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Lectins - Things Everyone Should Know
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This is a remarkably biased article. Humans are well-evolved to deal with dietary lectins. Many of them are detoxified by natural intestinal flora. Others have beneficial effects. It is possible that people who are lectin-sensitive have some degree of dysbiosis.

Examples of the beneficial effects are that lectins from onion and garlic promote the function of bile and lectins from licorice have a naturally anti-inflammatory effect.

I figured an article this biased could only be written to sell something. Sure enough, click the link at the bottom of the page to find a supplement called "lectin lock".

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Not all lectins are bad, just as not all bacteria are bad. But if you happen to be sensitive to particular lectins, they are nasty little blighters :unsure: just as the wrong bacteria in the wrong place can do a number on you. I have had to eliminate most of the major high-lectin food groups, and am very interested in Lectin Lock as a means of keeping the odd ones at bay, and to avoid becoming intolerant to more of them. I don't think you should dismiss them so lightly, Skylark.

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I don't think it's the lectins she's dismissing, but the way that article presents things. I didn't look up the research papers but many of them are old (newer methods of study may, or may not, give different results), are from less mainstream journals (may or may not be as well reviewed for accuracy), and the titles of several indicate animal studies, which should NEVER be automatically assumed to apply to humans.

Also, as we all know, what may be true for one body isn't true for another. The whole tone of "these are evil for every person" struck me as scare mongering. Skylark was dedicated enough to pick up on the fact that they are trying to sell you something.

Maybe their product works, and maybe it doesn't, but I personally dismiss scare-tactic companies as disreputable.

If you do try it, shroomie, be sure to give a review. It may be something worth keeping in your arsenal.

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It is possible that people who are lectin-sensitive have some degree of dysbiosis.

It is also possible that people who are gluten intolerant have some degree of dysbiosis. It is also possible that even when they do not have dysbiosis they are still gluten (lectin) intolerant.

This is the statement I took issue with. Gluten is not an issue for everyone, just as lectins are not. One should be thankful one does not have that problem instead of dissing those who do.

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It is also possible that people who are gluten intolerant have some degree of dysbiosis. It is also possible that even when they do not have dysbiosis they are still gluten (lectin) intolerant.

This is the statement I took issue with. Gluten is not an issue for everyone, just as lectins are not. One should be thankful one does not have that problem instead of dissing those who do.

I don't think Skylark was dissing anyone but provided some excellent points on that article. In fact, most of the lectin containing foods are some of the healthiest and nutrient packed in the human diet and should not be excluded from the diet unless there is a clear problem with them. I agree with Skylark

in that you have to be suspicious of anyone writing an article relating to health concerns and then try to sell a product that supposedly can be used to treat the condition.

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Hold on everybody...LOL

I guess I should have clearly stated why I think the article has value. I certainly don't think lectins are all evil. And while I did notice the link to a company selling supplements, that really doesn't detract from what I see as important.

What I found enlightening was the in-depth explanation of how lectins interact with the cells of the body. And the ways in which lectins can be both beneficial and troublesome. The article explains how certain things within the digestive system and elsewhere function.

Sure, a person can probably have one of the conditions mentioned without a lectin being the culprit. But since lectins are in all sorts of foods, and the body apparently produces some, it means they do effect everyone. I don't necessarily mean negatively, just that they are a part of life. And the more we understand how the body functions, the more we're able to work with it for better health.

The article does give some examples of beneficial lectins too, so it isn't totally biased against them.

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For those who would like some additional reading about lectins from someone not pushing a product, you might like to read this from a "nutritional educator". Krispin Sullivan:

http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

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Shroomie, I'm so sorry you read my reply as dismissive. I didn't mean to be dismissive about lectins, but rather that particular article. I know your and other lectin sensitve folks' problems are absolutely real.

I was really put off by the tone of the article. Jestgar used the perfect phrase, "scare mongering". I already know lectin biochemistry to that level so I was more reading tone and "spin" than science.

It makes me so sad when people selectively pick and choose references and write very biased articles. It makes honest scientists look bad. :(

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Shroomie, I'm so sorry you read my reply as dismissive. I didn't mean to be dismissive about lectins, but rather that particular article. I know your and other lectin sensitve folks' problems are absolutely real.

I was really put off by the tone of the article. Jestgar used the perfect phrase, "scare mongering". I already know lectin biochemistry to that level so I was more reading tone and "spin" than science.

