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Entero Lab Question


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26 replies to this topic

#1 siglfritsch

 
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Posted 13 June 2010 - 07:35 AM

I'm assuming the Entero lab testing is for the celiac gene. If it comes back negative does that mean a person definitely does not have celiac but just gluten intolerance? How much does the testing cost and how is it done?
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#2 psawyer

 
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Posted 13 June 2010 - 07:49 AM

While I am not familiar with the specifics, EnteroLab offers multiples tests, only one of which is genetic.
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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

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#3 burdee

 
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Posted 13 June 2010 - 08:09 AM

I'm assuming the Entero lab testing is for the celiac gene. If it comes back negative does that mean a person definitely does not have celiac but just gluten intolerance? How much does the testing cost and how is it done?


See http://www.enterolab.com for info about their test prices. The gene test is a mouth swab kit which you do yourself and send back. The other tests are stool tests for gluten antibodies, casein antibodies, Ttg antibodies, malabsorption, soy antibodies, egg antibodies and yeast antibodies. All test for IgA antibody mediated reactions. I received my results in 3-4 weeks. You can also call or email E-lab with any questions you have. They are very helpful.

SUE
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Gluten, dairy, soy, egg, cane sugar, vanilla and nutmeg free. Enterolab diagnosed gluten/casein intolerant 7/04; soy intolerant 8/07. ELISA test diagnosed egg/cane sugar IgG allergies 8/06; vanilla/nutmeg 8/06. 2006-10 diagnosed by DNA Microbial stool tests and successfully treated: Klebsiella, Enterobacter Cloaecae, Cryptosporidia, Candida, C-diff, Achromobacter, H. Pylori and Dientamoeba Fragilis. 6/10 Heidelberg capsule test diagnosed hypochloridia. Vitamin D deficiency, hypothyroiditis, hypochloridia and low white blood cells caused vulnerability to infections. I now take Betaine HCl, probiotics, Vitamin D and T3 thyroid supplement to maintain immunity.


#4 Skylark

 
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Posted 13 June 2010 - 08:12 AM

Second post in this thread has my professional opinion of Enterolab.
http://www.celiac.co...sting-validity/

As for genetic testing, there are occasionally biopsy-positive celiacs without DQ2 or DQ8 but it's uncommon. Positive genetic results don't mean much, as 30% of the population is DQ2 or DQ8, yet only an estimated 1-2% are celiac.
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#5 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 13 June 2010 - 10:22 AM

I'm assuming the Entero lab testing is for the celiac gene. If it comes back negative does that mean a person definitely does not have celiac but just gluten intolerance? How much does the testing cost and how is it done?


Enterolab tests for more than just the 2 generally accepted celiac associated genes. They also test for antibodies in the stool for gluten, casien, egg, soy and yeast as well as testing for fat malabsorption.
While some are skeptical of their testing I found them to be very helpful. It helped to explain why my arthritis went into remission on the diet. It turns out my celiac associated gene is DQ9. Gene testing before I was diagnosed celiac would have labeled me with RA (from my understanding and I am certainly no expert on genetics) and I would most likely be now dead as doctors would have labeled me with that.

Figured I should show at least one reference to how I came about that understanding-
http://www.jimmunol....ract/158/7/3545
"Recently, we have proposed that the combination of HLA-DQ and -DR alleles is responsible for the association of the HLA class II region with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). According to this model, some HLA-DQ alleles, namely DQ4, DQ7, DQ8, and DQ9, predispose carriers to severe RA"

The gene tests are not however diagnostic in themselves, no matter who does them. They are however a very valid piece of the puzzle. If you funds are limited IMHO you would be better off getting the stool testing done for the antibodies as that will give you more information if you can't afford both stool and gene testing.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#6 Jestgar

 
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Posted 13 June 2010 - 10:44 AM

Just as a general statement, when gathering opinions on the internet, you should be highly suspicious of anyone who offers a "professional" opinion without proving their credentials, or citing credible, peer-reviewed journals to back their statements.
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My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.
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Leap, and the net will appear.

