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Beans, Cucumber, Turnips And Cabbage


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20 replies to this topic

#1 Amwilkes

 
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Posted 17 July 2010 - 05:50 AM

I have read several book on Celiac Disease and they say that the following item are gluten free (cabbage, turnips, beans and cucumbers).
In my medical book it say that the above item are rich in Gluten?????
Does anyone or has anyone had similiar controversy.

I am now totally confused as we have been eating the above items as we thought they are gluten free. Can someone shed some light as to which is correct.
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#2 skimomma

 
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Posted 17 July 2010 - 08:18 AM

I have read several book on Celiac Disease and they say that the following item are gluten free (cabbage, turnips, beans and cucumbers).
In my medical book it say that the above item are rich in Gluten?????
Does anyone or has anyone had similiar controversy.

I am now totally confused as we have been eating the above items as we thought they are gluten free. Can someone shed some light as to which is correct.



I am no expert but have read some things that might be useful. I don't think vegetables have gluten, but from a site called Breaking the Vicious Cycle (and book) it says folks with celiac, IBS, crohns, they should avoid them at least for awhile until the gut heals then add as tolerated. If you find the link click on "Elaine" - this lady is amazing and although the tape quality isn't great, I learned a lot from listening. Good luck!
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#3 kareng

 
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Posted 17 July 2010 - 08:35 AM

I have read several book on Celiac Disease and they say that the following item are gluten free (cabbage, turnips, beans and cucumbers).
In my medical book it say that the above item are rich in Gluten?????
Does anyone or has anyone had similiar controversy.

I am now totally confused as we have been eating the above items as we thought they are gluten free. Can someone shed some light as to which is correct.

On the off chance that this is not a joke: are you talking about glutamine? That's an amino acid found in some foods but it's not gluten. Otherwise, I would love to know the source of your info. :)
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Thanksgiving dinners take 18 hours to prepare.  They are consumed in 12 minutes.  Half-times take 12 minutes.  This is not a coincidence.  - Emma Bombeck
 
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#4 Skylark

 
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Posted 17 July 2010 - 01:16 PM

There is no gluten in vegetables. Maybe you are misunderstanding the book?
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#5 GlutenFreeManna

 
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Posted 17 July 2010 - 01:29 PM

What "medical book" are you reading? :huh:
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#6 Juliebove

 
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Posted 18 July 2010 - 07:10 PM

I don't think those things have gluten. Corn has gluten. But it is not the same type of gluten that a celiac has to avoid.
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#7 Travisevian

 
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Posted 03 September 2010 - 05:58 PM

Corn has gluten.


Corn does not have gluten.
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#8 Skylark

 
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Posted 03 September 2010 - 07:09 PM

Corn does not have gluten.

Depends on your definition of "gluten". Corn has a prolamine (gluten-like) protein called zein that celiacs don't react to. Like other prolamines, it can be difficult to digest.
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#9 Travisevian

 
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Posted 10 September 2010 - 07:24 PM

Depends on your definition of "gluten". Corn has a prolamine (gluten-like) protein called zein that celiacs don't react to. Like other prolamines, it can be difficult to digest.


With respect, "gluten-like" isn't the same thing as gluten.
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#10 Skylark

 
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Posted 10 September 2010 - 07:37 PM

With respect, "gluten-like" isn't the same thing as gluten.

If you want to argue strict semantics, gluten is a very general term for the insoluble protein component of grains. I said "guten-like" to avoid confusing people here but corn absolutely has gluten by the cereal science definition of the word.

Corn gluten is composed of zein rather than glutenin and gliadin so it is not a problem for celiacs. With somewhat less respect, learn your cereal prolamins if you're going to argue.

Ravenwoodglass already suggested you take care with your attitude here in another thread. I am seconding her suggestion.
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#11 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 11 September 2010 - 04:03 AM

With respect, "gluten-like" isn't the same thing as gluten.

