Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
* * * * * 1 votes

Can I Eat Sushi?


  • Please log in to reply

25 replies to this topic

#16 Kate79

 
Kate79

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 145 posts
 

Posted 05 December 2011 - 10:01 AM

Some kinds of wasabi paste have wheat flour; others don't. I don't know about that particular brand, but Whole Foods carries a type that doesn't have gluten - don't remember the name so check the labels. I've mixed up my own wasabi paste before and brought it with me, along with my gluten-free soy sauce.
  • 1

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#17 Kntrygrl

 
Kntrygrl

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
 

Posted 05 December 2011 - 10:14 AM

I have a terrible time finding rolls that don't have gluten. It's in the fake crab, tempura batter, in most of the cooked fish like eel or salmon skin, and in the sauces they tend to drizzle over them.

I order either nigiri sushi (the fish on a block of rice) or sashimi and make sure they understand that I am "allergic" to soy sauce.



Thank you!
  • 0
"Aspire to inspire before you expire"

Gluten free since August 2011
Misdiagnosed with IBS for 15 years
vitamin deficiencies, female problems, neuropathy of both arms, history of migraines, insomniac since birth of son in 1998, depression (mild), mood swings, deep joint pain/ache that would not go away, daily headaches.
Confirmed diagnosis of lymphocytic colitis by microscopic biopsy in August 2011, negative blood test for celiac disease in August 2011, however, symptoms disappeared when started gluten-free diet.

#18 Skylark

 
Skylark

    Glutenologist

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,490 posts
 

Posted 05 December 2011 - 10:45 AM

By the way, San-J makes packets of gluten-free tamari sauce you can bring with you to sushi bars. I find them at a local health food store.
http://www.san-j.com..._info.asp?id=26
  • 0

#19 Kntrygrl

 
Kntrygrl

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
 

Posted 05 December 2011 - 11:19 AM

By the way, San-J makes packets of gluten-free tamari sauce you can bring with you to sushi bars. I find them at a local health food store.
http://www.san-j.com..._info.asp?id=26



That's awesome!
  • 0
"Aspire to inspire before you expire"

Gluten free since August 2011
Misdiagnosed with IBS for 15 years
vitamin deficiencies, female problems, neuropathy of both arms, history of migraines, insomniac since birth of son in 1998, depression (mild), mood swings, deep joint pain/ache that would not go away, daily headaches.
Confirmed diagnosis of lymphocytic colitis by microscopic biopsy in August 2011, negative blood test for celiac disease in August 2011, however, symptoms disappeared when started gluten-free diet.

#20 tomutomu

 
tomutomu

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
 

Posted 09 December 2012 - 05:58 PM

I'm going to be the odd one and say that you cannot eat sushi. Although the end product looks simple, there is a plethora of ingredients in sushi. On top of this, the cheaper you go or the further away you are from a source of seafood, the more ingredients are used in order to compensate for the lack of flavour in fish that isn't fresh.

I have been living in Japan for the past two and a half years in a region renowned for its seafood and, subsequently, its sushi and sashimi. Unfortunately after being sick for months I did some research into sushi and found out that most of it is not gluten free.

Nori (seaweed) is usually flavoured. This is typically with MSG. Although MSG is gluten free in North America (bacterial fermentation), in Japan and China MSG is sometimes still derived from gluten. If your chef is using nori imported from either of these countries, it may not be safe. Unfortunately MSG is rarely labelled as MSG and is therefore hard to spot.

Su (rice vinegar) also contains wheat at times.

I have been off sushi for about 3 months now and, as hard as it is, I have never felt better.

Do not assume that if you can find gluten free rice vinegar in your supermarket, it means your local sushi chef is using something similar. Chefs will often use imported items that do not contain the same ingredients.
  • 0

#21 Takala

 
Takala

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,555 posts
 

Posted 10 December 2012 - 10:38 AM

Well, it doesn't seem fair to try to taint the restaurants here in North America that do manage to serve gluten free sushi, just because the Japanese restaurants and vendors in Japan don't do well with the concept of "gluten free" and sourcing their ingredients. We do have rudimentary labeling laws here in the USA for the eight major allergens (one of which is wheat) which must be declared on packaged product labels, so that is not perfect, but something. This means that a rice vinegar made with wheat has to be labeled as such here, even if it is imported, or the FDA will recall it as soon as the problem is discovered and brought to their attention.

