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Buckwheat Bread


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44 replies to this topic

#1 halfrunner

 
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Posted 28 June 2010 - 05:20 PM

I was home today and got an idea for a "regular" loaf of bread for DH. When he got home from work, his reaction was "THAT'S BREAD!!!" :D He would have easily eaten a good portion of the loaf if he wasn't watching his diet.

I don't have a story to how it was developed, it was a blind attempt loosely based on Michael Ruhlman's (reguar wheat based) bread ratio from his book "Ratio". Emphasis on the word loosely. :P

Buckwheat bread

2 1/4 c. buckwheat flour
1 3/4 c. rice flour
1 1/8 c potato starch
3/4 tsp. dough enhancer (or vinegar)
3 tsp. salt
3 tsp. xanthan gum
3 tbsp. ground flax seed
3 tbsp. sugar
2 1/2 tbsp. yeast
1 1/2 eggs (beaten)***
1/2 c. oil
2 3/4 to 3 c. warm water

Combine all the dry ingredients in a stand mixer, mix well. Add oil, egg and 2 1/2 c. water (you will have to eyeball the rest) and beat for about 2 min. on low speed. The consistency should be like sugar cookie dough thickness.

Divide into 2 (4x9x2.5 ie "standard") loaf pans (I used dark nonstick) and let rise in a warm place for 40-50 min. Heat oven, bake at 350 degrees for 25-35 minutes.

Bread should sound hollow when gently thumped. Immediately remove from pan and cool on a cooling rack for 3 hours or until completely cool.

****My trick is to beat two eggs, then pour 3 oz. worth into the dough. (Large eggs are usually 2 oz. each.)
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#2 Takala

 
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Posted 30 June 2010 - 10:11 AM

Sounds interesting!
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#3 halfrunner

 
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Posted 12 July 2010 - 11:04 AM

I was curious to see what would happen if I made this recipe with all rice flour and no buckwheat. It came out like a regular loaf of white bread. I was pleasantly surprised, although I was pretty worried about how this was going to turn out when I was making it.
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#4 mushroom

 
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Posted 12 July 2010 - 11:31 AM

I got all excited, halfrunner, when I saw "a recipe for Buckwheat Bread" and then I saw the potato starch :( . However, I am going to try making it with buckwheat and rice flour only and see what happens. My gluten-free bakery at home bakes batches of buckwheat bread for me omitting the potato starch and it is hard to tell the difference so dh says, although of course they won't give me the recipe. Would love to be able to duplicate it as it is soooo good fresh with butter, just like real bread as your hubby says.
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#5 halfrunner

 
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Posted 12 July 2010 - 03:29 PM

I got all excited, halfrunner, when I saw "a recipe for Buckwheat Bread" and then I saw the potato starch :( . However, I am going to try making it with buckwheat and rice flour only and see what happens. My gluten-free bakery at home bakes batches of buckwheat bread for me omitting the potato starch and it is hard to tell the difference so dh says, although of course they won't give me the recipe. Would love to be able to duplicate it as it is soooo good fresh with butter, just like real bread as your hubby says.


You don't have to use potato starch. Corn or tapioca starch would be just as good. You need some sort of starch, that is the glue in the dough.

Sorry, I usually try to include cornstarch or tapioca starch along with the potato starch in any baking recipe I post. :( Somehow we just got in the habit of only using potato starch. ;)
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#6 Monklady123

 
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Posted 13 July 2010 - 04:52 AM

Sounds good! Adding this to my list of possible recipes. Me, who hates to cook and bake. lol.. I'm just recently diagnosed so I think I'll be getting over my fear of baking, at least. I'm buying a new stove/oven tomorrow so once I get an oven with good temperature control I'll be trying some of the recipes you all have posted here. :)
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#7 mushroom

 
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Posted 13 July 2010 - 01:49 PM

Well I had already made the recipe subbing brown rice flour for the potato starch before I saw your post, halfrunner. It turned out pretty good, although I was really unsure about the amount water because the dough kept clinging to the paddle of my Kitchen Aid Mixer. And because our humidity is really low here - about 13% at that time - I added the whole 3 cups of water, plus a little bit. The dough doubled during the rise and came out very moist but a little bit dense. Hubby liked it though - thought if I added caraway seeds it would taste like rye bread (I gave him a ham and cheese sandwich :lol: ) I will try it with the tapioca starch next time and see what happens. I presume the dough should not cling to the paddle???
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#8 halfrunner

 
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Posted 13 July 2010 - 04:11 PM

I presume the dough should not cling to the paddle???


Oh, it definitely will. :P I'm sure that you did fine with the 3c. of water, since it rose and didn't collapse on you after baking. I haven't found a gluten-free bread that isn't at least somewhat dense, although toasting really seems to make a difference. Anyway, I find that this dough is sturdy enough to handle some extra water without too much fuss. ;)

I'm glad your DH liked it.

Laura
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#9 Takala

 
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Posted 13 July 2010 - 06:00 PM

Sounds good! Adding this to my list of possible recipes. Me, who hates to cook and bake. lol.. I'm just recently diagnosed so I think I'll be getting over my fear of baking, at least. I'm buying a new stove/oven tomorrow so once I get an oven with good temperature control I'll be trying some of the recipes you all have posted here. :)


_________________________

Baking's easy. It's the eating that can be challenging.

