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Anyone Here Use Knitting To Help Cope With Celiac And Gluten Sensitivities?


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20 replies to this topic

#1 Lynayah

 
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Posted 08 August 2010 - 03:31 PM

Do you knit to help cope with a gluten-free lifestyle?
  • 1
Gluten Intolerant with double HLA-DQ6. Pre-diagnosis: Weight gain, swelling, diarrhea, mouth sores, back pain, body aches, fatigue, muscle weakness, BRAIN FOG, runny nose, recurrent sinus infections, bruising, low white cell count (whole life), and more. My feet were so bad, I could hardly walk. Toward the end: Chronic Vit. D deficiency (almost no D in my body despite a quality multi-vit. each day).

There is hope! Gluten-free since Sept. '09, and I have my life back - I feel better than in many, many years!

Favorite quotation: "You must do the thing you think you cannot do." - Eleanor Roosevelt

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#2 mommida

 
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Posted 08 August 2010 - 05:04 PM

I just started knitting when I was having problems with the gall bladder that came out in February.
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Michigan

#3 K8ling

 
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Posted 08 August 2010 - 06:10 PM

I don't know how to but I want to learn.
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Diagnosed with Gluten Allergy April 2010. Family history of Celiac disease and bowel cancers. Already feeling a billion times better since going gluten free.

#4 sb2178

 
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Posted 10 August 2010 - 11:11 AM

Some, but I'm actually a spinner. So I make the pretty yarn...
  • 1

2/2010 Malabsorption becomes dramatically noticable
3/2010 Negative IgA EMA; negative IgA TTG
4/2010 Negative biopsy
5/2010 Elimination diet; symptoms begin to resolve on gluten-free diet round two (10 days)
5/2010 Diagnosed gluten sensitive based on weakly positive repeat IgA & IgG TTGs and dietary response; decline capsule endoscopy.

Now, what to do about my cookbook in progress? Make it gluten-free?

#5 AvatarOfChaos

 
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Posted 10 August 2010 - 12:41 PM

I don't knit specifically to help me cope with gluten-free - I'm fairly at ease with gluten-free. But I am also an avid knitter :)
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#6 Lesx2

 
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Posted 10 August 2010 - 08:37 PM

Ditto to Avatars reply above for me
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#7 Lynayah

 
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Posted 14 August 2010 - 06:42 AM

Some, but I'm actually a spinner. So I make the pretty yarn...



Oooooh, I'm envious! I want to learn to spin eventually. Do you use a wheel?

Has spinning helped you cope with living a gluten-free lifestyle?
  • 0
Gluten Intolerant with double HLA-DQ6. Pre-diagnosis: Weight gain, swelling, diarrhea, mouth sores, back pain, body aches, fatigue, muscle weakness, BRAIN FOG, runny nose, recurrent sinus infections, bruising, low white cell count (whole life), and more. My feet were so bad, I could hardly walk. Toward the end: Chronic Vit. D deficiency (almost no D in my body despite a quality multi-vit. each day).

There is hope! Gluten-free since Sept. '09, and I have my life back - I feel better than in many, many years!

Favorite quotation: "You must do the thing you think you cannot do." - Eleanor Roosevelt

#8 Lynayah

 
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Posted 14 August 2010 - 06:55 AM

I don't knit specifically to help me cope with gluten-free - I'm fairly at ease with gluten-free. But I am also an avid knitter :)


Because I took up knitting after being diagnosed, I can definitely say it helped me cope with going gluten free.

Before being diagnosed, I could eat anything and everything (or so I thought). I had lost over 100 pounds (not easy, I'm not one of those skinny gluten free gals) and learned to keep it off.

I'm super, super sensitive and found I did best by sticking to meat, fruit, vegetables and certified gluten free whole grains.

I'm a foodie, and like so many others here, my family members are foodies, too. EVERYTHING revolved around food.

It was a real challenge for me to learn not to feel sorry for myself at first. I was cranky, too, with lots of negativity.

Knitting helped me so much. It relaxed me, and it also gave me something to do at family gatherings while everyone ate. Even though I could eat gluten free foods, I needed a diversion to keep food from being the most important thing in my life, especially since I'd gained 15 pounds during my gluten challenge. Augh!

I told myself that my knitting time also has to be my positive time -- that is, while I knit, I was allowed to think only positive thoughts. This was difficult at first, but I kept at it, and eventually the act of knitting became an almost immediate way for me to enter into positivity.

They say that the repetitive motion of it helps produce the same brainwaves as meditation does.

For me, it works . . . except for the times when I want to throw the project out the window because I've dropped a gazillion stitches that day!
  • 0
Gluten Intolerant with double HLA-DQ6. Pre-diagnosis: Weight gain, swelling, diarrhea, mouth sores, back pain, body aches, fatigue, muscle weakness, BRAIN FOG, runny nose, recurrent sinus infections, bruising, low white cell count (whole life), and more. My feet were so bad, I could hardly walk. Toward the end: Chronic Vit. D deficiency (almost no D in my body despite a quality multi-vit. each day).

There is hope! Gluten-free since Sept. '09, and I have my life back - I feel better than in many, many years!

Favorite quotation: "You must do the thing you think you cannot do." - Eleanor Roosevelt

#9 kareng

 
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Posted 14 August 2010 - 07:11 AM

I told myself that my knitting time also has to be my positive time -- that is, while I knit, I was allowed to think only positive thoughts. This was difficult at first, but I kept at it, and eventually the act of knitting became an almost immediate way for me to enter into positivity.

