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Grieving For Food
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51 posts in this topic

Sheila

Try Tinkyada pastas....that brand tastes normal..nobody in my family knew the difference until I told them.

As Tiffany said though some brands of gluten free foods are good and some aren't BUT also some gluten containing foods are good and some aren't. It goes both ways for both kinds of products.

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I haven't found a gluten-free bread that I like yet. I tried to make a hamburger the other day with Ener-G white rice bread, and it was so godawful, I had to spit it out. Gross, but true. I have had gluten-free spaghetti, it was okay, but kinda mushy. I tried gluten-free elbow macaroni, and it was terrible. I put it in my dog's dish, and even she wouldn't eat it! My son thought that was pretty hysterical.

Ah-ha! You're trying to replace gluten-filled foods and looking for something to take their same place. That presents a problem that is as much your expectations as it is the food. (And I'm with ya - the Ener-G white rice bread... blech. I'll take cardboard over that any day. Interestingly enough, you can cook with it.)

One of the challenges of this diet is expanding the foods you eat outside of your initial comfort zone. You may not find things to exactly take the place of gluten filled foods you used to have, but you CAN find GOOD TASTING FOOD. It's even harder to do this at first, because it's just plain a huge change to give up those things you liked. But you will get there.

Maybe, for fun, you can list all the foods with gluten that you hated even when you were eating gluten. It might help the mental perspective (it might not... just throwing the idea out). (And I don't mean that in a negative way... perceptions/expectations are tough things and they alone can make us happy or unhappy in identical situations.)

And yeah, try the Tinkyada pasta... your dog would definitely eat it, and I'd bet you'd eat it - happily - too. (Do make sure not to overcook it; overcooking rice pasta will definitely make it mushy.)

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Gluten free bread can be tough- I've found two that I actually really like- Whole Foods gluten-free corn bread (it looks like Wonder bread but it's yummy! Best when toasted) and anandama bread. It's not a special brand of bread- it's just a bread that is made from corn meal and molasses. It's good! My favorite breakfast place has it and I always get it when I go there (but not toasted in the regular toaster).

It's hard trying to replace your favorite gluten foods with gluten-free versions. I, personally, think Pamela's gluten free cookies taste like flavored chalk (your dog probably wouldn't like these either!) but I'm going to start experienting with baking again. I have a recipe for chocolate chip cookies that also uses pudding mix to make the cookies extra moist so I am just going to replace the flour with gluten free flour and a gluten-free pudding. I'll let you know how it comes out.

I also started eating and cooking a lot more ethnic foods- like Thai (just watch out for soy sauce and oyster sauce), Mexican and Indian. Thai is definitely my safety food.

And lo and behold, I can still have Reese's peanut butter cups! Yum..... giving those up would have been hard. Hang in there- it's a learning curve (that feels overwhelming sometimes), Beverly

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There's a lot of good substitutes but some food that I always ate doesn't have any wheat or gluten in it all..I was never a fan of the so-called American junk diet.

East Indian food is one example and there is a buffet in walking distance from me that I cater to at least once a week..Curry is not the only thing that they have..the incredible number of different spices with such exotic tastes open up a huge variety. Just stay away from their bread and samosas..

Want your burger to taste better than ever? Wrap it in Romaine lettuce, trapping in the juicy flavor better than bread ever did..

Want a wild desert? Get pineapple and soak and drown it in worcestershire sauce..

then down it..Awesome!

Tonight I had catfish and quinoa with corn..

Food for Life's brown rice bread toasted has any bread on the market backed off the map...White rice bread? Yuck..Sheila, change from that stuff..

The big mistake I made at first was to buy flax snacks..(yuck)..

Want a great shake? I mix one scoop of RevitalX with one cup frozen cherries, one banana and cover it with red grape juice..Blend...No shake anywhere comes near it.

There is always chocolate..Still a faithful companion to many here..

