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Are M&Ms Gluten Free?
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I have some confusion over M&Ms.

M&Ms candy contains Dextrim, but according to a post I read online, the writer, who had celiac disease, contacted M&M/Mars and was told the candy was gluten free as the Dextrim is not gluten containing. I'm curious, then, why in the bestselling book Raising Your Celiac Child by Donna Korn, she lists hundreds of gluten free candies and manufacturers, everything from Hershey's to Cadburys, and does not list M&Ms as an approved candy for celiac kids. Can anyone clear this question up for me?

Thanks!

Emily

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Any list is not 100% complete, and as formulas change, they become dated.

Dextrin is usually safe, although rarely it can be derived from wheat (which would have to be declared in the US under FALCPA).

M&Ms are gluten-free. I have personally checked this out, as I get free ones from Mars reps frequently (my store sells Mars products at retail).

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M&Ms are gluten-free. I have personally checked this out, as I get free ones from Mars reps frequently (my store sells Mars products at retail).

So glad to know this! M&Ms are my weakness. Been strong so far, but never know how long it's going to last. ;)

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There are now some with pretzels. I don't know if cross contamination is an issue or not. We can't have them because of a peanut allergy. So I never checked.

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Hi! I have a 4yr old son with Celiac. He is extremely sensitive to gluten, and eats M and Ms all the time with no reaction. The peanut and plain are both safe, but not sure about ant other types. Skittles are gluten-free too! Enjoy!

I have some confusion over M&Ms.

M&Ms candy contains Dextrim, but according to a post I read online, the writer, who had celiac disease, contacted M&M/Mars and was told the candy was gluten free as the Dextrim is not gluten containing. I'm curious, then, why in the bestselling book Raising Your Celiac Child by Donna Korn, she lists hundreds of gluten free candies and manufacturers, everything from Hershey's to Cadburys, and does not list M&Ms as an approved candy for celiac kids. Can anyone clear this question up for me?

Thanks!

Emily

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There are now some with pretzels. I don't know if cross contamination is an issue or not. We can't have them because of a peanut allergy. So I never checked.

Yeah, I saw those in the store recently too and was wondering if we are now going to start seeing CC issues with M&Ms? I wonder if they are made on the same lines as plain or peanut?

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Be careful with the lists in older books (my version of Dana's book is really old, not sure if there's an updated version). Formula's change over time and what we know changes over time. For example, you can still find vinegar listed as a questionable or even unsafe ingredient, but unless it's malt vinegar it's perfectly safe. Unfortunately the internet never forgets and books stay printed...that's why it's best to check multiple sources, call manufacturers, etc.

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Any list is not 100% complete, and as formulas change, they become dated.

Dextrin is usually safe, although rarely it can be derived from wheat (which would have to be declared in the US under FALCPA).

M&Ms are gluten-free. I have personally checked this out, as I get free ones from Mars reps frequently (my store sells Mars products at retail).

Peter - They are gluten-free, but the real question is: Are they manufactured on the same equipment with other products that contain gluten? I look everywhere online and cannot seem to get this answer.

Seems like companies are great about listing their foods as being "gluten free" per the actual ingredients, but many are withholding about the cross contamination issues. For celiacs who are super sensitive, this is a big issue.

last Friday during a Halloween potluck, I ate some tortilla chips that said they were processed on a line with gluten containing items, and I got sick. Sometimes I take chances, and then regret that I do.

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Peter - They are gluten-free, but the real question is: Are they manufactured on the same equipment with other products that contain gluten? I look everywhere online and cannot seem to get this answer.

Seems like companies are great about listing their foods as being "gluten free" per the actual ingredients, but many are withholding about the cross contamination issues. For celiacs who are super sensitive, this is a big issue.

last Friday during a Halloween potluck, I ate some tortilla chips that said they were processed on a line with gluten containing items, and I got sick. Sometimes I take chances, and then regret that I do.

