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One Good Thing.
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This is my first post, so Hi everybody. I was wondering if anyone else found this one benefit to being diagnosed with celiac. I hope it doesn't sound mean and immature, but I sometimes feel superior to others. I see the long lines at Mcdonalds and constantly hear people talk about how they'd love to lose weight but just can't. Understand that they are eating something completely unhealhy while they say that.

Does anyone else every feel really good about their self control? I can't help it, but sometimes I look down on people who complain about how hard it is to stick to a diet. If you're like me (Celiac diagnosed for two years) you HAVE to stick to the diet; if you don't, the consequences are awful. It helps my self esteem to know that I can do what so many Americans can't: have a specific diet and stick to it. Is it always easy? Of course not, but I'm proud of myself for doing it.

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This is my first post, so Hi everybody. I was wondering if anyone else found this one benefit to being diagnosed with celiac. I hope it doesn't sound mean and immature, but I sometimes feel superior to others. I see the long lines at Mcdonalds and constantly hear people talk about how they'd love to lose weight but just can't. Understand that they are eating something completely unhealhy while they say that.

Does anyone else every feel really good about their self control? I can't help it, but sometimes I look down on people who complain about how hard it is to stick to a diet. If you're like me (Celiac diagnosed for two years) you HAVE to stick to the diet; if you don't, the consequences are awful. It helps my self esteem to know that I can do what so many Americans can't: have a specific diet and stick to it. Is it always easy? Of course not, but I'm proud of myself for doing it.

I agree with your view of celiac disease. I have diagnosed celiac and 6 other food allergies, which all cause painful gastrointestinal reactions. So I can easily abstain from gluten and my other allergies. That leaves me almost no 'junk' or 'processed' or even 'fast' food. Avoiding my allergens forces me to eat a healthy diet. Fortunately I prefer to be healthy and painfree more than I want to blend in with other people's eating choices.

Nevertheless, many people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance have difficulty initially sticking to the diet which helps them heal from gluten reaction damage. I suspect one difference is PAIN. People who have painful reactions, not just diarrhea, but long lasting excruciating, gut pain are more likely to obsessively abstain from gluten or their diagnosed allergens. I can look at a piece of bread and recall feeling like bits of broken glass are slowly moving through my intestines for 1-2 weeks. That motivates me to avoid gluten.

SUE

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but I'm proud of myself for doing it.

Hi! I agree with you. I am proud of myself too. After years and years of being overweight and unable to control my eating, I had gastric bypass surgery. It changed my life. I learned that food is fuel...not my friend, not my confidant, and it doesn't have control over me! I have control over IT! The post surgery diet is very limited, and I did very well sticking to it. I got the weight off and maintained the loss over the past 3 years. I won...food didn't! (Yes, I got help...the surgery....but it still requires will-power and the desire to be successful.)

When I was diagnosed with Celiac, I had similar feelings. I thought, I can do this! Food is fuel. I just need different fuel! I love the fact that people will say "HOW DO YOU DO IT?" Or "I would DIE without wheat!" I always laugh a little inside and think, yes you can, and if you can't...you are weak. Celiac Disease teaches you to be strong. Of course we have our weak days. I cry, I get upset and frustrated...etc... But most of the time, I'm strong! And I'm damn proud of myself.

So all I have to say is "You go Gluten-free peeps!" We rock! Another allergy? Another sensitivity? Bring it on! We can handle anything!

:0)

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Yea I have to agree with the other poster that pain and being sick for a couple weeks is a really strong motivator. Some of us do have trouble sticking with the diet because their symptoms are not as strong so it is harder for them. Sometimes I envy those that can take the risks and not suffer as severely. It is always good to find the silver lining in the clouds though.

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I agree! I am not dx'ed but do feel 100% better off gluten and dairy so far.

Maybe it's because I haven't been doing it that long but I don't find it to be difficult at all. I am actually amazed at my self control. I just have no desire to be in the pain I was in daily for an entire 7.5 month period. My life basically came to a screeching halt because I felt so bad every day.

