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"But You Can Eat Whole Wheat, Right?"


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#106 i-geek

 
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Posted 12 August 2010 - 07:50 PM

Really? I thought Spelt was just another (older) form of wheat. I thought I saw someone with a wheat allergy post here that they reacted to spelt, so I guess that's where I got confused. Thanks for the info.


It's a varietal of wheat, but not the same species as common wheat(or sub-species; there appears to be some confusion). Some of the proteins in the two species will be identical and someone who reacts to those proteins in common wheat will also react to spelt. However, some of the proteins will be different, and someone who reacts to a protein that is only in common wheat will not react to spelt.
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#107 psawyer

 
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Posted 12 August 2010 - 08:27 PM

Spelt contains gluten. It is not identical to modern wheat, but neither is barley or rye. Celiacs must avoid all forms of gluten, including spelt.
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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

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#108 srall

 
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Posted 13 August 2010 - 05:17 AM

These are so funny. I'm brand new to this board but I can completely relate to this thread. I realized through an elimination diet in March of this year that I'm extremely gluten intolerant and I've also given up dairy which bothers me too. (May re-introduce wheat to get a celiac's diagnosis as I have many classic symptoms but am dreading the process).

Anyhow, I have been scrambling myself to figure out what is safe and not safe (never thought about make up...will have to research that next)

Anytime I travel or eat out I panic...I realize that nobody but me can be trusted when it comes to what foods are safe for me. In a hotel restaurant in Rhode Island I was already crashing from something I ate and was really struggling. There was a risotto on the menu and I asked the waitress to ask the chef if it was dairy free and if there was any soy sauce. I had already learned not to trust the servers. She comes back and says no soy sauce and dairy free. Risotto comes out...in a cheese sauce, which I discovered after taking a big bite. They did comp my meal.

I too have been asked many of the same questions :"You CAN eat white bread though?" and "What do you eat then?"

Honestly I'm eating 100% healthier since I've had to take control of my diet.
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#109 K8ling

 
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Posted 13 August 2010 - 09:37 AM

I'm having trouble accepting that my son won't eat as well as I can feed him at school. I am going to start sending him lunch, but since being diagnosed we eat SO healthy. Then he goes to school. I took him to school at lunch time today and saw what they were feeding him...and oh goodness. It made me wish I had fed him before he went to school. Being a Celiac has made everyone in my family healthier.
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Diagnosed with Gluten Allergy April 2010. Family history of Celiac disease and bowel cancers. Already feeling a billion times better since going gluten free.

#110 polarbearscooby

 
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Posted 14 August 2010 - 12:22 PM

Here is a conversation I had with my Dad's sister. She's supposed to be a nurse...and supposedly the smart one?!?

ME: I can't eat anything with wheat in it...

HER: Oh. So you can only eat White bread? (I HATE THIS LINE!!!)

ME: No. White bread is just bleached wheat. I can't have any wheat at all...

HER: OK...So how bout this cake mix? *holding up a box of regular betty crocker cake mix*

ME: No. Not that either

HER: Oh. Well, You can still eat Ravioli out of the can right? Or spaghetti from a box?

ME: NO. I have to eat special spaghetti, regular pasta is made from wheat...

HER: Ok. I got it. So you can eat Kraft Mac and Cheese Right?

ME: *head palm* No.



Needless to say I NEVER let her cook for me....
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#111 i-geek

 
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Posted 14 August 2010 - 01:40 PM

Here is a conversation I had with my Dad's sister. She's supposed to be a nurse...and supposedly the smart one?!?

ME: I can't eat anything with wheat in it...

HER: Oh. So you can only eat White bread? (I HATE THIS LINE!!!)

ME: No. White bread is just bleached wheat. I can't have any wheat at all...

HER: OK...So how bout this cake mix? *holding up a box of regular betty crocker cake mix*

ME: No. Not that either

HER: Oh. Well, You can still eat Ravioli out of the can right? Or spaghetti from a box?

ME: NO. I have to eat special spaghetti, regular pasta is made from wheat...

HER: Ok. I got it. So you can eat Kraft Mac and Cheese Right?

ME: *head palm* No.



Needless to say I NEVER let her cook for me....


Oh, that's just frightening.
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#112 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 14 August 2010 - 03:06 PM

Here is a conversation I had with my Dad's sister. She's supposed to be a nurse...and supposedly the smart one?!?

ME: I can't eat anything with wheat in it...

HER: Oh. So you can only eat White bread? (I HATE THIS LINE!!!)

ME: No. White bread is just bleached wheat. I can't have any wheat at all...

HER: OK...So how bout this cake mix? *holding up a box of regular betty crocker cake mix*

ME: No. Not that either

HER: Oh. Well, You can still eat Ravioli out of the can right? Or spaghetti from a box?

ME: NO. I have to eat special spaghetti, regular pasta is made from wheat...

HER: Ok. I got it. So you can eat Kraft Mac and Cheese Right?

ME: *head palm* No.



Needless to say I NEVER let her cook for me....


I guess she slept through her nutrition classes. Wow I can't believe a nurse could be that clueless, scarey.
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"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#113 Skylark

 
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Posted 14 August 2010 - 06:04 PM

I guess she slept through her nutrition classes. Wow I can't believe a nurse could be that clueless, scarey.

She's one of those foodiots. Ask her where the flour trees grow. You might get an interesting answer. ;)
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#114 kayo

 
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Posted 14 August 2010 - 09:17 PM

I can't believe a nurse could be that clueless


Related story... a friend had gastric bypass surgery and is having trouble with her diet. She suspects she might have lactose intolerance so she called her doctor who said, yogurt and cheese don't have lactose because they're processed so she can go ahead and eat them.

