian, and to a celiac, the word "gluten" refers only to the proteins of three specific grains: wheat, rye and barley (in Canada, for food labeling purposes, oats are also considered "gluten"). This sense is also that generally understood by the public.

In discussions on this board, unless the context clearly indicates the first sense, you should assume that references to gluten are using the second sense.

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This is a question of language and semantics.

The word "gluten," to a chemist, means the protein of a grain (any grain). All grains contain protein. You may occasionally see "corn gluten" as an ingredient. There is a gluten in rice, as well.

To a dietitian, and to a celiac, the word "gluten" refers only to the proteins of three specific grains: wheat, rye and barley (in Canada, for food labeling purposes, oats are also considered "gluten"). This sense is also that generally understood by the public.

In discussions on this board, unless the context clearly indicates the first sense, you should assume that references to gluten are using the second sense.

Ahhh, I understand. Thanks for clarifying! :)

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Thank you!

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Huh? Where did you find this? Just curious, as this is not what I have learned. There are lots of grains that do not contain any gluten. :)

The website I found is www.(Company Name Removed - They Spammed This Forum and are Banned). There are many videos. There are also books that I have read, but I don't remember the names of them. The books I read said there is gluten in all grains, just not gliadin and their way of thinking is that gliadin is the problem. There is so much info out there and you really have to sort through it all and decide for yourself what you believe. My theory is if you're eating gluten free and still not feeling well, it's worth a try! :)

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I eliminated all grains for one month (I also cut all carbs--no potatoes, no sugar except a small amount of honey and no dairy) when I was trying to figure out what was making me sick. Most of my meals were pretty boring--steamed vegetables and grilled meat. Two of my sources for recipes were Mark's Daily Apple (listed in a previous post) and Doug Kaufmann's Phase one diet recipes. Kaufmann has some recipes posted on his site: http://knowthecause.com/WatchTheShow/PhaseOneDining/tabid/61/articleType/CategoryView/categoryId/162/Holiday-Recipes.aspx He also has a recipe book you can order.

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