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Why Won't My Gluten-Free Bread Rise?
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I think I've tried about 6 recipes and had no success with gluten-free bread. It never rises. I bought new yeast because I thought mine must have been too old, but that didn't help. I've made gluten-free bread successfully many times, so I'm not a total amateur.

I made bread from the Bob's Red Mill mixes (both kinds) and I didn't have any problem with the rising, but I discovered that my stomach can't tolerate bean flours, so I can't use those mixes.

Does anyone have advice on gluten free bread making? I don't eat dairy so lots of recipes I find online are not possible for me to use, because they use milk powder (I've never seen the dairy-free versions even in the health food store). I don't think the lack of dairy is the issue (I'm subbing rice milk for cow's milk) because I did that with the Bob's Red Mill mixes as well.

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I think I've tried about 6 recipes and had no success with gluten-free bread. It never rises. I bought new yeast because I thought mine must have been too old, but that didn't help. I've made gluten-free bread successfully many times, so I'm not a total amateur.

I made bread from the Bob's Red Mill mixes (both kinds) and I didn't have any problem with the rising, but I discovered that my stomach can't tolerate bean flours, so I can't use those mixes.

Does anyone have advice on gluten free bread making? I don't eat dairy so lots of recipes I find online are not possible for me to use, because they use milk powder (I've never seen the dairy-free versions even in the health food store). I don't think the lack of dairy is the issue (I'm subbing rice milk for cow's milk) because I did that with the Bob's Red Mill mixes as well.

What is the tempertur on the liquid you add?

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Some mixes have xanthan gum already added, while others do not. You'll need to add it and/or other binder to get it to rise properly. However, I've found that some brands of xanthan are more effective than others, and thus you need to use less of it. Otherwise it can actually make the dough to stiff to rise. Adding the right amount of water is also important, and can be a bit tricky. I always add less than I know it will need, mix well, and gradually add more, mixing after each addition, until the dough is of the right consistency. You'll know if you used too much water if it falls after baking, or is too moist/gummy inside.

When you set the dough to rise, how much time do you allow, and what temperature do you keep it at? Also, are you covering the pan with plastic wrap or foil during the rising?

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What is the tempertur on the liquid you add?

Usually room temperature. Should it be warmer?

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Some mixes have xanthan gum already added, while others do not. You'll need to add it and/or other binder to get it to rise properly. However, I've found that some brands of xanthan are more effective than others, and thus you need to use less of it. Otherwise it can actually make the dough to stiff to rise. Adding the right amount of water is also important, and can be a bit tricky. I always add less than I know it will need, mix well, and gradually add more, mixing after each addition, until the dough is of the right consistency. You'll know if you used too much water if it falls after baking, or is too moist/gummy inside.

When you set the dough to rise, how much time do you allow, and what temperature do you keep it at? Also, are you covering the pan with plastic wrap or foil during the rising?

The recipes I've tried all have xanthan gum. The mixes came with it in, and the other recipes had it as an ingredient. Maybe my xanthan gum is "stronger" and that's why the mixes with it already added worked better. I'll experiment with less.

I have had loaves that fall after baking and are gummy inside. My latest attempt actually was a good texture as far as not being too soggy etc, and it didn't fall. It just didn't rise very much. So maybe less xanthan gum is the trick.

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I warm my liquid to 110 degrees and make sure the other ingredients aren't too cold. I usually add the yeast to the warm liquid(or part of it) and let it sit for 10 min. The yeast gets a head start that way and should seem active. You can add some of the sugar too to give it food. I cover the pan with the dough in it with a light dish towel-nothing tight, so that it has room to rise. Sometimes I turn the oven on to the lowest setting just for a few min. then turn it off and put the towel covered loaf in. Gives it a nice warm place to rise. At room temp some days it can take quite a while to rise-up to two hours it seems even if the house doesn't seem that cold.

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I think I've tried about 6 recipes and had no success with gluten-free bread. It never rises. I bought new yeast because I thought mine must have been too old, but that didn't help. I've made gluten-free bread successfully many times, so I'm not a total amateur.

I made bread from the Bob's Red Mill mixes (both kinds) and I didn't have any problem with the rising, but I discovered that my stomach can't tolerate bean flours, so I can't use those mixes.

Does anyone have advice on gluten free bread making? I don't eat dairy so lots of recipes I find online are not possible for me to use, because they use milk powder (I've never seen the dairy-free versions even in the health food store). I don't think the lack of dairy is the issue (I'm subbing rice milk for cow's milk) because I did that with the Bob's Red Mill mixes as well.

You could try letting it rise in a warmed oven. Set the oven to 200F and then once at that temperature put your bread in and turn the oven off, leave it to rise for 40 minutes and then without opening the oven turn it up to the baking temperature. I find this works well.

Getting the proportionate amounts of starch and flour is key. If there is higher fiber, heavier flour and not enough starch it won't rise. Also try reducing the liquid a little. Sometimes if I am using a whole grain flour I'll add an extra tsp of yeast and that helps it to rise.

Are you using live yeast and proofing it? - without that it might not rise.

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When all else failed, one of our poster bakers added some baking powder to her recipe and let it rise for a shorter time, and it turned out perfectly. Google "buckwheat bread"

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