There was a thread about the concern over the safety of M&M's and possible CC issues a couple of months ago because of the introduction of pretzel M&M's. I can't remember where is was exactly, but I think it was over in the ingredients forum. Some one called and checked and said that the pretzel M&M's were made on overflow lines and that special holiday editions were also possibly made on overflow lines at times. I know that with every item formula's change so they do need to be checked often and any list need to be updated. I think that is a clear enough answer that the majority is on dedicated lines but occasionally some may be routed to overflow lines. For me personally, I prefer to only provide products NOT made on the same lines. So I will give DS regular M&M's, but I will probably not let him have any of the special seasonal colors.

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There was a thread about the concern over the safety of M&M's and possible CC issues a couple of months ago because of the introduction of pretzel M&M's. I can't remember where is was exactly, but I think it was over in the ingredients forum. Some one called and checked and said that the pretzel M&M's were made on overflow lines and that special holiday editions were also possibly made on overflow lines at times. I know that with every item formula's change so they do need to be checked often and any list need to be updated. I think that is a clear enough answer that the majority is on dedicated lines but occasionally some may be routed to overflow lines. For me personally, I prefer to only provide products NOT made on the same lines. So I will give DS regular M&M's, but I will probably not let him have any of the special seasonal colors.

Here is a link to the thread you were referring to

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Here is a link to the thread you were referring to

You are awesome! Thank you.

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I have some confusion over M&Ms.

M&Ms candy contains Dextrim, but according to a post I read online, the writer, who had celiac disease, contacted M&M/Mars and was told the candy was gluten free as the Dextrim is not gluten containing. I'm curious, then, why in the bestselling book Raising Your Celiac Child by Donna Korn, she lists hundreds of gluten free candies and manufacturers, everything from Hershey's to Cadburys, and does not list M&Ms as an approved candy for celiac kids. Can anyone clear this question up for me?

Thanks!

Emily

My 11-year-old daughter eats the plain M&Ms with no problems. She's very sensitive, so we'd know if there were any issues.

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Peter - They are gluten-free, but the real question is: Are they manufactured on the same equipment with other products that contain gluten?

My understanding is that they are produced on equipment that does not process any gluten, but in the same facility where wheat and barley are ingredients in other products.

Until an FDA-regulated definition of gluten-free is in place, many companies will not claim their products are gluten-free. Without a legal definition, it means whatever the plaintiff's attorney can convince a civil jury it means. Mainstream companies do not test their ingredients or final products for possible gluten contamination because of what it would cost.

Due to the potential legal liability, Mars Inc. will not claim ANY of their products to be gluten-free, even though many actually are.

The rule being considered by the FDA would require that no gluten be intentionally included, and that testing would find less than 20 parts per million (20ppm) of gluten in the finished product. Twenty ppm is a small amount, but it is not ZERO. Nevertheless, a product which actually contains ZERO gluten tests as less than 20ppm. ZERO can never be proven scientifically.

Even with testing, and elaborate precautions at the manufacturing facility, it is always possible for an ingredient to arrive already contaminated, or for a person to enter the facility with gluten on their person. There can be no absolute guarantees.

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The rule being considered by the FDA would require that no gluten be intentionally included, and that testing would find less than 20 parts per million (20ppm) of gluten in the finished product.

And the debate is about whether small amounts of gluten, less than 20ppm, could knowingly be included and still permit the product to be labeled gluten-free.

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Just a quick note to all. 

I travel for a living and have many family members who are celiacs, so I always have to check what I buy them. 

If you travel abroad be aware that some m&ms are not gluten free. M&ms in Australia are Not gluten-free and it is as easy as checking the packet. 

So far I know that m&m's in the USA, Singapore and the UK are all gluten free. (This specifically applies to plain and peanut m&ms only)

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I remember this thread... that M&Ms are gluten-free --- but not specialty M&Ms. I am very confused as I almost bought the regular M&Ms today. However I read on the package (in small, small print): "Allergens: eggs, soy; wheat!" I checked out the peanut ones & the peanut butter ones. Wheat wasn't listed on them. Can anyone speak to this? I've been eating the plain mini-M&Ms and have noticed an increase in my HD rash. I am super, super worried about this. Thanks! Olivia

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3 hours ago, Olivia said:

I remember this thread... that M&Ms are gluten-free --- but not specialty M&Ms. I am very confused as I almost bought the regular M&Ms today. However I read on the package (in small, small print): "Allergens: eggs, soy; wheat!" I checked out the peanut ones & the peanut butter ones. Wheat wasn't listed on them. Can anyone speak to this? I've been eating the plain mini-M&Ms and have noticed an increase in my HD rash. I am super, super worried about this. Thanks! Olivia

Maybe minis are a bit different?  