Pizza made with rice flour exists..Amy's makes it. Check your local health store or Whole Foods Market. Corn pasta and quinoa pasta is just as tasty as semolina was only easier to go down..Most pasta sauce is safe..

Thai food was mentioned here by other posters.

Pop corn is still around..

I think that there is an adjustment period to reorganize and re-evaluate what is in and what is out..I have been gluten-free for about a month and just this week I must have found at least 6 more things that I ate before that are still OK..Just check the label. Tortillas are most usually made from corn flour..Tacos are not..

Hang in there..You will adjust and get used to it..

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(And I'm with ya - the Ener-G white rice bread... blech. I'll take cardboard over that any day. Interestingly enough, you can cook with it.)

I agree with ya Tiffany...Ener-G white rice bread is disgusting!

I like Whole Foods Tomato/Garlic bread a lot. I also use my breadmaker to make my own bread. Nothing complicated, I toss the few ingredients in and press start (I'm not a cook). :)

I also agree that the trial and error is expensive, but after you find (or learn to make) that "perfect" food, it is worth it.

I am currently addicted to Amy's meals for lunch and something in my crockpot for dinner.

My hubby actually loves Ms. Leeper's (sp?) lasagna dinner and the beef stroganoff (sp?) . It is like a gluten-free Hamburger Helper-type meal. A VERY cheap and easy dinner. B)

Good luck to everyone who has just become gluten-free! ;) -Julie

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Shelia, I have found that it is very difficult to find good tasting gluten-free foods without spending lots of money! My daughter hates almost everything from EnerG, especially the rice bread. However, she LOVES Food for Life rice bread. Lately though, we have noticed it has been quite crumbly. She also likes homemade rice bread.

As for pasta, if you do not take it off the heat at the exact second it is cooked it turns to mush. I think the corn pastas are really mushy, but the rice and rice/corn blends come out fine. It does taste disgusting at first. I think much of it goes away after a time on the gluten-free diet though.My dog will not eat any gluten-free food either, so I laughed when I read that!

My daughter was just in the supermarket with me complaining that she was sick of being a celiac and not being able to grab and eat anything. She says I gave it to her because of my Irish ancestory! Anyway, she was venting. I mention it because you had mentioned venting too! Everyone does, not just about gluten-free food either.

She does love the Pamela's cookies though. Someone had mentioned hating them. Unfortunately, you will have to spend your time and money finding what you do like. But, you will be healthy and that is what's important!!

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The only gluten-free bread I will ever buy again is Grandma Ferdon's egg bread. I wasted so much money on absolute crap before I tried this stuff. Even my husband said it was good.

Depending on where you are shipping can be a real PITA, but if you happen to be in the upper midwest it's reasonable.

www.grandmaferdons.com

If you decide to order anything, you MUST try those cinnamon rolls. They are so good.

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I'm sure, I'm going to be in the minority here big time, but I LOVE Ener-G white rice bread. In fact, having traveled around the world in my pre-gluten-free days, I think Ener-G is the best bread, I have ever come across by lightyears.

But knowing about the corn bread and the adadema corn bread is a good idea, because it would be a better way to avoid questions and prying eyes. I just wonder when sorghum bread will become widely available!

Another nice thing is the navy bean pasta.

As for pizza. Well we all know that the crust was never the point, if you will. Don't we?

(Of course, you might not want to trust the words of somebody who loves Ener-G bread more than any other, so try it yourself.)

I've been gluten-free since about Sept 2004, but I've already come to regard the various gluten-free versions of things as the "real deal" and the gluten containing versions as the cheap, crappy, and disgusting imitations.

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I also use my breadmaker to make my own bread. Nothing complicated, I toss the few ingredients in and press start (I'm not a cook). :)

I am not a great cook either, it's just something that I never got deeply into. I don't have a clue how to use a bread maker, but I am considering getting one, since this disease is going to be with me forever. Are they hard to use? Any brands that you would recommend? Will the process be different since you have to use gluten-free flour?

Thanks,!

