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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Protein Ideas
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14 posts in this topic

Hello Everyone,

I recently started working out, (mostly cardio for now, but slowing starting weight training) and I'm looking for more ways to incorporate protein. I feel like I'm not getting enough. BUT I'm also in a cooking slump and don't feel like doing much prep work. I was just wondering if anyone had good ideas for fast high protein meals. I would prefer doing real food instead of protein shakes, but it has been something I've been debating lately.

Thanks!

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I eat: a can of tuna. A can of salmon. Cooked fish of any kind. Baked chicken breast, can of chicken, for that matter. Eggs, do just egg whites if you plan to eat a lot. Lentils, beans, chickpeas (as hummus if you like dipping). Turkey breast. Ground turkey breast.

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I do really enjoy hummus, I should work that in more with some veggies for dipping.

The beans and lentils sound interesting, I haven't had much cooking with them myself though, maybe someone on the forum has a good bean salad recipe or something similar?

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Cottage Cheese is full of protein (12 grams) and is really filling.

Also, Yogurt has 6 grams of protein. This could be eaten for breakfast with a fruit or whatever to add protein to what you are already getting.

Wenmin

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Take a basic vinaigrette and toss it with two-three types of beans and diced onion if you like it. Maybe add some lemon juice or fresh chopped herbs. Chopped veg like cucumbers optional.

Generic Vinaigrette:

2 T olive oil

1 T white wine vinegar (balsamic, red wine, cider, etc)

1/4 t salt

black pepper to taste

1 t dried herbs (thyme, oregano, etc)

garlic, minced, to taste

Mix well.

Lentils are wonderful. I mostly make salad with the French green lentils, or soup with either the small red or common brown types.

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Costco turkey burgers. The "natural flavoring" is rosemary.

Hormel Naturals has these packets of chopped grilled or roasted chicken-just warm it up, about 6 oz per package.

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If you're in a real hurry, one fast, high-protein meal is pea soup. Just empty a bag of frozen peas into a bowl, and rinse with hot tap water to quickly thaw them out. Then put them into your blender, add enough water to cover, and blend until smooth. Add your favorite seasonings, and heat it in the microwave. One pound of peas will yield about 3 cups of soup, with over 50% of the RDI of protein, and 100% of the RDI of fiber, plus lots of vitamins and minerals.

Red (and yellow) lentils cook faster than other types - about 20 minutes. Lentils are very high in protein, and of course many other nutrients.

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I was also going to suggest pea protein...I buy mine in a powder form (25 grams of protein per scoop!), and then I add water, and half a avocado.

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My easy meal is frozen chicken breasts tossed into a frying pan with olive oil and seasoned with sea salt and Herbes de Provence. They take a while to cook, since I cover them and cook slowly until they're thawed, but it's super-easy.

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I'm looking for more ways to incorporate protein. I feel like I'm not getting enough. BUT I'm also in a cooking slump and don't feel like doing much prep work.

I have two solutions for you, both at separate ends of the spectrum.

EASY: Go to Costco and buy the 98% Fat Free Natural Sliced Oven-Roasted Turkey Breast (Three Pack, 14 grams per package, is only $8.99). Two slices pack 10 grams of protein and only 1 gram of fat! When I'm feel particularly lazy, I take the top of the package and cut it into ten quadrants and eat it with a knife and fork. No plates to clean up and you can easily get 40 grams of protein.

SOME ASSEMBLY REQUIRED: Do you like to grill? Then take the advice of the previous posters and opt for Costco turkey breasts, fish and chicken breasts. While you are griling, use the heat from the grill and put a dozen eggs in a pot with water and boil them. Chill them in the fridge overnight and you have the incredible, edible egg any time you want to some easy protein. (You can always do this stove top, but I like being energy efficient)

~Wheatfreedude~

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Thanks for all the great ideas everyone!

I definately want to try the bean salad, and I'm curious if I will like the pea soup idea.

Just wondering, what does everyone think the best tasting beans are? Should I use kidney, black, white beans, etc.?

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And, wheatfreedude, I don't grill. I just live in a one bedroom apartment, so there's not a whole lot of room for a BBQ. All my cooking is done just on stove top for now.

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And, wheatfreedude, I don't grill. I just live in a one bedroom apartment, so there's not a whole lot of room for a BBQ. All my cooking is done just on stove top for now.

No worries, you can actually buy roasted vegetables in a shelf stable jar. And they heat up in the microwave in a matter of seconds. You'll be amazed what type of flavor it will add.

Now, get the big pot out and start boiling the incredible, edible eggs!

~Wheatfreedude~

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I'd just go out and buy 5 or 6 different kinds to see what you like best. Taste very so much, it's hard to predict what you'll prefer. I usually have black beans, navy beans, and chickpeas on hand. Elephant beans, pinto beans and kidney beans I buy as needed. Dried lentils and split peas, almost always. Black eyed peas, New Year's Day only.

Really, it depends on how you're going to use them. Like, white beans and rosemary are great together, but black beans and chili powder meld nicely.

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