It makes me so sad when people selectively pick and choose references and write very biased articles. It makes honest scientists look bad. :(

Thanks for the clarification, Skylark :) . Nobody needs to scaremonger me about lectins, I am already scared half to death of them and what they do to my body :( . I'm all in favor of anything to divert the little bastards from latching onto my innards. I am also of the opinion that a lot of the other intolerances that gluten intolerants report could well be ascribed to lectins, since there are, after all, lectins in gluten as well :unsure: .

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Hold on everybody...LOL

I guess I should have clearly stated why I think the article has value. I certainly don't think lectins are all evil. And while I did notice the link to a company selling supplements, that really doesn't detract from what I see as important.

What I found enlightening was the in-depth explanation of how lectins interact with the cells of the body. And the ways in which lectins can be both beneficial and troublesome. The article explains how certain things within the digestive system and elsewhere function.

Sure, a person can probably have one of the conditions mentioned without a lectin being the culprit. But since lectins are in all sorts of foods, and the body apparently produces some, it means they do effect everyone. I don't necessarily mean negatively, just that they are a part of life. And the more we understand how the body functions, the more we're able to work with it for better health.

The article does give some examples of beneficial lectins too, so it isn't totally biased against them.

well- i for one am happy someone posted something on lectins... (breathe cassie- u know everyone's gonna start shooting u down)... BECAUSE- you're on to something RICEGUY- but- this article is only slightly incorrect- because, like everything else out there in the media- it's still a "one size fits all"...

take it one step further and read anything by Dr. Peter D'Adamo... he and his father have studied Lectins and Bloodtype for decades now... it is pretty dead on...

it's absolutely true the effect of lectins! but everybody is different- for example: im a Gi/Celiac bloodytpe O-> i feel superb after eating red meat but my Celiac friend who's an A-> she gets horrific heartburn after meat. She eats Soy, Peanuts, & gluten-free grains 24/7.. but those things tear my digestion up... im telling you- he is light years ahead of the mainstream...

the Bloodtype Diet is why i gave up wheat in the 1st place... unfortunately because of it, i probably missed out on a DEFINITIVE Celiac Result- but the diet probably saved me from a decade of the "D"...

im absolutely serious- there's a wealth of info in his books & studies...

i am a Type O Nonsecretor- and the diet totally rings true for me. (no wheat, dairy, soy, high fructose fruits, honey, most grains, potatoes, sugar, etc... )

also as a nonsecretor- im 200x more likely to have Celiac & likely to be Iga deficient-> sure enough, my Iga serum was deficient... i never had the biopsy, but because of all this- & my double DQ8- i am off gluten FOR GOOD.

please dont be skeptical- i would bet my life on it-

of course he says- to listen to your body- and if you have a disease like Celiac or Diabetes- you comply with your disease guidelines.. because the bloodtype gene is only one piece to the puzzle- but i tell u what- it's a great start!

(sorry long)

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take it one step further and read anything by Dr. Peter D'Adamo...

I, personally, think this guy's a total scam artist. There are multitudes of markers to measure on blood cells, and absolutely no reason to believe that the one everyone happens to know about is the one key to everyone's dietary issues. His entire premise is flawed and I can't believe people give him money to follow his unsubstantiated advice.

check out wiki

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_type_diet

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just wanted to share-> as far as my parents & siblings, and my best friends, & several other friends- the diets have been about 95% correct.

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im a Gi/Celiac bloodytpe O-> i feel superb after eating red meat but my Celiac friend who's an A-> she gets horrific heartburn after meat. She eats Soy, Peanuts, & gluten-free grains 24/7..

Well, I'm a type A too (positive however) and I eat meat all the time but soy, peanuts, legumes, quinoa, corn, nightshades all kill me and they are supposed to be my foods :o I would not waste my money on his books.

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I, personally, think this guy's a total scam artist. There are multitudes of markers to measure on blood cells, and absolutely no reason to believe that the one everyone happens to know about is the one key to everyone's dietary issues. His entire premise is flawed and I can't believe people give him money to follow his unsubstantiated advice.

check out wiki

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_type_diet

I'm completely with you. I have a friend who met D'Adamo and she has absolutely nothing good to say about the man. He is laughing his way to the bank.

I do think some folks who have trouble with wheat and are negative for allergy and celiac tests could possibly be reacting to wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and I've said that in other posts. I really wonder if WGA crossing damaged intestines or not being metabolized by missing gut bacteria isn't part of why people with Crohn's and other inflammatory diseases don't eat wheat well.

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