Corn does have gluten. It is used in animal feed and pesticides. It is however different from the gluten found in wheat, rye and barley, which is what celiacs react to. As far as I know corn gluten is not used in human food. Some people do have an intolerance to corn though.

http://www.ehow.com/...orn-gluten.html

Corn gluten is a natural byproduct of processed corn, and is found in farm-animal feed and pet foods


http://en.wikipedia....orn_gluten_meal

Corn gluten meal (often simply called CGM) is a byproduct of corn (maize) processing that has historically been used as an animal feed. It can also be used as an organic herbicide.

http://www.ehow.com/...rn-gluten_.html

Corn gluten is made up of 60 percent corn protein. It is a byproduct of a process referred to as wet-milling. Enzyme hydrolysis of corn gluten meal creates hydrolyzed corn gluten
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"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#12 GFinDC

 
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Posted 11 September 2010 - 11:10 AM

The term gluten can be confusing since we use it routinely here with the implied understanding that it means the gluten found in wheat, rye and barley grains. But gluten in general is a protein and carbohydrate molecule found in grains. The specific gluten molecule in wheat has a protein component called gliaden, which makes us sick. The protein in a barley grain gluten molecule is call hordein. The protein in a rye gluten molecule is called, heck I don't remember. But anyway, gluten is really a general term for protein-carbohydrate molecules in grain seeds, including corn. The gluten that affects us is found in wheat, rye, barley and for some oats.

This is not the first time people have been confused by this on the board, there have been other threads about the issue. Seems like there is always something to learn with this disease. :)
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Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul

#13 DBSNJ

 
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Posted 24 August 2013 - 03:49 PM

Seams like there are some knowledgeable people here, so I am going to reiterate this persons question with some additional information.

I started looking into a gluten free diet and was immediately confused...

 

If you do a search for "beans cabbage turnips cucumbers gluten", you will see all over the internet, the following definition:

 

Diet prescribed to treat celiac disease; eliminates such foods as wheat and rye and oats and beans and cabbage and turnips and cucumbers that are rich in gluten

 

But then of course if you look around you find all of these tomato and cucumber salads that claim to be gluten free.

 

Now I realize this it the internet but which statement is true...

 

The internet is great until it isn't!!!!


Edited by DBSNJ, 24 August 2013 - 03:55 PM.

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#14 kareng

 
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Posted 24 August 2013 - 03:54 PM

Seams like there are some knowledgeable people here, so I am going to reiterate this persons question with some additional information.

I started looking into a gluten free diet and was immediately confused...

 

If you do a search for beans and cabbage and turnips and cucumbers that are rich in gluten, you will see all over the internet, the following definition:

 

Diet prescribed to treat celiac disease; eliminates such foods as wheat and rye and oats and beans and cabbage and turnips and cucumbers that are rich in gluten

 

But then of course if you look around you find all of these tomato and cucumber salads that claim to be gluten free.

 

Now I realize this it the internet but which statement is true...

 

The internet is great until it isn't!!!!

 

 

We have a rule on this forum, if you are going to tell us some info that isn't widely known, you need to provide some reliable sources to prove it.  I have never seen any reliable source saying that beans, cabbage, turnips and cucumbers have gluten.

 

Gluten is a protein found in grain which is the seed of a grass type plant.  None of these other foods are even related to wheat, rye or barley.

 

Please provide your sources.


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Thanksgiving dinners take 18 hours to prepare.  They are consumed in 12 minutes.  Half-times take 12 minutes.  This is not a coincidence.  - Emma Bombeck
 
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#15 kareng

 
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Posted 24 August 2013 - 03:59 PM

http://www.curecelia...guide/treatment  

 

"A well-balanced diet

A gluten-free diet means avoiding all foods that contain wheat (including spelt, triticale, and kamut), rye, and barley, and their derivatives. Despite these restrictions, you can still eat a well-balanced diet with a variety of foods, including gluten-free bread and pasta. For example, instead of wheat flour, use potato, rice, soy, corn, or bean flour. Fresh meat, fish, rice, fruits, and vegetables do not contain gluten, so you can eat as much of these foods as you

want."

 

 

The link I gave is to the University of Chicago Celiac Center.  They have a lot of easy to read info there.


Edited by kareng, 24 August 2013 - 04:28 PM.

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Thanksgiving dinners take 18 hours to prepare.  They are consumed in 12 minutes.  Half-times take 12 minutes.  This is not a coincidence.  - Emma Bombeck
 
dancing-turkey.gif
 
 
 
 

 





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