:blink:

I can maybe sort of understand an average person may not know this but a doctor? One who deals with gastric bypass patients who have to drastically change their diets? You'd think they'd be up on basic food intolerance knowledge.
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40 year old former foodie on a quest to feel better!

-IgE to oats and rye
-Diagnosed with Colitis via endoscopy/colonoscopy Oct '10
-Following FODMAP diet since June '10, Positve SIBO test, July '10
-Diagnosed non-celiac gluten intolerant June '10 (celiac in March '10, endocsocopy in Oct '10 shows no signs of celiac)
-Osteopenia June '10
-Gluten free since July '09 & Soy free since December '09
-Dairy free since '06
-IBS & Sjogren's diagnosed '05
-RA diagnosed as a toddler


#115 Jestgar

 
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Posted 14 August 2010 - 10:12 PM

yogurt and hard cheese have very little lactose.....
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#116 missceliac2010

 
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Posted 15 August 2010 - 02:47 AM

I can maybe sort of understand an average person may not know this but a doctor? One who deals with gastric bypass patients who have to drastically change their diets? You'd think they'd be up on basic food intolerance knowledge.


Doctors....LOL! Even though I have a print out, right on my refrigerator door that tells me the lactose content of "commonly eaten foods", and yogurt is pretty low in lactose, I still eat soy yogurt. Although, I will admit, because of a lack of not-gross cheese substitutes out there, I still indulge in "regular" cheese, with the help of "Lactaid." I tried once to eat a regular yogurt, and got sick as a dog, even with the Lactaid. I guess we are all different, and we all have to make choices about how far we are willing to "push" our diet. Lactose, unlike gluten, does not make my belly extend, which is the symptom I find most painful and annoying. My clothes don't fit, my back hurts, ugh, it's hell. But Lactose...if I screw up its just a few trips to the potty with D. I take 2 lactaid before a sandwich with a slice or two of cheese, and that is fine, but if I am having a "cheese plate" (a common snack with my BF and I...(different cheeses and rice crackers...yum..), I have to take 3 - 4 Lactaid. It's probably better if I avoid 'cheese plate lunch' day, but hey, it's a risk I am willing to take!

You can find out the general amount of lactose in commonly eaten foods. That way, you have a formal, educated answer to the lactose content of food, and you can make your own choices. I found a great table here:http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/lactoseintolerance/

They have an excellent chart about half-way down the page. I printed 3 and hung on my fridge, one on bf's fridge, and carry one in my purse. Good luck!
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Heather C.
July, 2010: Diagnosed with Celiac Disease via elimination diet and strong Lactose Intolerance via blood work. My symptoms of glutening include 1. extreme abdominal distention, 2. severe abdominal pain, 3. gas, 4. mood swings/generally negative and unpleasant to be around!

#117 kayo

 
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Posted 15 August 2010 - 08:24 AM

yogurt and hard cheese have very little lactose.....


But very little does not equal none. Besides, he didn't make that distinction so she continued to eat cottage cheese, cream cheese, yogurt, etc.

I'm severely lactose intolerant and been dairy free for a long time so I know my stuff when it comes to lactose, cassein and whey. Lactaid doesn't work for me but I suggested to my friend that she try Lactaid milk or soy milk to see if she feels better.

I don't want to stray too far off topic, just wanted to highlight that nurses and docs can be just as ignorant about food intolerances as anyone else.
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40 year old former foodie on a quest to feel better!

-IgE to oats and rye
-Diagnosed with Colitis via endoscopy/colonoscopy Oct '10
-Following FODMAP diet since June '10, Positve SIBO test, July '10
-Diagnosed non-celiac gluten intolerant June '10 (celiac in March '10, endocsocopy in Oct '10 shows no signs of celiac)
-Osteopenia June '10
-Gluten free since July '09 & Soy free since December '09
-Dairy free since '06
-IBS & Sjogren's diagnosed '05
-RA diagnosed as a toddler


#118 mushroom

 
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Posted 15 August 2010 - 08:44 AM

But very little does not equal none. Besides, he didn't make that distinction so she continued to eat cottage cheese, cream cheese, yogurt, etc.


Everyone has a different tolerance level. I was severely intolerant of milk, cream, ice cream and frozen yogurt. I could eat cheeses, cream cheese, sour cream, yogurt, butter, without any problem.
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Neroli


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#119 Ahorsesoul

 
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Posted 16 August 2010 - 06:24 AM

Kind of like asking someone who's can not eat shellfish if they can have shrimp if you remove the shell.
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1960s-had symptoms-could have been before but don't remember
1970s-told had colitis or nervous stomach-was given phenobarbital, felt great but still had symptoms
Me, dd and ds diagnosed with Lactose Intolerance
2000-osteopenia
2001-had stroke because of medications I was given
June 2003-saw Chiropractor who specialized in nutrition: Celiac Disease not Lactose Intolerance, went gluten free with once in awhile cheating, off soy and dairy for about 6 months
June 2003-found excellent doctor for fibromyalgia (who has found out she has Celiac Disease)
May 2006-went gluten free with NO cheating-excellent! Made all the difference in the world

#120 floral

 
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Posted 27 November 2012 - 12:39 AM

When you have a gastric bypass you lose the part of your intestine that digests lactose. You are told before surgery that you will become lactose intolerant. To me it didn't make any difference since I had been severely lactose intolerant since the age of 18. I'm surprised that the above doctor who performs this surgery for a living wouldn't have informed all of his patient's of this beforehand. ?????
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