I keep thinking of the immortal Peg Bracken, who wrote the old, classic "I Hate to Cook Book." The chapter on leftovers says "every family needs a dog."

The thing with gluten free baking, is that sometimes there will be results that are somewhat sub prime.

If you have a microwave, you can try the bun in a cup type recipes, especially if playing around with a new gluten-free flour mix. This way, you can quickly see if a small amount of whatever ingredients you are using are pleasing or not, without having to wait for an hour for a full loaf to be done. And they are handy- you can mix the ingredients right in a cereal bowl or ramekin, and bake it directly in the microwave for about a minute and a half.

With the over baked gluten free bread loaves, always stick a table knife in the loaf and pull it out and check to see if it is clean, after you have tapped them on the top. If a sticky residue remains, bake for 5 to 10 minutes longer. You may have to tip the loaf out of the pan and bake it on its side or upside down a minute or two to finish the crust. This has saved me many gummy loaves.
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#10 Monklady123

 
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Posted 14 July 2010 - 05:37 AM

Good tips Takala. Thanks! :)

I'm leaving shortly to go look at new stoves, so hopefully by next week I'll have a working oven.
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#11 mushroom

 
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Posted 14 July 2010 - 07:03 AM

_________________________



The thing with gluten free baking, is that sometimes there will be results that are somewhat sub prime. . You may have to tip the loaf out of the pan and bake it on its side or upside down a minute or two to finish the crust. This has saved me many gummy loaves.


My sub prime loaves usually end up as croutons, bread crumbs or squirrel food, depending on their degree of subprimeness :P

And yes, I too (actually on all my loaves) bake for another five minutes out of the pan because I love crustiness (must be why I have naturally curly hair :rolleyes: )
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#12 DMarie

 
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Posted 19 July 2010 - 01:37 PM

Buckwheat bread

2 1/4 c. buckwheat flour
1 3/4 c. rice flour
1 1/8 c potato starch
3/4 tsp. dough enhancer (or vinegar)
3 tsp. salt
3 tsp. xanthan gum
3 tbsp. ground flax seed
3 tbsp. sugar
2 1/2 tbsp. yeast
1 1/2 eggs (beaten)***
1/2 c. oil
2 3/4 to 3 c. warm water


Just wanted to double check on the salt amount. Is 3 tsp correct? Seems like more than recipes usually call for - but - I also know salt is very important to the outcome.

Can't wait to try this recipe - my DD and I really like buckwheat and heartier type breads. :-)
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Gluten Intolerant. Celiac bloodwork - negative (levels were tested after being very low gluten for over a year).
No other testing done (not worth the pain). Mostly Gluten Free since 2003. Stopped all gluten 2006.

2 daughters also gluten intolerant (14 and 18). Youngest is very sensitive. Bloodwork done before trying a gluten free diet - negative. Oldest decided to do a gluten challenge before any testing.

#13 halfrunner

 
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Posted 20 July 2010 - 10:07 AM

Just wanted to double check on the salt amount. Is 3 tsp correct? Seems like more than recipes usually call for - but - I also know salt is very important to the outcome.

Can't wait to try this recipe - my DD and I really like buckwheat and heartier type breads. :-)


That is what I used. It is a lot, because DH said it was too bland with 1 1/2 and 2 tsp. of salt respectively.

If you don't want to use that much, I doubt it would make any real difference, just don't leave it out entirely. :P
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#14 sa1937

 
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Posted 25 July 2010 - 04:33 AM

I made this bread yesterday but cut back the ingredients to make only one loaf...nothing like having the oven on when we had a heat index of over 100.

My initial observation is that the bread has a very pleasant flavor. I think I like buckwheat better than sorghum. The bread rose nicely (I put it in a warm oven to rise). I also covered it with aluminum foil (sprayed with non-stick cooking spray), which stuck to the top of the loaf when I removed it and the top collapsed slightly. It didn't rise any more during baking.

I figured I'd end up with a gummy underbaked loaf...not so. Using an instant read thermometer, the bread was at 208 when I took it out of the oven. After I took it out of the pan, I put it back in the oven for about 10 min. I was surprised that the crust was not overly brown, something I've had a problem with in the past...guess I can attribute that to baking at 350 instead of the usually higher oven temps in other recipes.

I used the fully amount of salt (1-1/2 tsp. for one loaf). Just right for my taste.

I was very concerned about the amount of liquid I used and figured I'd really botched it. Surprisingly it seemed to turn out fine with that amount. The bread has small holes in it like I would expect from bread. Posted Image Thus far I'm come to expect very little from my attempts at gluten free bread but I keep experimenting hoping to come up with a winner. So far this is it.

More experimentation is definitely on the agenda and I'd like to try using some other flours. Thanks for posting the recipe!!!
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Positive Celiac Blood Panel - Dec., 2009
Endoscopy with Positive Biopsy - April 9, 2010
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#15 halfrunner

 
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Posted 27 July 2010 - 05:32 AM

I have been continuing to tweak this bread. The latest batch I tried cutting back the potato starch to 3/4 cup. It seemed lighter in density compared to the previous loaves when I cut it and last night DH told me that it was the best loaf of gluten free bread that he's had.

I may pull the starch amount down a bit more just to see, but 3/4 c. works just fine.

SA, I'm soooo glad that you had good results with this recipe. :D It's nice to know I can help others as well as my hubby.
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