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How Cigarette Smoke Helps Celiacs


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9 replies to this topic

#1 Candy

 
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Posted 02 June 2010 - 12:41 PM

I'm not a smoker but I sometimes crave a cigarette at least twice a month and that being only since I had seemed to develop Celiac Disease in my late twenties.
I did test positive for Celiac genes at Enterolab a few years back.
I remember reading on this site an article that said Celiacs benefit from cigarette smoke but the article didn't say WHY. And that's what I want to know --How does cigarette smoke help Celiacs? Is the nicotine helpful to Celiacs and how ?

Here is the Article-My link

If nicotine is beneficial to Celiacs they could use a nicotine patch which delivers 4mg of nicotine or electronic cigarettes.

Personally I could use a little nicotine :)
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I have DNA ancestry in NW.EUROPE,where CELIAC'S known to be common.

DEC. '05 TESTED POSITIVE for the Celiac GENES HLA-DQ2 , and DQ3 SUBTYPE DQ8
Celiac Negative Endoscopy-Aug.'08 - Diagnosed with Hernia and GERD(Gastric Esophageal Reflux Disease),and prescribed Acid Reducing Medication. I hadn't eaten WHEAT for a year prior to the Endoscopy-maybe that's why result was Negative. I need TTG test to determine Active Celiac Status/

Disgnosed with Sjogren's 9/19/2008- Internist referred me to Eye Doctor and Rheumatologist.

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#2 WheatChef

 
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Posted 02 June 2010 - 02:22 PM

Technically the article doesn't say anything about nicotine, for all they know it could be the tar that has this effect.
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Receiving a qualified diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome is as useful as a Psychiatrist giving you a diagnosis of "Doesn't Think Right".

#3 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 03 June 2010 - 04:25 AM

Please, please, please don't start smoking or use a patch etc. The addiction is so not worth it. Even if it seems to delay the gut symptoms other systems can be effected. I had DH and ataxia since childhood and started smoking at age 11, perhaps it did delay the GI symptoms but for me that was not a good thing. The damage done to my brain and joints was severe before gut symptoms became anything more than an annoyance. It may have delayed my diagnosis for a long time. I do so wish I did have the GI symptoms as a teen or child, perhaps I would have been diagnosed then if they had been present instead of having my brain attacked for another 30+ years first.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#4 Mari

 
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Posted 04 June 2010 - 04:29 PM

I read a similar study several years ago. In that study the researchers found that 30% of Celiacs were 'hard core' smokers - more than 5 cigarettes a day. I think they concluded that smoking was in some way beneficial to Celiacs.

Tobacco is used as a dewormer in horses and there is one alternative PhD researcher who had a theory that all autoimmune diseases are caused by the presence in the body of specific parasites and specific pollutants/toxins. In searching through her books I found 2 cases where she had treated 2 people, an infant and a young child with gluten problems by killing parasites and removing the pollutants. There was not enough information to draw any conclusions but it is interesting. I think at best that this type of treatment could reduce the risk of celiac disease but would not 'cure' the disease once the autoimmune reaction was triggered tho killing off the parasites a person carries and doing detoxification programs leaves a person healthier.
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DQ6/DQ8
HLA-DQ B allele 1 *0602: HLA-DQ B allele 2 *0302
Gluten free and Cow Dairy free since 2006

#5 mushroom

 
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Posted 04 June 2010 - 05:20 PM

Smoking held symptoms at bay for me until I quit at 29. Used to be able to eat anything until then - but suddenly, BINGO, problems all over the place :o
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

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#6 heathen

 
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Posted 04 June 2010 - 05:24 PM

Regardless of anything nicotine might do to help our tummies, cigarettes are ALWAYS a bad idea. Multiple forms of cancer, heart disease, vascular disease, strokes, COPD... NOT WORTH IT!!! The only PROVEN treatment for Celiac disease is adherence to a gluten free diet.
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Diagnosed Celiac in February 2006
Villus blunting and positive blood test

#7 mushroom

 
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Posted 04 June 2010 - 06:24 PM

Regardless of anything nicotine might do to help our tummies, cigarettes are ALWAYS a bad idea. Multiple forms of cancer, heart disease, vascular disease, strokes, COPD... NOT WORTH IT!!! The only PROVEN treatment for Celiac disease is adherence to a gluten free diet.


I certainly was not advocating smoking!!! :o I quit because I have COPD....:(
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#8 jerseyangel

 
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Posted 04 June 2010 - 07:37 PM

I will never go back to smoking, and it might be a coincidence, but the 6 years I smoked was the only symptom free period in my life.
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Patti


"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

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"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

#9 Pac

 
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Posted 05 June 2010 - 09:12 AM

When I was eating gluten, I always said I must have been a smoker in my previous life. I used to crave cigarettes like crazy even though I never smoked because cigarette smoke gave me really bad asthma attacks. Now on gluten-free diet both the cravings and asthma are gone. B)


Tobacco is used as a dewormer in horses and there is one alternative PhD researcher who had a theory that all autoimmune diseases are caused by the presence in the body of specific parasites and specific pollutants/toxins. In searching through her books I found 2 cases where she had treated 2 people, an infant and a young child with gluten problems by killing parasites and removing the pollutants. There was not enough information to draw any conclusions but it is interesting. I think at best that this type of treatment could reduce the risk of celiac disease but would not 'cure' the disease once the autoimmune reaction was triggered tho killing off the parasites a person carries and doing detoxification programs leaves a person healthier.


That's interesting because I've read the right opposite about the gut worms/gut diseases interaction. Population dewormed on regural basis suffer more from diseases like Crohn's, colitis, celiac etc. than populations with higher incidence of diseases caused by gut parasites. The authors even successfuly treated patients by implanting worms into their intestines. They proposed that lack of gut worms might negatively affect composition of gut microbiota, with plays a big role in developing autoimmune diseases. IMHO, we've had these worms in our guts long before we became Homo sapiens, so how can we be so sure that our new habbit of 'preventive' deworming isn't actually more harmful than good?
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#10 Yoshi

 
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Posted 05 June 2010 - 09:30 PM

That's very interesting about cigarettes/nicotine. I was diagnosed with Crohns disease and type 2 Diabetes before I quit smoking. I had very few flareups with the Crohns and got my blood sugar down with diet and a minimum of medication and was able to go off the medication after a year. I quit smoking 8 years ago this month. Almost right away, the Crohns symptoms got worse. I was on one medication after another to try to ease the symptoms. Then I had to have surgery because my gall bladder ruptured, and I also ended up having to go on insulin to control my blood sugar. For awhile after the surgery, I had only minor digestive problems, but then they started up again, worse than ever. I struggled through it for over 3 years, before being diagnosed in February with gluten intolerance. I went gluten free immediately. My Crohns has improved and so have the other digestive issues. They're still there and flareup, just not as often or as bad. The only thing that still continues to be a problem is my blood sugar, which is very hard to control, even though I watch my carbs, exercise and take my insulin.
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