Sheila

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As I read the replys I just laugh, I have been there, searching and tasting everything and more often than not being disappointed for my gluten-free family.

With that said, I purchased a Zojirushi 2lb bread maker online from WalMart and make Manna from Anna. You set the setting on medium crust, one rise time and remove it immediatley with finished to cool on a rack. WE aren't lucky enough to have a fresh bakery close so mail order almost everything and bake it. Kinnikinnick buns are good, they agree that using lettuce as a bun is yummy but at a party using a bun makes you like everyone else, remember to toast the bread, always! I also use Kinnikinnick bread and bun mix, pizza crust, english muffins and bagels. We are looking for a cracker like ritz, the only ones they like are sun diamond but a variety would be nice.

The best cookie so far is Million Dollar Peanut Butter: l cup peanut butter, l cup white sugar, 1 egg, 1 tsp baking soda, Roll into balls, roll in sugar, place on pan score with sugar coated fork.Yield: 24 cookies, Bake 350, 10 minutes or until lightly brown.

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Hey Sheila,

I'm not sure what make/model my breadmaker is...it was a gift from my mom when I was diagnosed...I'm sure it is a basic model though, because I figured out how to work it! :P I put my "basic" recipe below. Good luck to you! ;)

Basic white bread (has wheat bread consistency though)

1 cup water

1 1/2 TBsp butter or Spectrum (gluten-free/non-dairy)

1 TB sugar

1 tsp salt

1 tsp yeast

For "flour"- 2 sifted Cups of gluten-free flour mix, add 1 tsp. xan-gum, 1 tsp. unflav. gelatin

This was simple, quick, and GOOD!

(I used Bob's Red Mill gluten-free flour mix, and whatever gluten-free unflav. gelatin that I found on the Jello aisle). Side note: This makes a 1 lb. loaf for bread machines

Enjoy! -Julie B)

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:D

In the UK two or three makes of bread making machine are well suited to gluten-free dough, it is something to do with how sticky it gets so the motor has to be strong enough. Mine is the cheapest, not much above £20 ($35 ?) (Cookworks from Argos)

if you do a "search" of this forum you can probably find an old thread on these machines.

Some also have particular programs that are of extra usefulness.

Mine is entertaining, it makes interesting noisesand has a window in the top I can't see anything through! The results equalled the best of the shop gluten-free loaves and far exceeded most shop ones.

I hate ordinary bread making as I hate getting my fingers and hands messy.

I go around with bags of "bombay mix" and dried fruit in my baggage and snap up "onion bhajis" whenever I see them (checking labels).

A friend brings bags of Reeses from US trips (I think the plainer chocolates here are good but once it gets complex, foreign ones - incl U.S. - are better).

Planning ahead is a good strategy, always.

An interesting question is:

What is and was the biggest intimacy in your life?

In a couple of dimensions the answer no doubt is:

- mentally - one's own emotions and thought patterns

- bodily - wheat and gluten - several times a day, almost every days of one's life beyond the first year (or less?), copious quantities

It's no wonder one has feelings about the change!!!

Carry on doing things you could do before and still can do - enjoy those fabulous spring cabbages. the water you cook them in, when cooled a little is a wonderful drink!!!

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:)

Couple more thoughts on baking -

- I use the instruction book of the machine, substituting flours as advised here and elsewhere PLUS a gluten-free bread machine baking book PLUS the recipes on flour and mix bag sides. I usually mix the recipes which is exactly what is NOT recommended but then when I'm in the right mood I can be both placid and adventurous (and have only myself as an appreciative public) which is probably quite a good combination to gain experience. Enquire after good books for you to follow. Often you just have about four dry ingredients, a couple of liquids, try to mix what needs mixing, fairly well, and just layer the ingredients in the machine, usually the liquid at the bottom.

- Don't start too late in the day as you'll be too curious and stay up all night! Mostly it will need to cool and rest both inside the machine then outside.