They say that the repetitive motion of it helps produce the same brainwaves as meditation does.


I do that when I'm walking the dog. Only positive thoughts. If I can't think of happy stuff, I make up a story or count how many people have pink flowers or Halloween decorations, etc. After a few minutes, the bad stuff is gone.
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#10 SueQueBlue

 
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Posted 14 August 2010 - 08:04 AM

I don't knit anymore (hurts my hands), but I cross-stitch. I have been an avid stitcher for several years now, and found even before I was diagnosed, it is very theraputic. The repeative motion allows my mind to wander, and it is sort of like meditating.
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#11 Lynayah

 
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Posted 14 August 2010 - 08:25 AM

I do that when I'm walking the dog. Only positive thoughts. If I can't think of happy stuff, I make up a story or count how many people have pink flowers or Halloween decorations, etc. After a few minutes, the bad stuff is gone.



It's so cool how well it works. At first it was a challenge -- it is amazing how easily negative thoughts can become a habit.
  • 0
Gluten Intolerant with double HLA-DQ6. Pre-diagnosis: Weight gain, swelling, diarrhea, mouth sores, back pain, body aches, fatigue, muscle weakness, BRAIN FOG, runny nose, recurrent sinus infections, bruising, low white cell count (whole life), and more. My feet were so bad, I could hardly walk. Toward the end: Chronic Vit. D deficiency (almost no D in my body despite a quality multi-vit. each day).

There is hope! Gluten-free since Sept. '09, and I have my life back - I feel better than in many, many years!

Favorite quotation: "You must do the thing you think you cannot do." - Eleanor Roosevelt

#12 BethJ

 
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Posted 14 August 2010 - 10:50 AM

I never thought about it but it probably is good for relieving stress. I started crocheting after having broken my right wrist. I had a lot of pain and discomfort so the crochet "rehab" worked miracles. The wrist has long healed but I'm still crocheting.

I never had much anxiety with the gluten-free lifestyle other than tears of joy when I found a great new gluten-free product in the store. :)
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Beth in Florida

Gluten-free since 7/19/08
Alcohol free since 6/28/10

#13 sb2178

 
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Posted 14 August 2010 - 01:09 PM

No, I've been spinning since I was pretty small (mom's a weaver and branches out to other fiber jazz some). I have a double treadle Schacht and a handful of spindles. Which is use varies... travel is always a spindle, but I use them at home some too.

You should learn! Ghandhi was right that the world would be a better place if we all spun daily. AND, you can make really fun/weird/playful yarns just like you want for that _____ you're going to knit/crochet/etc.
  • 0

2/2010 Malabsorption becomes dramatically noticable
3/2010 Negative IgA EMA; negative IgA TTG
4/2010 Negative biopsy
5/2010 Elimination diet; symptoms begin to resolve on gluten-free diet round two (10 days)
5/2010 Diagnosed gluten sensitive based on weakly positive repeat IgA & IgG TTGs and dietary response; decline capsule endoscopy.

Now, what to do about my cookbook in progress? Make it gluten-free?

#14 Lynayah

 
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Posted 15 August 2010 - 05:03 AM

Anyone here going to any of the Stitches conferences this year?

I am going to Chicago and Hartford, and I'm hoping it will be easy to find gluten free food.

Chicago will be okay. I live close to Chicago, will drive and can pack my own food.

Hartford, I'm flying and I've never been there.
  • 0
Gluten Intolerant with double HLA-DQ6. Pre-diagnosis: Weight gain, swelling, diarrhea, mouth sores, back pain, body aches, fatigue, muscle weakness, BRAIN FOG, runny nose, recurrent sinus infections, bruising, low white cell count (whole life), and more. My feet were so bad, I could hardly walk. Toward the end: Chronic Vit. D deficiency (almost no D in my body despite a quality multi-vit. each day).

There is hope! Gluten-free since Sept. '09, and I have my life back - I feel better than in many, many years!

Favorite quotation: "You must do the thing you think you cannot do." - Eleanor Roosevelt

#15 Lynayah

 
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Posted 21 August 2010 - 07:00 PM

No, I've been spinning since I was pretty small (mom's a weaver and branches out to other fiber jazz some). I have a double treadle Schacht and a handful of spindles. Which is use varies... travel is always a spindle, but I use them at home some too.

You should learn! Ghandhi was right that the world would be a better place if we all spun daily. AND, you can make really fun/weird/playful yarns just like you want for that _____ you're going to knit/crochet/etc.


Thank you for your post. I definitely want to learn someday. I love your reference to Ghandhi. Thank you -- your reference is a new piece of information for me. I agree, and I also think the world would be a better place if we all knit each day.

There's a real connection between knitting and inner peace. It's been shown that knitting produces the same brain waves as meditation. For me, it has made me a MUCH better person. Knitting has been a heaven-sent blessing.
  • 0
Gluten Intolerant with double HLA-DQ6. Pre-diagnosis: Weight gain, swelling, diarrhea, mouth sores, back pain, body aches, fatigue, muscle weakness, BRAIN FOG, runny nose, recurrent sinus infections, bruising, low white cell count (whole life), and more. My feet were so bad, I could hardly walk. Toward the end: Chronic Vit. D deficiency (almost no D in my body despite a quality multi-vit. each day).

There is hope! Gluten-free since Sept. '09, and I have my life back - I feel better than in many, many years!

Favorite quotation: "You must do the thing you think you cannot do." - Eleanor Roosevelt




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