I say keep your gluten and other junk! I just want to feel good and live my life. :)

And I was totally one of those people that NEVER stuck to a diet. Ever. Until now.

That misery and feeling like my body was at war with itself is a strong motivator.

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That's a good idea themick33 , avoiding gluten can be very difficult so it's definitely a very good achievement to be proud of :D

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I am delighted that I know what my health problems were caused by and that I can avoid it without too much effort. And yes, I was someone who had significant pain as well as a constellation of additional issues. So, am I proud that I avoid pain? Not particularly. But it's something I have to do, so I do it faithfully. I think it view it sort of like a type one diabetic views insulin shots, not necessarily convinient but necessary. (Except types ones would suffer much more fatal consequences much much more quickly.)

I have to say that I do not look down on those who have a harder time with the diet-- I mean, we all make mistakes. Sometime this week I must have not washed my hands before eating, or somehow contaminated myself enough with the food of a child I was babysitting and ended up pretty uncomfortable for a few days. And we're talking hints of CHERRIO dust on my shirts, not going out and eating a piece of cake. It's a struggle to find problems like that and work on keeping myself safe.

I already cooked 95% of my food from whole foods (if we count bread and cheese as whole foods), so the cooking at home transition has been very easy. Dealing with the outside world has been harder. It's still an effort to not accept a taste of someone's food at dinner, or to not grab a tortilla chip out of a basket because it was probably fried in contamination oil. Some of me wants to just not eat outside my apartment, but eating and socializing are closely intertwined. I also live in a city where there are gluten-free options in numerous restaurants, so it also seems paranoid to not eat out ever. And hey, I LIKE to eat out.

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I already cooked 95% of my food from whole foods (if we count bread and cheese as whole foods), so the cooking at home transition has been very easy. Dealing with the outside world has been harder. It's still an effort to not accept a taste of someone's food at dinner, or to not grab a tortilla chip out of a basket because it was probably fried in contamination oil. Some of me wants to just not eat outside my apartment, but eating and socializing are closely intertwined. I also live in a city where there are gluten-free options in numerous restaurants, so it also seems paranoid to not eat out ever. And hey, I LIKE to eat out.

Good point. It's easier to stay gluten free if you already prepare or cook most of your foods from whole foods, rather than relying on processed or fast foods, which often contain gluten. Also preparing your own foods is less expensive than relying on gluten free processed products. Many people who have difficulty with gluten free dietn have never really learned to cook.

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I don't look down on people. I just feel sorry for them that they are making themselves sick.

As for motivation. I have hurt since I was 7 years old from suicidal thoughts, feeling like someone was sticking my muscles with white hot pins or pokers, as well as flu like symptoms, major fatigue, dealing with alternating D and C. Allergies, chronic athmatic bronchitis at least twice a year, severe anxiety. You name it I just about had it. ALL of that has resoved. That is my motivation.

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I absolutely agree that becoming so ill is a huge motivator in our way of eating..But it has also opened my eyes to how people eat and shop for their food.I have caught myself many times looking at people grocery shopping and glancing in their carts and thinking to myslef "You have NO food in there!! Its all junk, processed horrible stuff!!"...Being a celiac has definately educated me on healthy living and dieting and i honestly wish more people could realize how damaging their eating habits can be. If anything good has come out of this disease it is that my friends and family really took notice of their own eating habits and many have turned to whole foods after watching all that i have been through.

jodi

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I have lost 48 pounds since going gluten free! I am super proud of that! I feel great about that aspect of my life :) I can't wait til I get to the point where I feel sick more than I feel well, but I am still trying to figure Celiac's out

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wow! I feel EMPOWERED for the first time in my life, THIS IS WHAT'S WRONG WITH ME!!!! and I can control it :) I am still not even all the way healed, but I feel better than I have since I was diagnosed with 'colitis' 25 years ago. I had no idea how much I planned around/skipped things/compromised my life because I felt like krap or was waiting to feel sick. I am eating gluten-free and find myself waiting for that intestinal 'shift' that hasn't happened in TWO WHOLE DAYS. this is a record for me! yeahhhhhhhhh!!!!! :D

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