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As Promised, A Few Recipes


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#91 Long2Play

 
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Posted 12 June 2006 - 06:41 PM

Thank you for your recipes! Time to get cooking! :)
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#92 jenvan

 
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Posted 13 June 2006 - 04:25 AM

seed, just the grain itself. what's fun about it, is that it goes a bit 'creamy' because of it's size/starch ratio. for those of us who are CF, it gives you a bit of that cheesy flavor/texture without the dairy. I hadn't anticipated it when I threw together the recipe (I just wanted a smaller binding grain), but it was a pleasant surprise! :-) the sweet italian sausage (usually not my favorite flavor) was *really* a winner in this recipe.

Tiffany--
I figured it was just the grain, so that is what I used that night. It was really great! I ended up cooking mine for about an hour. The flavor and texture was really good...dh loved it and my dad asked me to make him a big batch and freeze it for him for later :) I used italian chicken sausage...favorite in our house. Thanks!
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~~~~~~~
Jen
Indianapolis, IN

gluten-free since Feb 2005
dairy-free

#93 tarnalberry

 
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Posted 24 June 2006 - 10:00 AM

Beef Jerky (The Original Recipe)

1 London Broil
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup worchester sauce
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 teaspoon chili powder
1 teaspoon liquid smoke
1 teaspoon seasoned salt
optional - 1 teaspon crushed chili flakes or 1/2 tsp cayanne pepper

1. Slice meat approx 1/4" thick across grain.
2. Combine all maranade ingrediants, place in a dish, and cover
3. Place in refrigerator for 24 to 48 hours
4. Stir whenever you think about it
5. Place meat on oven rack
6. Set the oven to ~125-150F (warm setting on electric oven), keeping the door slightly open (you can use a folded up paper towl to prop the door open)
7. Leave in the oven for 3-6 hours or until meat is dry (check occasionally - time varies significantly depending on humidity and your oven).

Note 1: I don't yet know the best way of doing this in a gas oven - theoretically, it's the same, but I haven't tried it, having grown up with electric ovens, and only aquiring a gas oven after having aquired a dehydrator, which you could use instead of an oven, at an appropriately high setting.

Note 2: Don't substitute a different type of meat - well, don't substitute a non-red meat. Buffalo or venison would be fine, though drier, but chicken or turkey would need to be cooked lightly first to be safe since the internal temperature needs to get higher but it dries out more quickly, and fish is just *very* tricky to do and I don't suggest it without more specific fish instructions.
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Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy
G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004
Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me
Bellevue, WA

#94 lindalee

 
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Posted 24 June 2006 - 05:21 PM

Beef Jerky (The Original Recipe)

1 London Broil
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup worchester sauce
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 teaspoon chili powder
1 teaspoon liquid smoke
1 teaspoon seasoned salt
optional - 1 teaspon crushed chili flakes or 1/2 tsp cayanne pepper

1. Slice meat approx 1/4" thick across grain.
2. Combine all maranade ingrediants, place in a dish, and cover
3. Place in refrigerator for 24 to 48 hours
4. Stir whenever you think about it
5. Place meat on oven rack
6. Set the oven to ~125-150F (warm setting on electric oven), keeping the door slightly open (you can use a folded up paper towl to prop the door open)
7. Leave in the oven for 3-6 hours or until meat is dry (check occasionally - time varies significantly depending on humidity and your oven).

Note 1: I don't yet know the best way of doing this in a gas oven - theoretically, it's the same, but I haven't tried it, having grown up with electric ovens, and only aquiring a gas oven after having aquired a dehydrator, which you could use instead of an oven, at an appropriately high setting.

Note 2: Don't substitute a different type of meat - well, don't substitute a non-red meat. Buffalo or venison would be fine, though drier, but chicken or turkey would need to be cooked lightly first to be safe since the internal temperature needs to get higher but it dries out more quickly, and fish is just *very* tricky to do and I don't suggest it without more specific fish instructions.

Tiffany, Thank you - I am going to make this and the other recipes also sound really good. What would the jerky taste like it I left off the liquid smoke? I bought a bottle ages ago and didn't like it but if you feel I need it in this, I'll get another bottle and try it again. Thanks a lot. LindaLee
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Lee

#95 tarnalberry

 
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Posted 24 June 2006 - 06:42 PM

Tiffany, Thank you - I am going to make this and the other recipes also sound really good. What would the jerky taste like it I left off the liquid smoke? I bought a bottle ages ago and didn't like it but if you feel I need it in this, I'll get another bottle and try it again. Thanks a lot. LindaLee


I think it makes a big difference, but there are a lot of ways to make beef jerky, and this is just the only recipe I have written down. ;-) You can certainly try leaving it out. You can even try sweeter varieties by adding some brown sugar or honey, or make teriyaki sauce to use in place of the soy sauce.

