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New To Eating Out Gluten Free


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25 replies to this topic

#1 lilbit

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Posted 24 June 2010 - 06:04 AM

I'm a big ol foodie! I love food! I really like eating at hole in the wall ethnic places and I'm curious how you do this gluten free?

When you go into a resturant where you don't speak the language, how do you ask if it's gluten free?

Also, how about the "fancier" resturants, do you get treated wierd when you ask for gluten free?
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#2 gfreegirlie

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Posted 24 June 2010 - 06:30 AM

I'm a big ol foodie! I love food! I really like eating at hole in the wall ethnic places and I'm curious how you do this gluten free?

When you go into a resturant where you don't speak the language, how do you ask if it's gluten free?

Also, how about the "fancier" resturants, do you get treated wierd when you ask for gluten free?



Everytime I have gone to a resturant where I didn't speak the languge I have gotten poisened with Gluten. What I try to do is fine places with gluten free menus and go there depending on the food type that I want. If I want chineese food then I go to PF Changs. If I want pizza I go to Pizza Fusion. American styled food Claim Jumpers has a good menu though I am vegetarian so it's extra limited for me there.
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*Gluten-free
*Strict Vegetarian

On the Gluten Free diet almost a year now.

Still constantly getting glutened.

#3 jststric

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Posted 24 June 2010 - 06:43 AM

Personally, I find the nicer the restaurant, the easier it is. They usually have more options and the chefs are usually very open to talking to you about your needs. The "holes" are the impossible ones for me. Now, if you know there is a real cook in them....one that does more than open food-service products, then you might have a chance of getting something special-ordered. As for the foreign languages....there are dining cards available in different languages that explain your needs. Someone else may be able to explain those better than I. I think one brand is called Triumph Dining Cards. There are others also. Best wishes and if you find a way of enjoying the HOLES....please let us know!! I miss them alot!
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#4 Jestgar

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Posted 24 June 2010 - 07:17 AM

The "holes" are the impossible ones for me.

But ya never know. I walked into a cafe and told the order taker that I couldn't eat gluten and he responded with "Is that all you can't eat?"
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#5 GlutenFreeManna

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Posted 24 June 2010 - 08:38 AM

I avoid the little hole-in-the-wall places mostly. I have found a few local places while traveling that actually have gluten free menus. (search glutenfreeregistry.com) If they don't have a gluten free menu, however I don't go there anymore. I have gotten really good at learning how to make some of the ethnic food I miss. I just discovered a great Asian market in my area that has things like rice flour, rice noodles and rice paper wrappers for much less than the regular grocery stores. Produce is cheaper there as well. Last night I made some yummy spring rolls with peanut dipping sauce. These would probably be gluten free at the local Thai place, but they may not be soy free, which I need. Because I made them myself I was able to make sure they were gluten free and soy free.
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A simple meal with love is better than a feast where there is hatred. Proverbs 15:17 (CEV)

#6 lilbit

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 03:50 AM

I will do some research on holes and see how it goes and report back :) Do you call ahead for the nicer resturants? Or can you still be food-ly spontaneous?

I am coming to the conclusion that I'm going to have to learn how to cook more ethnic food if I want to eat it...

Now, here's a wierd question-

Have you ever brought your own condiments to a resturant? Like gluten-free soy sauce to a sushi place?
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#7 GlutenFreeManna

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 04:38 AM

I take my own dressings all the time. I'm sure you could take your own soy sauce in to a sushi place. It's harder to be spontaneous while gluten free. Unless you are okay with leaving and going someplace else if they can't accommodate you or sitting and watching your friends eat while you have nothing. Then you are being spontaneous, but also starving. It's better if you know ahead where and what you can safely eat. Once you have been to a place a few times and know how well they will accommodate you then you can just decide to go there at the last minute. However, most places will do better if you don't go at peak hours. This was hard for me in the beginning because I like to try new foods and now I'm really restricted to fewer choices when I eat out.
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A simple meal with love is better than a feast where there is hatred. Proverbs 15:17 (CEV)

#8 Skylark

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 08:32 AM

I've gotten glutened so many times at "hole in the wall ethnic places" that I have completely given up. I used to love restaurants like that but I just can't get past the language barrier. There are gluten free cards you can print and try.
http://www.celiactra...rant-cards.html

At really good restaurants, I have been treated extremely well and gotten good food that I didn't react to. A friend of mine with a masters degree from a culinary school told me that all sorts of different food sensitivities are addressed in culinary training. I do call ahead if I know I'm going ahead of time.