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Posted (edited)

Hi. Thanks for the reply. I read "wheat" on the packaging of the regular / plain M&Ms package. Not on the mini's package. I've never seen a package of mini-M&Ms. I've only seen them as ice cream toppings. I'll buy a pack and photograph what I read. Maybe this would be helpful? Thanks again, Olivia 

Edited by Olivia
spelled my name incorrectly
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16 hours ago, Olivia said:

I remember this thread... that M&Ms are gluten-free --- but not specialty M&Ms. I am very confused as I almost bought the regular M&Ms today. However I read on the package (in small, small print): "Allergens: eggs, soy; wheat!" I checked out the peanut ones & the peanut butter ones. Wheat wasn't listed on them. Can anyone speak to this? I've been eating the plain mini-M&Ms and have noticed an increase in my HD rash. I am super, super worried about this. Thanks! Olivia

Olivia....what country are you located in?  I just bought a bag of regular M&M's from the vending machine at work. They are the milk chocolate ones and it is a 1.69 oz. bag.  The allergy warning states: Contains milk and soy. May contain peanuts.  The "best before" date on it is for April of 2017 so this is a recent bag.

 

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It's good to hear some who are very sensitive can eat them, but I'd have a panic attack at the thought of putting those in my mouth just because there are no direct gluten ingredients.  If they are not marked "gluten free" then that means the company is not testing it.  There is the possibility of cross contamination from one of their suppliers even if they are made in a production line that does not process gluten. And it can vary from batch to batch, I'd be very very scared to eat those.  Maybe one day they'll get with it and test for gluten and mark their products as such.

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Hi Olivia,

If the package label says they have wheat in them that's good enough reason not to eat them, regardless of what other people say about it.  Companies don't always use the same ingredients in every country, so the ones you are looking at could be different than ones made in the USA.  They could even be different in the USA if they were made at a different plant.  There is no law against using gluten ingredients in the USA.  You can always call the manufacturer to verify.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Beverage said:

It's good to hear some who are very sensitive can eat them, but I'd have a panic attack at the thought of putting those in my mouth just because there are no direct gluten ingredients.  If they are not marked "gluten free" then that means the company is not testing it.  There is the possibility of cross contamination from one of their suppliers even if they are made in a production line that does not process gluten. And it can vary from batch to batch, I'd be very very scared to eat those.  Maybe one day they'll get with it and test for gluten and mark their products as such.

Yes, and then we all can celebrate the $5.00 bag of M&M's.  :huh:

One could argue that everything can potentially be cc'd from anywhere but if you follow that to such a degree, then you would not have much to eat and your food variety would greatly suffer. Yes, I know no one needs M&M's to live but many people have come on here and argued that melons made them sick from gluten cc.

In 11 years gluten-free, I have learned that the best thing you can do is really educate yourself on how cc occurs and the reality of choosing safe foods on the gluten-free diet.  I am extremely sensitive and take absolutely no chances and have learned that you can eat some shared facility items with great success without being glutened and many items that list no gluten ingredients are also perfectly safe. I have eaten M&M's many, many times since diagnosis and have never had one batch that made me sick or was worried that gluten content can vary from batch to batch because I always feel good after ingesting them.  My blood work has always been in the stellar range, which does make it easy for those of us who had very high blood work results initially.  After the learning curve has been mastered with the gluten-free diet, there just should not be fear when deciding what to eat.  I am guessing that the M&M bag the OP referenced was not in the US.  There can be great differences in candy ingredients, depending on what country you are in.

 

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They were labeling some of the M&Ms gluten-free.  They have a good allergy policy/protocol.  I believe they said that special runs - like Christmas colors, for instance, might not be gluten-free as they are run on different machinery with other special flavors.

 

This is in the US.

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That's very helpful information, Kareng. I'll definately check for the gluten-free labeling next time I'm at the store!

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