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When You Travel


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21 replies to this topic

#16 anabananakins

 
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Posted 07 November 2010 - 12:10 AM

I spent four weeks travelling around the states. Sometimes in hotels, sometimes with friends, travel mostly by train.

I always had a food bag with me, it's contents varied. I kept rice cakes and larabars for emergencies, but barely touched them. Chex was awesome, I could eat it dry on the train or with milk and I enjoyed it even when I was feeling awful from a previous glutening. Carry a bunch of ziplock bags, they are handy for left overs (such as went I was running low on chex and wanted to ditch the big box) or to divide up a large bag of nuts into smaller servings for your purse. I also had a knife, a chopping board, a plastic bowl and plate (ikea kids ones) and a vege peeler. Oh and I had to buy a can opener so next time I'll take one of those.
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#17 nowheatpete

 
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Posted 08 November 2010 - 04:21 AM

I guess that 2nd website is not in this forums good books then?

Toaster bags are deinitely a good option. Also if you stick to basic things like cheese and fresh fruit you will avoid being glutened.

I found this blog http://glutenfreetraveller.com about travelling with gluten a list of links here http://www.Lame Advertisement.de/eng/use/travel all related to travelling with food allergies.


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#18 Lostfalls

 
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Posted 08 November 2010 - 02:18 PM

Something no one has mentioned - along with Imodium, Tylenol and Pepcid AC for accidental glutening, I also pack some enzymes I got from Super Supplements called "Gluten Free" supposedly when taken before a meal they break down the gluten before it reaches your small intestines, it also has enzymes to help break down lactose and something else too, I can't remember... but its affordable so I always keep some on hand and even when eating off of a "gluten free menu" i will take it. I have never gotten "sick" while taking "Gluten Free" but I have found that while it spared me from an evening in the bathroom, it did not spare me from the bloating, exhaustion, and migraine headache that i usually experience when I have been glutened, so use at your own risk. I was grateful not to spend the night in the bathroom, but now know to be prepared to deal with my other symptoms. One of my jobs when I travel for work is arranging dinners with clients so I can't always just politely skip dinner, I participate as safely as I can.....
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#19 MegRie

 
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Posted 10 November 2010 - 08:39 AM

The actual "traveling" part is what I think is the hardest. I try to take several things that are high in protien to help me stay feeling full. It sucks when you are surrounded by resteraunts you can't eat at and you are starving.... Here's my must have list.
Lara Bars
Horizon milk cartons- don't have to be refrigerated and I looovve them
cheese
Fruit
Gluten-Free beef sticks
and a can of Gluten-Free soup in case you arrive late and don't feel like cooking.
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#20 K-Dawg

 
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Posted 19 November 2010 - 01:13 PM

Hey there:

1) Pre-plan -- I look up a whole foods as I know I can get gluten-free food and snacks. I have vacationed several times and the pre-planning saves me. I travel with a binder with the addresses of the Whole Foods (from state to state) and gluten-free restaurants (and locations of fast food places I can eat at for the road trip...Wendy's or Outback, etc)

2) Snacks - I bring my own snacks. Always. For flight, it's cheese, crackers, trail mix, a pizza (that I cook at home..I like cold pizza mid-flight).

3) I always book a resort with a full kitchen -- I clean the pans (scour) them OR I buy my own. Note of caution - be careful with convection ovens. If I can't get a full kitchen, just a kitchenette, I'll buy a hot plate from a hardware store, usually with 2 burners and a really cheap toaster oven. YOu can cook ANYTHING in a toaster oven!! I just leave them at the hotel.

4) I sometimes pack (in my suitcase) my fav corn pasta! MMMMMMMMM

5) Toaster bags (in case I can't find a toaster oven..yes, it has happened)

Good luck and have fun

KDawg

I'm traveling for the first time as a celiac. I was wondering some of your "must haves" when you travel. From food to other products. It's 6 hours away, so I'm bring what I feel I need and my personal products as a first timer. Do any of you bring your toaster etc?


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Many autoimmune disorders: Graves Disease in 1998, Psoriasis on or about 2000, Hashimoto's in 2008.

Severely anemic in 2007 (undetectable iron levels)

Elevated liver enzymes (ALT and AST) as of October 2008.

Negative blood test for celiac disease in February 2009, followed by diagnosis of celiac disease in April 2009 after positive biopsy.

#21 K-Dawg

 
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Posted 19 November 2010 - 01:15 PM

PS -- sometimes it's easy (e.g. New York city -- so many gluten-free or gluten-free Friendly restaurants...no need to spend big bucks on room with kitchen...just got a reg hotel room and paid the extra $ for a mini fridge where I kept snacks (like camp food) so taht I could hike around all day and not worry
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Many autoimmune disorders: Graves Disease in 1998, Psoriasis on or about 2000, Hashimoto's in 2008.

Severely anemic in 2007 (undetectable iron levels)

Elevated liver enzymes (ALT and AST) as of October 2008.

Negative blood test for celiac disease in February 2009, followed by diagnosis of celiac disease in April 2009 after positive biopsy.

#22 Tina B

 
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Posted 25 November 2010 - 06:23 PM

I agree. When I go to Europe, it's so easy to be gluten-free. High awareness and most people speak English also...at least in the cities, where I tend to stay. I can't speak for all of Europe but western Europe is easy. I do carry some snacks on board the plane, in case there are delays, but other than that, I wing it. Haven't had a problem or gotten sick yet.


DITTO!!!!!! I DO NOT LET THIS RUN MY LIFE. 20 years ago my duodenal biopsy came back "severe celiac disease" and my common sense approach has worked since then. I cant even imagine bringing toasters, coolers, cookware etc. What a drag that would be and not just for me but for anyone who was traveling with me. If I don' eat any bread so what. There are plenty of other things to eat.
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Gluten free since 1990.
Diagnosed by duodenal biopsy.

You don't stop skiing because you get old. You get old because you stop skiing :-)




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