And yes, I bring gluten-free soy sauce to sushi places if I remember. I've learned to like sushi without soy sauce so I forget a lot now. I pour a little into the provided dish and nobody has ever raised an eyebrow.
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#9 lilbit

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 08:35 AM

I take my own dressings all the time. I'm sure you could take your own soy sauce in to a sushi place. It's harder to be spontaneous while gluten free. Unless you are okay with leaving and going someplace else if they can't accommodate you or sitting and watching your friends eat while you have nothing. Then you are being spontaneous, but also starving. It's better if you know ahead where and what you can safely eat. Once you have been to a place a few times and know how well they will accommodate you then you can just decide to go there at the last minute. However, most places will do better if you don't go at peak hours. This was hard for me in the beginning because I like to try new foods and now I'm really restricted to fewer choices when I eat out.

LOL@ starving! Well, I guess I'll make a little eating out bag and shove all my condiments in it and take it with me when i go out. That should be funny.
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#10 GlutenFreeManna

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 09:52 AM

LOL@ starving! Well, I guess I'll make a little eating out bag and shove all my condiments in it and take it with me when i go out. That should be funny.


Hey, whatever you need to do to eat safe. All the better if you can laugh at yourself and your friends will laugh with you. My friends had a good laugh at me when I was invited to dinner and brought my own pear and walnut salad--They knew I was bringing it because it might be all I could eat and I asked if I could cut the pears in their kitchen before-hand so they wouldn't get brown. What they laughed at me for was that I brought my own cutting board and knife! I didn't bother explaining cc at that point (the technical stuff tends to put a damper on a good party) I just laughed and said I wasn't sure they would have an extra cutting board with all the other prep they were doing for the meal. I made it sound like I was just being over-prepared instead of being ultra-paranoid that they may have cut bread on the cutting boards at their place.
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A simple meal with love is better than a feast where there is hatred. Proverbs 15:17 (CEV)

#11 lucia

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 06:58 PM

I was worried about this too - as well as traveling outside the U.S. - but I've realized that non-American cuisines are more accommodating to a gluten-free diet. I think that success depends on choosing the right dish and having a server who can describe the ingredients it uses at that paticuliar restaurant.

- South Asian food, including Indian, is almost entirely gluten-free, except for the breads. South Indians make dosas from rice flour. Even Indian desserts are mostly gluten-free, made from nuts.

- African food is mostly gluten-free. Usually, African food is served with rice. Ethiopians make a spongy buckwheat pancake that is delicious.

- Mexican food traditionally uses corn as a base. Your server should be able to tell you if their chips are made of corn and if they have corn tortillas.

- Thai food uses rice noodles or rice as a base. Pad Thai is traditionally made with a peanut/tamarind sauce.

- Even Italian food has some good choices for dishes, such as risotto or polenta. And Irish food uses a lot of potato.

The one I haven't figured out is Chinese food. It seems like soy sauce is ubiquitous. If you have any ideas on that ...
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#12 Skylark

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 08:07 PM

I got badly glutened at a Thai restaurant where I asked about wheat ingredients and had spring rolls with rice wrappers and Pad Thai. Someone said that they had seen packages of Thai rice noodles with wheat starch listed as an ingredient, and that may have been my problem. I have had enough issues with Thai that I don't eat at Thai places any more.

As for Chinese, you can usually get plain steamed vegetables and rice. :) Some places make a white sauce that doesn't have any soy sauce or oyster sauce but it might be made with a gluten-containing chicken broth.
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#13 mushroom

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 08:18 PM

I don't eat at any ethnic restaurants any more :( If it's not wheat it's soy, if it's not soy it's corn, if it's not any of those it's either nightshades or citrus. Mexican food is a nightmare :blink: Lectins in flour and corn tortillas, lectins in tomatoes and salsa, lectins in refried beans (legumes), lectins in anything citrus (think Margaritas) :unsure: Good ole 'Merican food is all I'll eat. :D Hopefully served by someone who speaks good English. No holes in the wall for this gal :ph34r:
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

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Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

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#14 Jestgar

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Posted 26 June 2010 - 04:38 AM

aw shroomie :( , come to my house, I'll make you any ethnic food you want, with your preferred list of ingredients. :)
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"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"
- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.
- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

#15 mushroom

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Posted 26 June 2010 - 10:15 AM

aw shroomie :( , come to my house, I'll make you any ethnic food you want, with your preferred list of ingredients. :)


Still bet you couldn't do Mexican :ph34r:, but thanks for the offer :):wub:
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator


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