#7 Skylark

 
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Posted 13 June 2010 - 02:00 PM

Just as a general statement, when gathering opinions on the internet, you should be highly suspicious of anyone who offers a "professional" opinion without proving their credentials, or citing credible, peer-reviewed journals to back their statements.

Are you addressing my post, or Enterolab? The burden of proof of the usefulness of anti-gliadin IgA and anti-tTA fecal antibodies rests with them, not me. Enterolab does not provide any references about fecal antibodies, and if they have sponsored any studies, they have not seen fit to share the results in the peer-reviewed literature or even on their website. They do not even tell prospective customers the sensitivity and specificity of their tests, which I personally find somewhat misleading.
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#8 greenpear

 
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Posted 25 June 2010 - 02:03 PM

I'm assuming the Entero lab testing is for the celiac gene. If it comes back negative does that mean a person definitely does not have celiac but just gluten intolerance? How much does the testing cost and how is it done?


Stop don't use Entero Lab and spread the word. I thought I had a gluten intolerance and decided to go behind my doctor and used Entero Lab. The results came back and said of was gluten intolerant. I finally told my doctor what I did and she asked if I got any better. The answer was a big NO. So she redid the blood test and also did a small bowl biopsy which, as you know, is the gold standard for determining a gluten intolerance. I had NO damage in the small intestine therefore NO gluten intolerance. Entero Lab ripped me off. I eat lots of gluten these days and I having NO problems at all. (I actually had microscopic colitis and I'm fine now after taking asacol for 18 months) Please spread the word. Just find a good GI doctor and work with them.
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#9 burdee

 
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Posted 25 June 2010 - 03:24 PM

Stop don't use Entero Lab and spread the word. I thought I had a gluten intolerance and decided to go behind my doctor and used Entero Lab. The results came back and said of was gluten intolerant. I finally told my doctor what I did and she asked if I got any better. The answer was a big NO. So she redid the blood test and also did a small bowl biopsy which, as you know, is the gold standard for determining a gluten intolerance. I had NO damage in the small intestine therefore NO gluten intolerance. Entero Lab ripped me off. I eat lots of gluten these days and I having NO problems at all. (I actually had microscopic colitis and I'm fine now after taking asacol for 18 months) Please spread the word. Just find a good GI doctor and work with them.


Gluten intolerance manifests in many ways OTHER than intestinal damage and gastrointestinal symptoms. Gluten intolerance does NOT always mean celiac disease. Celiac disease is the intestinal damage manifestion of gluten intolerance. So you can have gluten intolerance WITHOUT having intestinal damage. Read "Healthier Without Wheat" by Stephen Wangen, ND. That book describes all the ways gluten can harm the body, without causing symptoms of or damage related to celiac disease.

Elab didn't rip you off. Small bowel biopsy is the gold standard for determining CELIAC DISEASE, but not all forms of gluten intolerance. Colitis could also be caused by gastrointestinal bugs (parasites or bacteria). I had pseudomembraneous colitis caused by the clostridium difficile bacteria.

I'm glad you recovered from MC, but you may want to consider other physical (esp. nondigestive) symptoms, as you continue to eat gluten. If you develop any symptoms associated with autoimmune conditions or symptoms your doc can't explain, you may want to reconsider your gluten intolerance diagnosis.
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Gluten, dairy, soy, egg, cane sugar, vanilla and nutmeg free. Enterolab diagnosed gluten/casein intolerant 7/04; soy intolerant 8/07. ELISA test diagnosed egg/cane sugar IgG allergies 8/06; vanilla/nutmeg 8/06. 2006-10 diagnosed by DNA Microbial stool tests and successfully treated: Klebsiella, Enterobacter Cloaecae, Cryptosporidia, Candida, C-diff, Achromobacter, H. Pylori and Dientamoeba Fragilis. 6/10 Heidelberg capsule test diagnosed hypochloridia. Vitamin D deficiency, hypothyroiditis, hypochloridia and low white blood cells caused vulnerability to infections. I now take Betaine HCl, probiotics, Vitamin D and T3 thyroid supplement to maintain immunity.