- If it turns out funny it will still be wholesome to make cheesecake base, crumble topping, bread&butter pudding etc. :P

_When I have soggy gluten-free bread I make a warm sandwich in my Philips toasted sandwich maker.

- Consult those more experienced than me! Experienced doesn't mean complicated.

Wishing you Good Food ...

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The best chocolate chips I have EVER eaten, pre- or post-celiac are called

Enjoy Life Chocolate Chips

They are also soy-free and dairy-free (I have multiple food allergies -- it was hard for me to say goodbye to cheesecake and chocolate eclairs).

I am a newbie and have only ordered them through the online Gluten-Free Mall. You might be able to order them direct from the company. Warning, when I discovered them I ate a bag of them over a 24-hour period. Right out of the sack! They are yum-ola.

westiepaws.

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I was thinking about what someone said here- that you don't necessarily need to look for gluten-free substitutes for your favorite things- I'm the one who thinks Pamela's cookies taste like chalk- but to start experimenting and trying new things that are gluten free naturally. What great advice! So yesterday I made peanut butter cookies which require no flour and just threw chocolate chips in them and voila....YUM! Now normally before I would have made chocolate chip cookies and been happy but now, since I'm gluten-free, I got creative enough (for me ;) to put my two favorite things together and I like them even better.

On a gluten-free substitution note, tonight I made Tinkyada penne pasta with prosciutto, garlic, olive oil, basil, thyme, mushrooms, asparagus and gorgonzola cheese. It was HEAVENLY! And yes- had I not known that Tinkyada was rice pasta, I NEVER would have guessed. It rocks!

Also, last night I took Chebe pizza dough (the smaller ones called "Chebe on the Go") and put olive oil, mushrooms, garlic and gorgonzola on it (I'm on a gorgonzola kick now that I can tolerate lactose again) and it was like my favorite pizza at the Flatbread Company. The Chebe on the Go doughs are much thicker and softer than the bigger ones. They are awesome!

I've just realized it's a learning curve and it takes time. When I first went gluten-free I bought gluten-free bread and cookies etc just becauise they were gluten-free. Some of it was horrible, but some of it is really good. It just takes time to figure out what you like. And this board is such a good place to get support, advice and feedback. Hang in there, it takes time!

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Sheely, I used a bread machine for many years before going gluten free. I now use a kitchen aid to mix my bread and don't see the need for a bread machine. gluten-free bread ismuch easier to make than a dough that needs kneading. With practice, you will soon make much better bread than you will find in most places. Play around with different flours and mixes. I use sorghum, potato flour, tapioca and bean flour. Carol Fenster has a web site with suggestions and a recipes. Give yourself time to forget some tastes and also time to learn to make your own. Things get better and new products are being developed at an amazing rate. Experiment and you will soon be very excited with what you create. Look ahead = it will get better.

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Okay I have to ask a question. How is it that everyone is seeming to be able to fit the added expense of the specialty gluten-free foods into their budget? I have found some things mainstream that are gluten-free, but not enough for everyday. I used to like going to the grocery store and liked to cook and loved to bake. And my family LOVED for me to do so. Now I get very frustrated and crabby when I'm at the grocery store I can't think of enough things to buy for meals for a family of five(when only one is diag. celiac). There is a place across town to get some gluten-free stuff but it is expensive and I can't afford much of the added expense. And let me tell you if we run out of gluten-free pancake mix my family sees no problem in using mine! :angry: When I make gluten-free brownies they eat them as fast as they are done then there is no more gluten-free, just regular. :( I can't keep up and can't seem to afford this. :blink: HOW is EVERYONE else out there doing it?

Cheree'

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WhimsyGirl- That would make me very angry too. My husband always asks before he eats anything that was bought specifically because it was gluten-free (we don't have kids yet). I don'y buy too much stuff just because it's gluten-free but I was never a big pasta, bread person. We eat a lot of chicken, veggies etc. The only thyings that I buy specifically gluten-free are pizza crust (because it's nice to have a pizza once in awhile), bread (but I don't eat a ton of bread anyway) and crackers (I love those but my husband doesn't really eat crackers.

