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Anyone From South Africa


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20 replies to this topic

#16

 
ElseB

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Posted 18 September 2011 - 04:07 PM

I'm Canadian but my dad is from SA. We have a butcher nearby that makes gluten free boerewors. Just had some for dinner for tonight, made on the braai! Yum!
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#17

 
Rodger

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 11:27 PM

Hi all.
Does anybody know where I can get gluten free beer in South Africa. Is there any available in SA? There seem to be a quite a few in the rest of the world.
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#18

 
auzzi

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Posted 31 October 2011 - 09:46 PM

we really have very little options in the way of going-out food & if we can find it is exorbitantly priced & take-aways are pretty much no existent.



Welcome to the Coeliac's world. The cost of gluten-free food is expensive, no matter where in the worl you are located. A small captive audience tends to pay the price ...

A lot of Indian food is naturally gluten-free. The same for asian food.

gluten-free noodles found in asian supermarkets - rice noodles, potato starch noodles, moong bean starch noodles and sweet potato starch noodles
Asian flours - rice flour, glutinous or sweet rice flour, potato starch, sweet potato starch, tapioca starch

gluten-free Flours found in Indian supermarkets: cornmeal, cornflour, corn starch, sorghum, soy, millet, water chestnut, besan, chickpea, rice flour, mung bean flour, dhal flours, dhokra flour, arrowroot

Find yourself a cookbook or Internet site and jump in ...

South African Associations -

http://www.celiac.co...8-south-africa/

http://www.allergysa...OL_Food_007.asp

A gluten-free Diet for South Africans
http://archive.samj....TH AFRICANS.pdf

A quick Internet search ...

GlutenFreeSA
http://www.glutenfreesa.co.za/

Gluten free in South Africa
http://gfsouthafrica.blogspot.com/

Fresh Earth Food Store
http://www.fresheart...luten-free.aspx

Master Health Products/Dr Schr range of gluten-free
http://www.glutenfree.co.za/

Nature's Choice Gluten-Free Products
http://www.naturesch...-free-products/

Entice Health Products
http://www.daisyhealth.co.za/

Faithful to Nature Gluten Free
http://www.faithful-...-p-1-c-215.html

Edencrest, your wheat & gluten free shopping paradise
http://www.edencrest.co.za/

Natural Way Healthy Living Gluten-free
http://www.naturalwa...e_Products.html

Orgran Gluten free products
Official distributor: SA Natural Products (Pty) Ltd,
Box 2, Botha's Hill, 3660, KwaZulu Natal
Phone:
info@sanatural.co.za
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#19

 
lucia

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 01:31 PM

I just returned from a trip to SA, where I visited Jo-Burg, Cape Town and Durban. I wanted to comment that I found gluten-free food with no more or no less difficulty than in the states. I tried researching options before I left, and found little information online. Once I was there though, to my surprise, I found many options and a range of people who knew what "gluten-free" meant. (Of course, I also encountered many people who had no idea what I was talking about.)

Restaurants that catered to tourists in Cape Town had a high awareness of "gluten-free." I even had a gluten-free menu handed to me at one of these. Remarkably in Cape Town, I stumbled into a bakery with gluten-free products and also discovered a health food store with a wide variety of gluten-free products. In Durban, the owner of my (moderately-priced) b&b served me gluten-free bread. Generally, groceries in the cities I visited carried gluten-free products at about the same rate and the same cost (high) as in the states. But most importantly - and significant to someone coming from the states - foods were all labelled with allergen information. I ate prepared foods from Woolworth's a lot for that reason.

South Africa's ethnic diversity also made eating out easier. There are a wide variety of Indian restaurants (especially in KwaZulu Natal). And native African food does not use gluten. For example, traditional South African food features pap, which is corn-based. I also ate Ethiopian food and pan-African food, which were naturally gluten-free (in both cases, my server could confirm this).

I'd actually recommend SA as a place to travel for someone with gluten issues. The tourist track is well-equipped to deal with gluten intolerance, and generally the country is very hospitable to us gluten intolerant folks. Whatever frustrations I had there were equivalent to what I've felt in the states. Actually, slightly less so thanks to the SA system of labeling for allergens.
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#20

 
planetzogjo

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 10:51 AM

Hi there. I have Systemic Lupus Erythematosis. I have been on Cortisone and Anti-rejection drugs for 16 months now. I have recently been told by my doctor to go on a gluten-free diet. But I do not know where to start!!! I have been looking on the internet for a list of South African gluten-free foods - but with no success. I am quite technologically-challenged too which does not help either. I live on the East Rand. Can anybody please help? Where do I start?
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#21

 
MalJaros

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Posted 23 May 2015 - 02:03 AM

I just returned from a trip to SA, where I visited Jo-Burg, Cape Town and Durban. I wanted to comment that I found gluten-free food with no more or no less difficulty than in the states. I tried researching options before I left, and found little information online. Once I was there though, to my surprise, I found many options and a range of people who knew what "gluten-free" meant. (Of course, I also encountered many people who had no idea what I was talking about.)

Restaurants that catered to tourists in Cape Town had a high awareness of "gluten-free." I even had a gluten-free menu handed to me at one of these. Remarkably in Cape Town, I stumbled into a bakery with gluten-free products and also discovered a health food store with a wide variety of gluten-free products. In Durban, the owner of my (moderately-priced) b&b served me gluten-free bread. Generally, groceries in the cities I visited carried gluten-free products at about the same rate and the same cost (high) as in the states. But most importantly - and significant to someone coming from the states - foods were all labelled with allergen information. I ate prepared foods from Woolworth's a lot for that reason.

South Africa's ethnic diversity also made eating out easier. There are a wide variety of Indian restaurants (especially in KwaZulu Natal). And native African food does not use gluten. For example, traditional South African food features pap, which is corn-based. I also ate Ethiopian food and pan-African food, which were naturally gluten-free (in both cases, my server could confirm this).

I'd actually recommend SA as a place to travel for someone with gluten issues. The tourist track is well-equipped to deal with gluten intolerance, and generally the country is very hospitable to us gluten intolerant folks. Whatever frustrations I had there were equivalent to what I've felt in the states. Actually, slightly less so thanks to the SA system of labeling for allergens.

I endorse all that Lucia says about the availability of gluten free food in Durban, where I have lived for thirty years. The recent diagnosis of gluten-intolerance sent me searching for suitable food outlets.  Yes, Indian restaurants tends to be gluten free but you need to check with the chef about specific dishes.  Two restaurants that were fully aware were an organic restaurant in Glenwood (closed weekends) and the Kung Thai restaurant in Umhlanga Rocks where the manager assured me that everything was gluten free except the soy sauce.  Yes, Woolworth foodstores do have a small selection of (high priced) gluten free foods and some of the Spar franchisees have tasty fresh-baked gluten-free bread, reasonably priced but in limited quantities and not every day.  The larger pharmacists sell a wide range of "heakth foods" including gluten free products and, as Lucia discovered, most grocery products list potential allergens in small print on the labels.  The only Pizza outlet I could find that advertised gluten-free products was a disappointment.


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