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Dry Onion Soup Mix
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I found a chicken recipe that calls for an envelope of dry onion soup mix. Does anyone know if this has gluten in it? I know the beefy mushroom dry soup mix does have gluten, but I don't have the onion soup mix. I was hoping someone could give me advice before I get excited about a new chicken recipe only to find out my hubby can't have it once I get to the store. Thanks

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Lipton dry onion soup mix is gluten-free. I can't speak to other brands.

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Be careful to get the Lipton onion soup mix and not the Lipton golden onion soup mix. The labels looks the same, and my wife has made the mistake a few times.

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I thought the Lipton was not Gluten Free. Is it the onion versus golden onion? I had been buying a local brand (Randall's / Safeway) because I was avoiding the Lipton.

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Most Lipton soups have noodles in them which contain gluten. The regular dry onion is gluten-free--to my knowledge it is the ONLY Lipton mix that is.

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The box of Lipton Onion Soup Mix I just bought was not gluten free. It contained yeast extract (barley). It was bought in Mass at a large chain supermarket (Stop & Shop) but was manufactured in Canada. It always pays to check the labels every time you but a product!

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Bought Simply Organic french onion soup mix today. 99cents at Fred Meyer/Kroger in the health food section!

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Most Lipton soups have noodles in them which contain gluten. The regular dry onion is gluten-free--to my knowledge it is the ONLY Lipton mix that is.

Lipton's ingedients have changed. They reduced the amount of sodium and added barley to replace it. :angry: Lipton's onion soup mix is no longer gluten-free. There may be some of the old formula still in stores, so check the ingredients carefully.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yeast

Yeast extract

Main article: Yeast extract

Marmite and Vegemite have a distinctive dark colour

Marmite and Vegemite, products made from yeast extract

Yeast extract is the common name for various forms of processed yeast products that are used as food additives or flavours. They are often used in the same way that monosodium glutamate (MSG) is used, and like MSG, often contain free glutamic acid. The general method for making yeast extract for food products such as Vegemite and Marmite on a commercial scale is to add salt to a suspension of yeast making the solution hypertonic, which leads to the cells shrivelling up.compounds, a process of self-destruction. The dying yeast cells are then heated to complete their breakdown This triggers autolysis, where the yeast's digestive enzymes break their own proteins down into simpler , after which the husks (yeast with thick cell walls which would give poor texture) are separated. Yeast autolysates are used in Vegemite and Promite (Australia); Marmite, Bovril and Oxo (the United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland and South Africa); and Cenovis (Switzerland)

(the bold is mine)...thus, my non-scientific brain tells me that the offending (barley) proteins are no longer a danger to my body due to the fact that the autolysis yeast is rendered gluten free, through this process.

:D:blink:

I tried this am to contact Unilevel, unsuccessfully. I will continue to try, or others could try:

1-877-995-4490

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Officially just in from Unilever via a wonderful company representative!

There has be NO formulation change regarding Lipton Onion Dry Soup Mix. Through Unilever policy of full disclosure, they have recently decided to include to source of the autolyzed yeast extract, as barley.

The trace barley in the finished product is 0.09 part per million in the Onion Soup, and 0.04 parts per million in the Vegetable Soup. Both are far below the standard (20ppm) of what is considered a safe level for a person with Celiac to consume.

Enjoy! :D

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Lipton dry onion soup mix is gluten-free. I can't speak to other brands.

The last time I looked, Lipton Dry Onion Soup Mix had malt in it. I found Kroger Dry Onion Soup Mix does not have malt.

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this topic is a couple of years old - manufacturers change their ingredients - always read the label :)  

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The last time I looked, Lipton Dry Onion Soup Mix had malt in it. I found Kroger Dry Onion Soup Mix does not have malt.

This is true, although the amount of barley is barely detectable and and well below the level considered safe for people with Celiac Disease to consume.  I have had extensive conversations with the company. It is in keeping with Unilevers full disclosure policy.

 

None of the other Lipton Dry Mixes are gluten free - only the Onion.

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Sorry to sound like a dolt, but I'm just not sure about this dry onion soup mix. I have a package of Lipton Recipe Secrets onion soup mix (dark blue writing on the white envelope) and I threw the box away. The lipton website says it does have barley, but some posters on here say if it does have gluten, it's not enough to worry about.

 

I was just diagnosed with celiac 3 days ago, so I'm extremely new to this gluten free stuff. Can anyone tell me definitively if I can or can not use this soup mix? I want to make beef stew tomorrow in my crock pot, now that I've found gluten free flour all I need to do is make sure I can eat the soup mix.

 

Can anyone help a newbie? :-)

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Because its "autolyzed yeast extract" it is so overprocessed, it doesn't have any gluten left. 

 

I make crockpot stew but I don't use this mix or any flour.  I add onions and bay leaves for the seasoning.  I use instant tapioca.

 

Crockpot Beef Stew

2 lbs beef stew meat, cubed

5 carrots sliced thinly

1 onion, diced

3 ribs of celery, diced

5 potatoes cubed (use the yellow potatoes and you don't need to peel them)

28 oz can tomatoes

1/3 cup quick-cooking or "Rapid" tapioca

4 bay leaves

salt & pepper to taste

Combine & cook 10-12 hours on low or 5-6 on high.

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Because its "autolyzed yeast extract" it is so overprocessed, it doesn't have any gluten left. 

 

I make crockpot stew but I don't use this mix or any flour.  I add onions and bay leaves for the seasoning.  I use instant tapioca.

 

Crockpot Beef Stew

2 lbs beef stew meat, cubed

5 carrots sliced thinly

1 onion, diced

3 ribs of celery, diced

5 potatoes cubed (use the yellow potatoes and you don't need to peel them)

28 oz can tomatoes

1/3 cup quick-cooking or "Rapid" tapioca

4 bay leaves

salt & pepper to taste

Combine & cook 10-12 hours on low or 5-6 on high.

Thank you Kareng! This is all new to me. I have all the ingredients ready for my stew, I just need to swap out the regular flour for gluten free. I'm keeping your recipe for the next time I make stew - it looks delicious!

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Officially just in from Unilever via a wonderful company representative!

There has be NO formulation change regarding Lipton Onion Dry Soup Mix. Through Unilever policy of full disclosure, they have recently decided to include to source of the autolyzed yeast extract, as barley.

The trace barley in the finished product is 0.09 part per million in the Onion Soup, and 0.04 parts per million in the Vegetable Soup. Both are far below the standard (20ppm) of what is considered a safe level for a person with Celiac to consume.

Enjoy! biggrin.gif

That works out to about 90 parts per billion--about one half of one percent of the level considered acceptable. I have used the product in the past and will continue to do so.

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Yay!! Thanks for the info :) 

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