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Who's Job Is It To Know What's Gf


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24 replies to this topic

#16 Guest_gfinnebraska_*

 
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Posted 08 June 2005 - 05:51 AM

I agree with connole1056 ~ we are adults. When an "adult" wants to change, they will. I know for me, when I want to do something I do it. IF I don't want to, I don't. Plain and simple. Life is choices. We all have fee will and make choices daily... living gluten-free is just choosing wisely and learning daily. :)
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#17 lovegrov

 
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Posted 08 June 2005 - 06:04 AM

I'll try to remember to look up and post my favorite rub. You can find all kinds online with a search. The one already posted here is a good basic one, although I always include paprika in mine. Other good additions include cumin, garlic powder, onion powder, red pepper (not too much, and white pepper, which, believe it or not, hits different taste buds than black or red pepper.

richard
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#18 connole1056

 
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Posted 08 June 2005 - 08:53 AM

I think cdford made some very good points. I had not thought of things that way. Thanks for bringing up those points.
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#19 cdford

 
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Posted 10 June 2005 - 12:42 AM

You are welcome. These things really came to light when I became soooo sick and others had to take over my responsibilities. The one good thing that came out of it was a new appreciation for the load I had carried around the house! I thought everyone was going to go hungry for the first few days because nobody even thought about supper until it was time to eat and then it was too late to start most stuff. We have rearranged the responsibilities now to better meet our current needs. I still wound up with the researcher position because I enjoy it and will actually complete the task.
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Donna
South Georgia
9 yrs gluten-free
...also DH, fibromyalgia, neuropathy, osteopenia, hypothyroid...

After almost 10 years, I am doing soooo much better!

#20 egardner

 
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Posted 12 June 2005 - 07:16 AM

I was wondering, do you guys have any good ideas as to how to get relatives with similar symptoms to be tested? I know I cant make anyone do anything, but I worry that when it is diagnosed it will be too late, such as cancer. My cousin and aunt have always had identical sympotoms and when I told them I was positive, they were sympathetic but dont quite seem to understand it is probably what they have to. My cousin actually said she didnt want to know because she didnt want to have to eat that way. Maybe I should just let it go, but I worry for them.
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#21 KaitiUSA

 
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Posted 12 June 2005 - 07:34 AM

The only thing to do is present them with the information that it is genetic and if ignored then they are 40-100 times more likely to develop cancer and other disabling things. It knocks an average of 10 years off of your life.
After you have given them this information all you can do is hope they listen. My mom and dad both were tested right away but my extended family(about 6 or 7 have symptoms)will not get tested and do not see the need to. This is very bothersome to me but I can't force them to do anything. I hope nothing happens to them but I am afraid something really serious will have to happen with them before they will get tested. My uncle has almost every single symptom I had too.

I hope it all works out for the best...and as long as you gave them the info you did what you can do...they have to decide how they will use that info.
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Kaiti
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Gluten-free since January 2004
Arkansas

Jeremiah 29:11- "For I know the plans that I have for you, declares the Lord, plans for you to prosper and not harm you,plans to give you a hope and future"

"One Nation, Under God"

Feel free to email me anytime....jkbrodbent@yahoo.com

#22 egardner

 
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Posted 12 June 2005 - 12:21 PM

Thanks Kaiti, you are right. At least I can rest easy knowing I have informed them of the risks. It is tough knowing what could happen, but it is in thier hands now.
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#23 connole1056

 
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Posted 12 June 2005 - 03:55 PM

I agree completely with Kati. I did want to add that if they are open to hearing it you could explain what symtoms you believe they have that are similar yours and mention how they have gone away. You might hit on a symptom of theirs that is bothering them to such an extent that they feel it might be worth getting it "fixed" by going gluten-free. You seem really nice to be so conserned for others who are not taking your advice. It can be hard. When my daughter was diagnosed I did not want to get tested because I could not imagine going on the diet, so I do know what your relatives are saying! However, I did break down because I thought it was important.
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#24 gf4life

 
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Posted 12 June 2005 - 07:42 PM

Going back to the original topic here,

My husband is the only one in the family that is not gluten-free. But I feel that he still needs to be aware of the ins and outs of the diet, since he is occasionally left with the kids at meal times and needs to know how to handle it. At home it is usually okay, since the kids know what to eat (before they were well educated on the diet, he would occasionally give them "bites" of his food because he "didn't realise that cake had wheat!"). It is when he takes the kids out that there has been problems.

We occasionally eat at El Pollo Loco, but the kids and I only get the plain grilled chicken. It is the only item the company states is gluten-free, and not contaminated. So when my husband took our 9 year old out of town to a doctors appointment, instead of feeding him the lunch I packed, he took him to get some chicken. He got him a kids meal instead and let him eat the fries. Afterward when I saw the kids meal bag I freaked! He said he thought the fries were okay since we eat fries at McDonald's! I have told him at least a dozen time that the fries there weren't safe. Why else would we have gotten chicken there and then gone to McD's for fries afterwards!?! Just to make a second trip!?!? Anyhow, I love my husband dearly, but he is clueless on the gluten issue. He just bought a whole case of 30 See's assorted lollypops that none of us can eat... :huh:

God bless,
Mariann
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~West Coast-Central California~

Mariann, gluten intolerant and mother of 3 gluten intolerant children

#25 connole1056

 
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Posted 12 June 2005 - 09:38 PM

My husband is gulity of the same thing your husband is. He assumes since one french fry is okay, all french fries are okay. Tonight I was very surprised when he asked our waiter if the fries were cooked in a dedicated fryer though, so that is progress! Sometimes I think it will take a bad reaction from out daughter to make sure he does not forget to ask questions. Basically all that can be done is educate him and hope takes it in. Of course he is responsible for his child's welfare, but I think it is easier for him to lay it on me. Since I do not work it does fall to me to do the research about food. I do e-mail him things sometimes so he cannot say he doesn't know. Maybe when your husband starts hearing from your children, he will educate himself. I know my husband gets embarrassed when our daughter tells him he is wrong! Then he asks me if the food is gluten-free to see if she is right! However, I do think it is the responsibility of both parents since it is a medical issue. It is not like splitting up chores. It is something both parents HAVE to know.
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