Most beef jerky does have liquid smoke in it, as it does add a bit of something quite classic to the jerky, but that's the beauty of making it yourself - you can change that! :-)
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Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy
G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004
Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me
Bellevue, WA

#96 lindalee

 
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Posted 24 June 2006 - 06:52 PM

I think it makes a big difference, but there are a lot of ways to make beef jerky, and this is just the only recipe I have written down. ;-) You can certainly try leaving it out. You can even try sweeter varieties by adding some brown sugar or honey, or make teriyaki sauce to use in place of the soy sauce.

Most beef jerky does have liquid smoke in it, as it does add a bit of something quite classic to the jerky, but that's the beauty of making it yourself - you can change that! :-)

I am going to make it with the smoke. It needs to stay refrigerated, right? I have the soy and wh. sauce, any special brand of spices? I guess the plain ones are all gluten-free? Thanks again. I have just been cooking so plain until I'm sure everything is gluten-free.
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Lee

#97 tarnalberry

 
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Posted 24 June 2006 - 06:56 PM

I am going to make it with the smoke. It needs to stay refrigerated, right? I have the soy and wh. sauce, any special brand of spices? I guess the plain ones are all gluten-free? Thanks again. I have just been cooking so plain until I'm sure everything is gluten-free.


I use McCormick's or Spice Hunter, but that's just my preference. The liquid smoke I've always gotten (and is gluten-free - haven't seen one that isn't) doesn't need to be refrigerated, but I haven't made jerky in a while... :-)

Cooking gluten-free, even from safe foods, doesn't have to be plain, you just need pleny of fresh foods. A stir fry with lots of fresh vegetables and a bit of oil doesn't need fancy sauces/spices - it can be fabulous just by having fresh, varied vegetables. :-)
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Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy
G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004
Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me
Bellevue, WA

#98 tarnalberry

 
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Posted 25 June 2006 - 09:43 PM

Very Veggie Lasagna

Ingredients
-----------
2 boxes Tinkyada lasagna noodles
6 roma tomatoes
3 cans tomato sauce
1 bunch spinach
3 medium zucchini
2 small carrots
1 red bell pepper
8 oz mushrooms

1 tsp salt
2 tbsp fresh sage
2 tbsp fresh rosemary
3 tbsp fresh basil
1 tbsp fresh oregano
1 tbsp fresh thyme
5 cloves garlic
2-4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

Directions
----------
0. Preheat the oven to 350F.
1. Boil a large pot of water, blanch the tomatoes for 30 seconds, cool in a cold water bath, and peel.
2. Chop the roma tomatoes into small cubes.
3. Chop the fresh herbs finely and crush the garlic.
4. Combine the tomato sauce, tomatoes, salt, herbs, garlic, and olive oil in a wide pan and simmer until it's reduced and thicked a fair bit, approximately 20 minutes.
5. While the sauce thickens, thinnly slice (on the bias) the zucchini and the carrots.
6. Thinnly slice the mushrooms and bell pepper.
7. Wash the spinach and remove long stems.
8. In a very large pot, boil a large quantity of water, and add the noodles, boiling for approximately 3 minutes. Remove from the water and drain.
9. In a 9x13 baking dish, place a small amount of the tomato sauce, then a layer of noodles (should take about five across). Then layer the spinach on top of the noodles.
10. Add another layer of noodles, and more sauce on top of that. Spread the mushrooms evenly over the noodles.
11. Add another layer of noodles, and more sauce on top of that. Spread the carrots and bell pepper evenly over the noodles.
12. Add another layer of noodles, and more sauce on top of that. Spread the zucchini over evenly over the noodles.
13. And the final layer of noodles, and the rest of the sauce (at least approximately 1 cup), to cover the noodles.
14. Bake at 350F for 40 minutes. Check at 25min and cover with aluminum foil if necessary (if it's starting to burn a bit on the top).

Note: If canned tomato sauce is a problem (say, due to a problem with the citric acid), you can simply eliminate the tomato sauce, and use approximately 30-40 roma tomatoes (following the same blanching and chopping process), though it will take longer to cook them down (at least an hour).
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Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy
G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004
Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me
Bellevue, WA

#99 mouse

 
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Posted 28 June 2006 - 02:25 AM

Thanks Tiffany. My printer has been working overtime on this thread. Since I can't have soy, can I substitute Bragg's for soy? I really love jerky and have lots in the pantry that hubby gets to eat now.
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"Throw yourself a pity-party and you'll be the only guest." - Earlene Fowler

Diag. Celiac Disease by positive blood test 2/03/2004
Allergies - corn, soy, casein, egg whites and wheat
Morphia Scleroderma
Osteoarthritis
Hypothyroid and Hperthyroid
Essential Tremors
Asthma
Migraines
Fibromyalgia - diag. in 1978 when they called it Fibrositis
PAD Peripheral Artery Disease
Angina and Atrial Fibrillation
Gluten Ataxia
Vitiligo
Scoliosis of the spine (caused by malabsorption and it is horribly painful) This would be enough reason for someone to go gluten free.
Ocular Myastenia Gravis

#100 tarnalberry

 
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Posted 28 June 2006 - 06:42 AM

Thanks Tiffany. My printer has been working overtime on this thread. Since I can't have soy, can I substitute Bragg's for soy? I really love jerky and have lots in the pantry that hubby gets to eat now.


Bragg's amino acids are still made from soy though. I mean, if you can tolerate Bragg's, yeah, use them, they'll work fine in stir-fries, but they're soy-based.

You can make stir fries and leave out the soy sauce, focusing on other spices (I'll use chili sauce and lemon juice, for instance) to make soy-less stir fries. Maybe a bit of rice vinegar as well.
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Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy
G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004
Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me
Bellevue, WA

#101 jerseyangel

 
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Posted 28 June 2006 - 06:53 AM

Armetta--Someone posted this a while ago and I copied it down but have not tried it. It's for a soy sauce substitute--

2 cups beef broth
2 teaspoons cider vinegar
1 teaaspoon molassas
1/8 teaspoon ground ginger
dashes of pepper, onion powder and garlic powder

Combine all ingredients in saucepan. Boil (gently) uncovered until reduced to 1/2 cup. Store in fridge.

Another thing I do for stir fries is to throw in a small can of unsweetened crushed pineapple with the juice--that give you some liquid to work off of.
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Patti


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#102 mouse

 
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Posted 28 June 2006 - 08:11 AM

Thanks Tiffany and Patti. Someone suggested the Bragg's and hubby bought some when he went to the HF store for me. More money down the drain. I printed the recipe out Patti. And no I am not going to use the Bragg's. I am REALLY going totally soy, dairy and corn free.

Patti, how long can it be refrigerated?

I just read the label "made from hearty soybeans".
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"Throw yourself a pity-party and you'll be the only guest." - Earlene Fowler

Diag. Celiac Disease by positive blood test 2/03/2004
Allergies - corn, soy, casein, egg whites and wheat
Morphia Scleroderma
Osteoarthritis
Hypothyroid and Hperthyroid
Essential Tremors
Asthma
Migraines
Fibromyalgia - diag. in 1978 when they called it Fibrositis
PAD Peripheral Artery Disease
Angina and Atrial Fibrillation
Gluten Ataxia
Vitiligo
Scoliosis of the spine (caused by malabsorption and it is horribly painful) This would be enough reason for someone to go gluten free.
Ocular Myastenia Gravis

#103 lindalee

 
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Posted 28 June 2006 - 08:39 AM

Armetta--Someone posted this a while ago and I copied it down but have not tried it. It's for a soy sauce substitute--

2 cups beef broth
2 teaspoons cider vinegar
1 teaaspoon molassas
1/8 teaspoon ground ginger
dashes of pepper, onion powder and garlic powder

Combine all ingredients in saucepan. Boil (gently) uncovered until reduced to 1/2 cup. Store in fridge.

Another thing I do for stir fries is to throw in a small can of unsweetened crushed pineapple with the juice--that give you some liquid to work off of.

This is a definite keeper if its good!!! LL
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Lee

#104 kabowman

 
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Posted 28 June 2006 - 09:19 AM

That is the alternate soy sauce recipe that I used - it worked really well - even my soy sauce loving hubby loved this. We actually went a little crazy for about 2 weeks with this recipe!!!

Tiffany, can you post your regular pasta sauce too? Or, is it the same as your lasagna sauce...thanks.
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-Kate
gluten-free since July 2004

Other Intolerances:
Strawberries and Banannas (2007)
Nitrates (April 2006)
Yeast (which includes all vinegar so no condiments) (Oct. 2004)
Peanuts (Nov. 2004)
Soy (Oct. 2004)
Almonds (Sept. 2004)
Corn (Sept. 2004)
Lactose/Casein (1999)

#105 tarnalberry

 
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Posted 28 June 2006 - 09:39 AM

Tiffany, can you post your regular pasta sauce too? Or, is it the same as your lasagna sauce...thanks.


'regular' pasta sauce?! hehehe... all these recipes aren't recipes that I cook from, they come from me making something from whatever's in the kitchen (or in my brain), and saying "oh, that turned out well, I'll post the ingredients I used". so I really don't have a 'regular' pasta sauce. I have, like... five, or six, or seven fairly standard 'ideas' I'll put together depending on how much time I have and what flavor I'm looking for and who I'm cooking for and what time of year it is.

can you give me a better idea what you're looking for?

just a plain vegetarian tomato sauce for putting over a long pasta? in that case, I'd use something like this (with or without that much garlic), but not cooked down quite as thick.

a tomato sauce for putting over shaped noodles being served as it's own meal for vegetarians? then also something like this, but not cooked down quite as much, but with added veggies (likely the vegetables put in the lasagna, and onions).

a tomato based sauce for a full meal for a hungry non-vegetarian crowd? ditto above, but with ground turkey. I thought I had this somewhere in the list - you might check the first page, it's got a directory listing of all but the last few recipes.

if it's the middle of tomato season, however, I go all scratch, and cook from fresh tomatoes, and then go pretty much tomato, garlic, fresh basil, and salt.
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Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy
G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004
Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me
Bellevue, WA




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