I predict that, in the future, because of the year 2010 tsunami and nuclear tragedy which will be causing a lot of thyroid problems, one result will be that the Japanese food labeling regulations just might become more attentive to items containing gluten, because by then it really will matter for a greater number of Japanese consumers.
  • 0

#22 idonteatwheat

 
idonteatwheat

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 25 posts
 

Posted 10 December 2012 - 10:59 AM

As far as the rice is concerned you have to know the type of vinegar they use with it. I've been glutened with just a rice bowl and sashimi, turns out they were using a vinegar made for sushi rice and it had some barley syrup as a sweetner.
  • 0

#23 Chaff

 
Chaff

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 108 posts
 

Posted 27 December 2012 - 08:56 PM

Nori (seaweed) is usually flavoured. This is typically with MSG. Although MSG is gluten free in North America (bacterial fermentation), in Japan and China MSG is sometimes still derived from gluten. If your chef is using nori imported from either of these countries, it may not be safe. Unfortunately MSG is rarely labelled as MSG and is therefore hard to spot.

Su (rice vinegar) also contains wheat at times.

Do not assume that if you can find gluten free rice vinegar in your supermarket, it means your local sushi chef is using something similar. Chefs will often use imported items that do not contain the same ingredients.


That's helpful -- I also live in Japan, so sushi is everywhere. I suspect some chirashi on plain rice should be OK, like a maguro-don ordered without any sauces on top (Japanese mayo has something bad in it...I don't know what, but it's probably one of my million non-gluten food intolerances).

For folks not in Japan, it's still worth knowing, as tomutomu points out: if you have any Japanese friends or anyone who makes sushi at home who has a connection to East Asia, they may serve you sushi with these ingredients. Also, in big cities like New York and LA, they may be importing their ingredients, too. Doesn't hurt to be aware of Japanese food market standards.

Between tomutomu's post and idonteatwheat's on the barley syrup, I have to say that I am now slightly terrified to eat out in Japan. I just have one Indian place that I know to be totally safe and one Okinawan taco rice restaurant I trust.

I think I'll just down a rice cake on the way over, order only a glass of wine, and then eat at home if I have to go anywhere else.

One thing I didn't notice mentioned here was the usual complaint about sushi places: cross-contamination. There are no dedicated gluten-free bamboo rollers or mats at any sushi place I've ever been, and there are tempura crumbs and soy sauce drips everywhere. I'd been just ordering kappa maki and crossing my fingers, but I'm convinced now to just leave well enough alone.
  • 0

celiac, hypothyroid, hereditary hemochromatosis
 


#24 kenlove

 
kenlove

    Advanced Community Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,815 posts
 

Posted 27 December 2012 - 09:55 PM

SOmetimes its the seaweed. Much of the cheaper Korean seaweed is process in soy sauce making it really rotten for us.

The only rolls I get -- when the nori (seaweeh is good) are the oshinko ( pickles) and cucumber or natto rolls.
  • 0
"Ryo tatereba mi ga tatanu"

If we try to serve both sides, we cannot stand our own ground.

Japanese proverb

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#25 scenicgurl

 
scenicgurl

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
 

Posted 09 March 2013 - 05:40 AM

I have a terrible time finding rolls that don't have gluten. It's in the fake crab, tempura batter, in most of the cooked fish like eel or salmon skin, and in the sauces they tend to drizzle over them.

I order either nigiri sushi (the fish on a block of rice) or sashimi and make sure they understand that I am "allergic" to soy sauce.

I've found, when I want sushi at home, places like whole foods are the best for helping me out. They make it order as well as have several already there waiting. The majority of them aren't breaded and don't have sauce. It's about $7 a roll so it's not robbery and considering how you know you won't get sick I'm ok with that.


  • 0

Caffine free since 2008

Pescetarian since 2009

Diagnosed as gluten intolerant Oct 2011, have been gluten free ever since

 

 


#26 kenlove

 
kenlove

    Advanced Community Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,815 posts
 

Posted 22 March 2013 - 08:25 AM

Thats about all we can hope for although sometimes you can order unagi or anago shioyaki -- just  salt. 

 

ko mugi ( pronounced ko mu gee) allergy ( aruegee) should help them  figure it out

 

I have a terrible time finding rolls that don't have gluten. It's in the fake crab, tempura batter, in most of the cooked fish like eel or salmon skin, and in the sauces they tend to drizzle over them.

I order either nigiri sushi (the fish on a block of rice) or sashimi and make sure they understand that I am "allergic" to soy sauce.


  • 0
"Ryo tatereba mi ga tatanu"

If we try to serve both sides, we cannot stand our own ground.

Japanese proverb

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: