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Beans, Cucumber, Turnips And Cabbage
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I have read several book on Celiac Disease and they say that the following item are gluten free (cabbage, turnips, beans and cucumbers).

In my medical book it say that the above item are rich in Gluten?????

Does anyone or has anyone had similiar controversy.

I am now totally confused as we have been eating the above items as we thought they are gluten free. Can someone shed some light as to which is correct.

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I have read several book on Celiac Disease and they say that the following item are gluten free (cabbage, turnips, beans and cucumbers).

In my medical book it say that the above item are rich in Gluten?????

Does anyone or has anyone had similiar controversy.

I am now totally confused as we have been eating the above items as we thought they are gluten free. Can someone shed some light as to which is correct.

I am no expert but have read some things that might be useful. I don't think vegetables have gluten, but from a site called Breaking the Vicious Cycle (and book) it says folks with celiac, IBS, crohns, they should avoid them at least for awhile until the gut heals then add as tolerated. If you find the link click on "Elaine" - this lady is amazing and although the tape quality isn't great, I learned a lot from listening. Good luck!

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I have read several book on Celiac Disease and they say that the following item are gluten free (cabbage, turnips, beans and cucumbers).

In my medical book it say that the above item are rich in Gluten?????

Does anyone or has anyone had similiar controversy.

I am now totally confused as we have been eating the above items as we thought they are gluten free. Can someone shed some light as to which is correct.

On the off chance that this is not a joke: are you talking about glutamine? That's an amino acid found in some foods but it's not gluten. Otherwise, I would love to know the source of your info. :)

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There is no gluten in vegetables. Maybe you are misunderstanding the book?

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What "medical book" are you reading? :huh:

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I don't think those things have gluten. Corn has gluten. But it is not the same type of gluten that a celiac has to avoid.

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Corn does not have gluten.

Depends on your definition of "gluten". Corn has a prolamine (gluten-like) protein called zein that celiacs don't react to. Like other prolamines, it can be difficult to digest.

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Depends on your definition of "gluten". Corn has a prolamine (gluten-like) protein called zein that celiacs don't react to. Like other prolamines, it can be difficult to digest.

With respect, "gluten-like" isn't the same thing as gluten.

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With respect, "gluten-like" isn't the same thing as gluten.

If you want to argue strict semantics, gluten is a very general term for the insoluble protein component of grains. I said "guten-like" to avoid confusing people here but corn absolutely has gluten by the cereal science definition of the word.

Corn gluten is composed of zein rather than glutenin and gliadin so it is not a problem for celiacs. With somewhat less respect, learn your cereal prolamins if you're going to argue.

Ravenwoodglass already suggested you take care with your attitude here in another thread. I am seconding her suggestion.

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With respect, "gluten-like" isn't the same thing as gluten.

Corn does have gluten. It is used in animal feed and pesticides. It is however different from the gluten found in wheat, rye and barley, which is what celiacs react to. As far as I know corn gluten is not used in human food. Some people do have an intolerance to corn though.

http://www.ehow.com/about_4674697_corn-gluten.html

Corn gluten is a natural byproduct of processed corn, and is found in farm-animal feed and pet foods

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corn_gluten_meal

Corn gluten meal (often simply called CGM) is a byproduct of corn (maize) processing that has historically been used as an animal feed. It can also be used as an organic herbicide.

http://www.ehow.com/facts_5911433_hydrolyzed-corn-gluten_.html

Corn gluten is made up of 60 percent corn protein. It is a byproduct of a process referred to as wet-milling. Enzyme hydrolysis of corn gluten meal creates hydrolyzed corn gluten

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The term gluten can be confusing since we use it routinely here with the implied understanding that it means the gluten found in wheat, rye and barley grains. But gluten in general is a protein and carbohydrate molecule found in grains. The specific gluten molecule in wheat has a protein component called gliaden, which makes us sick. The protein in a barley grain gluten molecule is call hordein. The protein in a rye gluten molecule is called, heck I don't remember. But anyway, gluten is really a general term for protein-carbohydrate molecules in grain seeds, including corn. The gluten that affects us is found in wheat, rye, barley and for some oats.

This is not the first time people have been confused by this on the board, there have been other threads about the issue. Seems like there is always something to learn with this disease. :)

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Seams like there are some knowledgeable people here, so I am going to reiterate this persons question with some additional information.

I started looking into a gluten free diet and was immediately confused...

 

If you do a search for "beans cabbage turnips cucumbers gluten", you will see all over the internet, the following definition:

 

Diet prescribed to treat celiac disease; eliminates such foods as wheat and rye and oats and beans and cabbage and turnips and cucumbers that are rich in gluten

 

But then of course if you look around you find all of these tomato and cucumber salads that claim to be gluten free.

 

Now I realize this it the internet but which statement is true...

 

The internet is great until it isn't!!!!

Edited by DBSNJ
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Seams like there are some knowledgeable people here, so I am going to reiterate this persons question with some additional information.

I started looking into a gluten free diet and was immediately confused...

 

If you do a search for beans and cabbage and turnips and cucumbers that are rich in gluten, you will see all over the internet, the following definition:

 

Diet prescribed to treat celiac disease; eliminates such foods as wheat and rye and oats and beans and cabbage and turnips and cucumbers that are rich in gluten

 

But then of course if you look around you find all of these tomato and cucumber salads that claim to be gluten free.

 

Now I realize this it the internet but which statement is true...

 

The internet is great until it isn't!!!!

 

 

We have a rule on this forum, if you are going to tell us some info that isn't widely known, you need to provide some reliable sources to prove it.  I have never seen any reliable source saying that beans, cabbage, turnips and cucumbers have gluten.

 

Gluten is a protein found in grain which is the seed of a grass type plant.  None of these other foods are even related to wheat, rye or barley.

 

Please provide your sources.

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http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/living-with-celiac/guide/treatment  

 

"A well-balanced diet

A gluten-free diet means avoiding all foods that contain wheat (including spelt, triticale, and kamut), rye, and barley, and their derivatives. Despite these restrictions, you can still eat a well-balanced diet with a variety of foods, including gluten-free bread and pasta. For example, instead of wheat flour, use potato, rice, soy, corn, or bean flour. Fresh meat, fish, rice, fruits, and vegetables do not contain gluten, so you can eat as much of these foods as you

want."

 

 

The link I gave is to the University of Chicago Celiac Center.  They have a lot of easy to read info there.

Edited by kareng
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We have a rule on this forum, if you are going to tell us some info that isn't widely known, you need to provide some reliable sources to prove it.  I have never seen any reliable source saying that beans, cabbage, turnips and cucumbers have gluten.

 

Gluten is a protein found in grain which is the seed of a grass type plant.  None of these other foods are even related to wheat, rye or barley.

 

Please provide your sources.

Wow!! Thanks. I guess I'll just move on since this forum is so touchy. 

 

If you were to actually read my post, I was not trying to state a fact I was ASKING a question.

I did provide the source of my confusion, all you had to do was a search on the terms I included in my post. If you do that you will see many many definitions with the statement I posted.

I was just trying to get someone to either refute or verify which is correct.

Other posters on this thread stated that the original poster may have misunderstood what he was reading, I am just providing yet again another example of where this same statement is made.

If it is not true or inaccurate that is fine, but the  misleading information is out there in more then one spot, hence my confusion and my question, which I feel is legitimate. 

As I said, I understand this is the internet and therefore thing may be incorrect but there are so many sites with the same statement , it makes you wonder.

That was the point of my post. I never once claimed that either statement was correct or not

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Wow!! Thanks. I guess I'll just move on since this forum is so touchy. 

 

If you were to actually read my post, I was not trying to state a fact I was ASKING a question.

I did provide the source of my confusion, all you had to do was a search on the terms I included in my post. If you do that you will see many many definitions with the statement I posted.

I was just trying to get someone to either refute or verify which is correct.

Other posters on this thread stated that the original poster may have misunderstood what he was reading, I am just providing yet again another example of where this same statement is made.

If it is not true or inaccurate that is fine, but the  misleading information is out there in more then one spot, hence my confusion and my question, which I feel is legitimate. 

As I said, I understand this is the internet and therefore thing may be incorrect but there are so many sites with the same statement , it makes you wonder.

That was the point of my post. I never once claimed that either statement was correct or not

 

 

The original question was from 3 years ago and was answered.  The internet has lots of great info, but I have found no reliable medical or scientific sites that make these claims.  There are sites and blogs and other nonsense on the internet that will tell you how to grow bigger boobs, loose 30 pounds in 3 days, and other stuff.  We like to deal in facts here and not spread any internet falsehoods.  If you have seen this on a reliable site, please let us know.  It is either a new discovery or a mistake on their site that they would want to know about.

 

 

Just googled that phrase  - not a single reliable site.  Some sites that look like they have translated to English incorrectly and are trying to give a definition or use that bad definition.

 

The link I gave is to the University of Chicago Celiac Center.  They have a lot of easy to read info there

Edited by kareng
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well,  I googled that combo of words and got this below and I

sure would like to know who the hell composed THIS stupid

definition

on "dictionary.com"?

source called WordNet.3.0 by Princeton University?? :blink:

 

check it out. THIS IS SO WRONG!!

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/gluten-free+diet

 

 

gluten-free diet
noun

diet prescribed to treat celiac disease; eliminates such foods as

wheat and rye and oats and beans and cabbage and turnips and

cucumbers that are rich in gluten

WordNet® 3.0, © 2006 by Princeton University. 
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well,  I googled that combo of words and got this below and I

sure would like to know who the hell composed THIS stupid

definition

on "dictionary.com"?

source called WordNet.3.0 by Princeton University?? :blink:

 

check it out. THIS IS SO WRONG!!

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/gluten-free+diet

 

 

gluten-free diet

noun

diet prescribed to treat celiac disease; eliminates such foods as

wheat and rye and oats and beans and cabbage and turnips and

cucumbers that are rich in gluten

WordNet® 3.0, © 2006 by Princeton University.

And who takes their medical advice from an Internet dictionary?

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And who take their medical advice from an Internet dictionary?

 

Some people may, unfortunately. <_< 

 

I do not............. nor do I recommend that.

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Well...I went to the Princeton Word net and tried to get gluten free and gluten. It only gives a correct definition for the word gluten ( but not as it applies to a Celiac diet) and no gluten-free diet definition. It may have been fixed since 2006 or even be misquoted. Still more reason to get info from reliable sources.

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