Other than that, I usually eat peanut butter and jelly on rice cakes for breakfast, leftovers from the previous night's dinner for lunch and then fish, veggies, rice, potatoes, chicken with various sauces/spices for dinner. It took me a LONG time to figure this out though (at first, I thought I had to buy stuff just because it was gluten-free)

Maybe try having a talk with your family that if stuff is marked "Mom's" they should ask before eating it.

If you have an actual diagnosis from a doctor you can also get a tax break on gluten-free food (it's here on this website but I haven't done it since I don't have the diagnosis).

Hope this helps. I don't know how old your kids are, but maybe they just don't get it.

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Let me ask one more thing, is there anywhere where some of the tasty gluten-free foods are posted that I could print out and take with me to the store? I am winging it and have heard a few things mentioned here and there in posts but it would be handy to be able to print it out from one place. I am the penny pincher in the family too and it just freaks me out to buy a loaf of gluten-free bread or something and get it home and it's awful. It's so expensive and then just goes in the garbage.

Thanks for any advice,

Cheree'

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I can't keep up and can't seem to afford this. :blink: HOW is EVERYONE else out there doing it?

Cheree'

I don't buy the specialty stuff. That's what I do. Meals consist of meats (turkey, chicken, beef, fish, pork), vegetables (oh, I could make a list a page long), fruit (again... page long list), naturally gluten-free grains/legumes (brown rice, white rice, corn, quinoa, millet, beans, lentils), and spices to season whatever I'm cookin'. There's practically no limit to what you can make with fresh ingredients. ;-)

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This is a great opportunity for you to draw some lines that no one can cross. If there's no pancake mix left but your gluten-free mix, then no one can use it. Plain and simple. That's not a hard rule to follow. gluten-free is off limits to those members of the family that don't require it for daily sustenence. Period.

Another thing. You are worth the cost of the food you need. Don't quibble over the cost of a loaf of bread. You will have some trial and error in this area because taste is important, but some sacrifices from within the family can be made if money is that tight for your family.

Specialty stores/on line shopping can be used ONLY for breads if you're on a tight budget.

Tinkyada pastas specialty store (for spahgetti or mac and cheese etc)

Kinnikinnick tapioca bread specialty store or on line

Chebe bread Order from gluten free mall get mixes, they're cheaper

Kinnikinnick doughnuts are great

read lables carefully in your local store. You can live off what they have there if you have to.

Post fruity pebbles/cocoa pebbles

corn tortillas

taco shells usually

If you can't afford breads and other specialty products, use corn tortillas for wraps. Wrap your hot dog in one, wrap your hamburger in one. Wrap a banana and peanut butter up in one. Egg wraps in the morning. Good luck.

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Hi,

I know it's hard at first to realize that your whole life is changing, but as a person who apparently started having celiac symptoms at age 8, and now I'm 60, I've had a bit of time to get used to the idea.

It seems that more and more people are being diagnosed, and that is good! Hopefully you will never have to experience the years and years of uncertain health that went with not knowing where those symptoms of illness came from for those of us who had it long ago. Doctors didn't have a clue, and trial and error was about the only way to figure out that what we put into our bodies was what caused our distress.

The diet does get easier, and the cravings just seem to go away once you stick to this way of eating religiously. Did you know that the longer you ingest grains, the more intolerances you develop to other foods.? My intolerances include all grains, all milk and dairy products, egg whites, and yeast, as well as maltodextrin, casein, etc. All the soy substitutes I've found seem to contain at least one of these, except, last week I found a soy ice cream bar covered in chocolate and almonds with no milk or anything in the list above added. I was so elated!

The best part of having this disease for so long is that now, my grandson and sister have been diagnosed, and last night I heard my cousin may have it. With all the practice I've done creating recipes and searching health food stores, I can save them a lot of time as they work toward good health. Oh, and I remember that severe asthma, depression, and "brain fog" I used to experience so frequently, along with a tiredness which just never seemed to end. Life will get better for you. Keep posting, and know that you are never alone as you work to find solutions in your quest to feel better. Best wishes. Welda Lou

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depression, and "brain fog" I used to experience so frequently, along with a tiredness which just never seemed to end.

Welda, I have been having alot of that "brain fog" and tiredness lately. I have been gluten-free for about 4 weeks, I have been very careful. Physically, I feel great, but I wonder if I need the same dosage of antidepressant that I've been taking before?! Any ideas on this? Anyone? -Patty

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Patty- I'm SO glad you asked that question because I've been thinking the same thing myself. I've been gluten-free since January (except for 10 days before my biopsy. Ugh!) and I was on three medications- Wellbutrin, klonopin and Celexa. I was able to cut out the Wellbutrin and drop from 3 mg of the klonopin to 2 mg but I'm now thinking I may need to cut down on my Celexa as well because I feel over-sedated and medicated. I'm going to talk to my doctor first but that is an excellent question. I think I may have been on such high doses because my body wasn't absorbing anything. Let me know what goes on with you. Best, Beverly

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I used to get very depressed about not eating pizza until I started making my own. Now that I have the hang of it, it tastes better than frozen pizza and I can put whatever I want on it.

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    • I am so confused right now.... 6 years ago I went on gluten free diet... after being on it for the first yr I was 100%better up until 5 months ago in got the "flu" the doctors told me to cut out dairy sonic did and my diarrhea  became better but not completely gone would not have it every day tho. I went to the gi doctor and they said to cut out fructose and dairy and keep gluten out... yesterday I went to the dietitian to see what I can eat and she gave me the list for fructose... she said it should have been on a antibiotic for sibo.... eventually I will be able to add dairy back and maybe gluten.... I said how can I add gluten back when this was my first problem... she goes well through fructose goes hand in hand with it... I said with gluten I vomit and am sick for weeks.... fructose isn't that bad I vomit sometimes but I'm not sick for weeks.... I'm just confused on really what is going on and was wondering if you or someone you know had sibo from gluten and or fructose and how Is this all related?
    • I see no one has responded to your query.  Unfortunately I have yet to try making a pie crust.  It was something I never mastered before going gluten free.  Have you looked on Pinterest?  You might find something there.
    • I honestly feel like both doctors think it's all in my head even though there is proof.  Yeah there was a point when I felt crazy.  That was when I was being shuffled from dr to dr being given individual diagnoses of my problems.  None of those diagnoses ever made me get better.  Seriously I was diagnosed with heart palpitations, neurocardiogenic syncope, I was given a butt load of steroids because a dr felt like I was producing too much adrenaline, freaking had a few tell me I was depressed, and the good ol IBS.  It seemed most wanted to push pills.  It's all just ridiculous!
    • I can't believe your doctors!!! You have a daughter who is dx'd already! Yet the ped doesn't want to test your other kids unless you have a dx????!!! Are you kidding me???!!! That's absurd!!! They have a first degree relative who has been dx'd with celiac already. There is no need to wait to see what you turn out to be!! And then, and then, and then....don't even get me started on your doctor!!! Does he have brain damage? Oh this is insane & ridiculous!  I have never heard of a disease that doctors are so unwilling to consider or test for OR to diagnose as this one! Usually they are hot to trot to make a dx but say the word celiac & they shake in their boots. Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    • I had a negative biopsy and was still diagnosed with Celiac. My GI ran a bunch of tests looking for the cause of my 15+ years of diarrhea and the only thing that came back positive was the entire Celiac panel. All very high. So he performed an endoscopy with biopsy. The biopsy was negative. So he ordered a genetic test. When that came back as "high risk" he decided a trial gluten free diet was in order. After 8 weeks my symptoms resolved and my antibodies were back to normal. Since then, follow up testing had shown I have osteoporosis. I am a 40 year old male.  So yes, you can definitely still have it and have significant damage with a negative biopsy. 
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