#10 Skylark

 
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Posted 25 June 2010 - 04:52 PM

Greenpear, I'm so sorry to hear you got ripped off. Have you reported this to any consumer organizations? You might try Quackwatch as well.
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#11 ENF

 
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Posted 25 June 2010 - 11:39 PM

I've often wondered if any of Enterolab's gluten intolerance stool test customers ever received results from them that determined they were NOT gluten intolerant? If they have, I wonder what the percentage is. B)
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Celiac diagnosis from positive blood work & endoscope (2005)

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 Subtype 2,8 (double Celiac genes)

#12 jerseyangel

 
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Posted 26 June 2010 - 04:06 AM

I've often wondered if any of Enterolab's gluten intolerance stool test customers ever received results from them that determined they were NOT gluten intolerant? If they have, I wonder what the percentage is. B)

I don't have any facts or figures for you, but from reading on here for the last 5 years or so, I do remember seeing a few people report negative stool testing from Enterolabs.
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Patti


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#13 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 26 June 2010 - 04:15 AM

I've often wondered if any of Enterolab's gluten intolerance stool test customers ever received results from them that determined they were NOT gluten intolerant? If they have, I wonder what the percentage is. B)


There have been people on the board who have reported having negative tests. In some cases it was when one in the family was diagnosed celiac and all were tested. Since most of the folks that go to Enterolab are having issues I don't personally find it unusual that many would show up gluten intolerant. People that feel great and don't have symptoms don't get tested. Gluten intolerance and celiac are very common and many have suffered for years being told by doctors that they have IBS and then the doctors don't test further. The number of IBS patients in this country is very high, big pharma makes a fortune off them. Just look at all the stomach meds lining the store shelves. Do all IBS patients have celiac or gluten intolerance, of course not. Do all folks with celiac or gluten intolerance not have any other issues, that is of course not also. Have many been helped by gluten intolerance being diagnosed, well just look through the board. Some of us were really let down by conventional and naturopathic medicine which simply threw meds at us to try and control symptoms. If Enterolab can help those folks I am all for it. If the diet followed strictly doesn't help then you continue to look for what the problem may be. Should Enterolab be someones first step to diagnosis? No, the first step IMHO should always be conventional medicine but when convential medicine doesn't help, as in my case, Enterolab could be a valid part of the diagnostic process. If I had known of Enterolab it would have saved me thousands of dollars and years of pain and permanent damage because conventional medicine took a look at my false negative blood tests and considered the matter closed.
  • 1
Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#14 frieze

 
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Posted 26 June 2010 - 05:16 AM

we must remember, as raven mentioned, that the persons availing themselves of Enterolab are a self selected group. In that group, it would stand to reason the + rate would be high.
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#15 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 28 June 2010 - 02:27 AM

I would recommend that Enterolab not be part of solving your intestinal problems. Find a good GI doctor and stick with them. See my story below.

Stop don't use Entero Lab and spread the word. I thought I had a gluten intolerance and decided to go behind my doctor and used Entero Lab. The results came back and said I was gluten intolerant and to never consume any product with gluten. I finally told my doctor what I did and she asked if I got any better when I stopped gluten. The answer was a NO. So she redid the blood test and also did a small bowl biopsy which, as you know, is the gold standard for determining a gluten intolerance. I had NO damage in the small intestine therefore NO gluten intolerance. Entero Lab ripped me off. I eat lots of gluten these days and I having NO problems at all. (I actually had microscopic colitis and I'm fine now after taking asacol for 18 months) Please spread the word. Just find a good GI doctor and work with them.


We got your post the first time. Did you get any blood work or a biopsy before you went with Enterolab? Well if not you should have. I am sorry you feel the 'ripped you off' and glad you finally got smart about it and went to a GI doctor, which is what you should have done in the first place. By the way if you are gluten free or gluten light the blood and biopsy will be negative whether you are gluten intolerant or not. Enterolab can be very helpful for those of us who are false negative on testing with conventional GI doctors. Folks are always told here to see a GI doctor first if they can and if the gluten-free diet does not help they are told to keep looking for the cause. Enterolab does not diagnose anything they simply tell you if you are making antibodies to a substance. I am glad your feeling better and finally got yourself to where you should have gone in the first place, the doctor.
  • 1
Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)




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